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30 Top High-Paying Medical Jobs with Little Schooling (Associate Degree OR Lower) – 2022


Written By: Darby Faubion BSN, RN

Are you interested in a career in the healthcare industry? Has the time it takes to earn some healthcare degrees kept you from pursuing your dream of having a medical-related job? Have you asked yourself, "What are the top high-paying medical jobs with little schooling?" If this sounds like you, the information in this article could be what you need to help change the trajectory of your career pursuits. As you continue reading, you will discover the 30 top high-paying medical jobs with little schooling in 2022. I will share information about the requirements to work these jobs, where you could become employed, and offer some insight into potential earnings and job outlook.


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Are High-Paying Medical Jobs With Little Schooling Easy To Find?


High-paying medical jobs with little schooling are easier to find than you may think. Whether you want to work in a hands-on role or behind the scenes, several opportunities are available.


3 Pros Of High-Paying Medical Jobs With Little Schooling


As you learn about different high-paying medical careers with little schooling, it is important to consider the advantages and disadvantages associated with them. The following are a few pros of seeking high-paying medical jobs that do not require extensive learning programs.

1. You can begin working faster:

Careers that require little post-secondary education offer the opportunity to start working and earning faster than careers that require several years of school.

2. The faster you begin working, the sooner you can start accomplishing financial goals:

Let's face it, the idea of pursuing high-paying medical jobs with little schooling is about making as much money as possible without devoting a great deal of time to school.

3. There are opportunities for advancement:

One of the great things about the medical industry is that there are endless opportunities for growth, learning, and career advancement. Although you may not be ready to commit to a lengthy education path now, you may decide to pursue a higher degree later.


3 Cons Of High-Paying Medical Jobs With Little Schooling


As with everything in life, high-paying medical jobs with little schooling have advantages and disadvantages. A few of the cons you may want to consider include the following.

1. You may face competition from more qualified job applicants:

Some employers and healthcare organizations prefer to hire candidates who have higher degrees. Even those who do not look for higher degree levels may seek applicants with skills that make it easier for them to cross-train, which could put you at a disadvantage.

2. If you want to advance, you may need to seek additional training or a higher degree:

The great thing about high-paying medical jobs with little schooling is that there are plenty to choose from. However, once you reach the high-end of the earning potential for that job or if you want to pursue a more advanced role, you may need to go back to school.

3. You may be limited to a specific job:

Medical careers that require little or no post-secondary training can limit your options when it comes to positions that interest you.



WHAT ARE THE TOP HIGH-PAYING MEDICAL JOBS WITH LITTLE SCHOOLING?


(Based on average salary figures from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the following are the 30 top high-paying medical jobs that require only an associate degree or lower. For each job, I will provide important information including potential income, where they work, training and education needed, job outlook, and the highest paying states.)

1. Radiation Therapist

Typical Education Needed for Entry:

Associate Degree

Typical On-The-Job Training Needed to Attain Competency:

None

Annual Job Openings:

1,100

10-Year Job Outlook:

+9.04%

Annual Salary Range:

$60,080 - $132,930

Highest Paying States:

California, New York, Oregon, Washington, Montana, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Delaware, and Colorado

What is the Job Role of a Radiation Therapist:

Radiation therapists work as part of the medical team under the direction of oncologists. The role of a radiation therapist is to prepare patients and administer radiation treatments to patients with cancer and other conditions. Radiation therapists monitor patient responses to radiation therapy, including side effects or adverse reactions. At times they may adjust the doses or schedule of radiation treatments as per physician orders.

Where Do Radiation Therapists Work:

Radiation therapists work in various settings, including hospitals, outpatient oncology centers, and physician's offices. Some radiation therapists work in colleges, universities, or professional schools as instructors.

Workplace Employment
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 10,130
Offices of Physicians 4,270
Specialty Hospitals 1,070
Outpatient Care Centers 1,030
Colleges, Universities, and Professional Schools 220
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)

Schooling Requirements to Become a Radiation Therapist:

Radiation therapists can begin their careers by earning an associate degree in radiation therapy. Most states have established laws regarding the licensing and practice of radiation therapists. In addition to becoming licensed in the state of practice, many states also require candidates to become certified and registered through the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT).

Job Outlook for Radiation Therapists:

According to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of radiation therapists is expected to grow nine percent from 2020 to 2030. Approximately 1,100 new and replacement job openings for radiation therapists are expected each year. The major contributor to the increase in job openings for radiation therapists is the increased incidence of cancer among aging people. Therefore, as the population ages, the need for radiation therapists is expected to increase.

How Much Does a Radiation Therapist Make:

A radiation therapist is one of the best-paying medical jobs with little schooling. Entry-level radiation therapists earn an average of $60,080 each year. With as few as one to four years of experience, salaries can increase by more than $11,000. Radiation therapists with ten to nineteen years of experience can earn up to $107,830 annually. The average income for radiation therapists is $94,300. California, New York, and Oregon are among the states that pay radiation therapists the most.

Level of Experience Hourly Monthly Annual
Entry-Level $28.88 $5,010 $60,080
1-4 Years of Experience $34.30 $5,950 $71,350
5-9 Years of Experience $41.75 $7,240 $86,850
10-19 Years of Experience $51.84 $8,990 $107,830
20 Years or More Experience $63.91 $11,080 $132,930
Average Salary $45.34 $7,860 $94,300
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


2. Nuclear Medicine Technologist

Typical Education Needed for Entry:

Associate Degree

Typical On-The-Job Training Needed to Attain Competency:

None

Annual Job Openings:

1,500

10-Year Job Outlook:

+7.65%

Annual Salary Range:

$57,830 - $109,070

Highest Paying States:

California, Rhode Island, Washington, Hawaii, Connecticut, Oregon, New York, New Jersey, Colorado, and Minnesota

What is the Job Role of a Nuclear Medicine Technologist:

Nuclear Medicine Technologists prepare and administer radioactive drugs, also referred to as radiopharmaceuticals, used for imaging or treatment procedures. The role of a Nuclear Medicine Technologist may vary depending on their employer's guidelines. Some responsibilities associated with the role include educating patients about proposed treatments or tests, promoting a safe work environment, performing organ imaging, performing scans such as Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Single Photon Emission.

Where Do Nuclear Medicine Technologists Work:

Nuclear Medicine Technologists work in specialty hospitals, outpatient care centers, medical and diagnostic laboratories, and physicians' offices. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, seventy-three percent of Nuclear Medicine Technologists are employed in general medical and surgical hospitals.

Workplace Employment
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 12,500
Offices of Physicians 2,580
Medical and Diagnostic Laboratories 1,330
Outpatient Care Centers 510
Specialty Hospitals 240
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)

Schooling Requirements to Become a Nuclear Medicine Technologist:

You can begin your career as a Nuclear Medicine Technologist with an associate degree in nuclear medicine technology. Most states require candidates to become certified. There are two national certification boards, the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (AART) and the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB).

Job Outlook for Nuclear Medicine Technologists:

The job outlook for Nuclear Medicine Technologists is favorable. The BLS projects a 7.65% increase in jobs through 2030. Approximately 1,500 new and replacement job openings are expected each year.

How Much Does a Nuclear Medicine Technologist Make:

Nuclear Medicine Technologists earn between $57,830 - $109,070. Entry-level NMTs earn an average of $57,830. With one to four years of experience, these technologists can see an increase in earning up to $68,370. Ten to twenty years of experience can earn between $95,230 and $109,070. The average annual income for all experience levels is $82,080, making this one of the best high-paying medical jobs with little schooling. Nuclear Medicine Technologists in California, Rhode Island, Washington, and Hawaii earn some of the highest wages for this specialty.

Level of Experience Hourly Monthly Annual
Entry-Level $27.80 $4,820 $57,830
1-4 Years of Experience $32.87 $5,700 $68,370
5-9 Years of Experience $38.26 $6,630 $79,590
10-19 Years of Experience $45.78 $7,940 $95,230
20 Years or More Experience $52.44 $9,090 $109,070
Average Salary $39.46 $6,840 $82,080
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


3. Dental Hygienist

Typical Education Needed for Entry:

Associate Degree

Typical On-The-Job Training Needed to Attain Competency:

None

Annual Job Openings:

15,600

10-Year Job Outlook:

+11.21%

Annual Salary Range:

$54,200 - $104,420

Highest Paying States:

Alaska, California, Washington, Nevada, New Jersey, Maryland, Colorado, Hawaii, Oregon, and Delaware

What is the Job Role of a Dental Hygienist:

Dental Hygienists work under the supervision of a dentist and assist with preventive dental treatments and examinations. The hygienist's role includes functions such as teeth cleaning, performing oral x-rays, and educating patients about the importance of oral hygiene and oral health practices. Dental hygienists help maintain instrumentation used for dental hygiene by selecting appropriate instruments for patient care, sharpening, and sterilizing equipment. In some states, dental hygienists can administer anesthetics, per company protocol.

Where Do Dental Hygienists Work:

The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports more than 183,000 Dental Hygienists work in dentist offices. Dental Hygienists also work in various other settings, including employment services, physicians' offices, and outpatient clinics.

Workplace Employment
Offices of Dentists 183,280
Employment Services 2,950
Offices of Physicians 2,410
Outpatient Care Centers 1,640
Federal Executive Branch 860
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)

Schooling Requirements to Become a Dental Hygienist:

A minimum associate degree in dental hygiene is required to become a dental hygienist. Licensure to practice as a dental hygienist is granted by individual states. Requirements for licensure typically include:

· Graduation from an accredited dental hygiene program.
· Completing the written National Board Dental Hygiene Examination.
· Completing a state or regional clinical board examination.


Job Outlook for Dental Hygienists:

The job outlook for dental hygienists is quite favorable, with an expected increase in jobs by more than eleven percent through 2030. The specialty expects to see approximately 15,600 job openings for dental hygienists each year, including both new and replacement job opportunities.

How Much Does a Dental Hygienist Make:

Dental Hygienists rank #3 among our featured top-paying medical jobs with little schooling. Dental hygienist salaries range from $26.06 per hour for entry-level hygienists to more than $50 per hour for experienced ones. The average annual salary of all salaries combined from entry-level to twenty years or more of experience is $78,050. Alaska, Nevada, New Jersey, and Maryland are some top choices for states that pay Dental Hygienists high salaries.

Level of Experience Hourly Monthly Annual
Entry-Level $26.06 $4,520 $54,200
1-4 Years of Experience $31.46 $5,450 $65,440
5-9 Years of Experience $37.06 $6,420 $77,090
10-19 Years of Experience $44.05 $7,640 $91,620
20 Years or More Experience $50.20 $8,700 $104,420
Average Salary $37.52 $6,500 $78,050
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


4. Diagnostic Medical Sonographer

Typical Education Needed for Entry:

Associate Degree

Typical On-The-Job Training Needed to Attain Competency:

None

Annual Job Openings:

7,300

10-Year Job Outlook:

+18.97%

Annual Salary Range:

$53,790 - $105,340

Highest Paying States:

California, Hawaii, Alaska, Rhode Island, Washington, Oregon, Wisconsin, Colorado, Connecticut, and Arizona

What is the Job Role of a Diagnostic Medical Sonographer:

A Diagnostic Medical Sonographer is another excellent option for high-paying medical jobs with little schooling. The Diagnostic Medical Sonographer is responsible for performing diagnostic procedures using sonographic equipment. They use sonographic equipment that delivers high-frequency sound waves to a designated part of a patient's body to create images for analysis and diagnosis. The Diagnostic Medical Sonographer analysis results from sonograms to calculate measurements of images and present them to the ordering physician for a definitive diagnosis and treatment plan.

Where Do Diagnostic Medical Sonographers Work:

Some Diagnostic Medical Sonographers work at colleges, universities, and professional schools. Others work in outpatient centers and medical or diagnostic laboratories. The most common places of employment for Diagnostic Medical Sonographers are physicians' offices and general medical and surgical hospitals, which employ approximately 15,110 and 44,570 Diagnostic Medical Sonographers, respectively.

Workplace Employment
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 44,570
Offices of Physicians 15,110
Medical and Diagnostic Laboratories 8,330
Outpatient Care Centers 3,200
Colleges, Universities, and Professional Schools 750
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)

Schooling Requirements to Become a Diagnostic Medical Sonographer:

An associate degree or post-secondary certificate in Diagnostic Medical Sonography is required for an entry-level position as a Diagnostic Medical Sonographer. Although diagnostic medical sonography certification is not mandated in all states, employers typically prefer to hire sonographers who have a professional certification. Certification in Basic Life Support is also preferred.

Job Outlook for Diagnostic Medical Sonographers:

The outlook for diagnostic medical sonographer jobs is excellent. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports an expected increase in overall jobs of 18.97% between 2020 and 2030. Approximately 7,300 new and replacement job openings are expected each year.

How Much Does a Diagnostic Medical Sonographer Make:

Diagnostic Medical Sonographers earn generous salaries, averaging $77,790 annually. Entry-level sonographers in this position earn nearly $54,000 yearly, which is nineteen thousand dollars higher than the average individual income in the United States. California, Hawaii, Alaska, Rhode Island, Washington, Oregon, Wisconsin, Colorado, Connecticut, and Arizona offer the highest wages for diagnostic medical sonographers.

Level of Experience Hourly Monthly Annual
Entry-Level $25.86 $4,480 $53,790
1-4 Years of Experience $30.30 $5,250 $63,020
5-9 Years of Experience $36.50 $6,330 $75,920
10-19 Years of Experience $43.72 $7,580 $90,940
20 Years or More Experience $50.64 $8,780 $105,340
Average Salary $37.40 $6,480 $77,790
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Technologist

Typical Education Needed for Entry:

Associate Degree

Typical On-The-Job Training Needed to Attain Competency:

None

Annual Job Openings:

3,400

10-Year Job Outlook:

+8.10%

Annual Salary Range:

$52,880 - $104,210

Highest Paying States:

California, Hawaii, Washington, Alaska, Rhode Island, Nevada, Oregon, New York, Massachusetts, and New Jersey

What is the Job Role of a Magnetic Resonance Imaging Technologist:

Magnetic Resonance Imaging Technicians prepare patients and coordinate with physicians to provide diagnostic imaging. MRI Techs may start IVs. They work with patients to make sure the patient understands proposed procedures and provides education, as needed, operate MRI machines, and coordinate with physicians to make sure results are received in a timely manner.

Where Do Magnetic Resonance Imaging Technologists Work:

MRI Technologists work in general medical and surgical hospitals, medical and diagnostic laboratories, physicians' offices, outpatient care centers, and specialty hospitals.

Workplace Employment
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 23,230
Medical and Diagnostic Laboratories 7,410
Offices of Physicians 5,210
Outpatient Care Centers 1,390
Specialty Hospitals 510
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)

Schooling Requirements to Become a Magnetic Resonance Imaging Technologist:

The minimum education needed to become a Magnetic Resonance Imaging Technologist is an associate degree. Although all states do not require certification, many MRI technologists seek national certification through the American Registry of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Technologists (ARMRIT) or the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT).

Job Outlook for Magnetic Resonance Imaging Technologists:

Magnetic Resonance Imaging Technologists are expected to see approximately 3,400 job openings in their field each year, including new and replacement jobs. The BLS projects an 8.1% growth in jobs for these technicians through 2030.

How Much Does a Magnetic Resonance Imaging Technologist Make:

Magnetic Resonance Imaging Technologists come in at #5 among the top high-paying medical jobs with little schooling. MRI Techs start out with an average yearly salary of $52,880. Within ten years, they can earn more than $74,000. Although the average annual income for MRI technologists of all experience levels is $75,960, some earn up to $104,210.

Level of Experience Hourly Monthly Annual
Entry-Level $25.42 $4,410 $52,880
1-4 Years of Experience $29.88 $5,180 $62,140
5-9 Years of Experience $35.91 $6,220 $74,690
10-19 Years of Experience $42.49 $7,360 $88,370
20 Years or More Experience $50.10 $8,680 $104,210
Average Salary $36.52 $6,330 $75,960
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


6. Respiratory Therapist

Typical Education Needed for Entry:

Associate Degree

Typical On-The-Job Training Needed to Attain Competency:

None

Annual Job Openings:

10,100

10-Year Job Outlook:

+23.02%

Annual Salary Range:

$45,940 - $89,170

Highest Paying States:

California, New York, Hawaii, Nevada, Massachusetts, Washington, New Jersey, Alaska, Oregon, and Connecticut

What is the Job Role of a Respiratory Therapist:

Respiratory Therapists care for people with disorders associated with the respiratory system. They treat patients dealing with issues including asthma, pneumonia, bronchitis, lung cancer, prematurity, and chest trauma. Respiratory therapists work closely with physicians who diagnose conditions. Some responsibilities of respiratory therapists include intubating patients, monitoring vital signs, checking blood oxygen levels, administering pulmonary medications, performing lung function tests (LFTs), and caring for patients with tracheostomies.

Where Do Respiratory Therapists Work:

The majority of Respiratory Therapists work in general medical and surgical hospitals. However, some also work in nursing care facilities, such as nursing homes or assisted living facilities, physicians' offices, specialty hospitals, and outpatient clinics.

Workplace Employment
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 101,820
Specialty Hospitals 6,780
Nursing Care Facilities 5,520
Offices of Physicians 2,750
Outpatient Care Centers 2,240
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)

Schooling Requirements to Become a Respiratory Therapist:

To become a Respiratory Therapist, the first step is to earn an associate degree in respiratory health. After completing an associate degree, candidates are eligible to take the Therapist Multiple-Choice (TMC) Examination administered by the American Association for Respiratory Care. Depending on the candidate's score on the TMC, he may earn the Certified Respiratory Therapist or Registered Respiratory Therapist credential.

Job Outlook for Respiratory Therapists:

There is a high demand for respiratory therapists, and a positive job outlook is projected to continue. The new job growth rate for respiratory therapy jobs is expected to be around 23.03% through 2030. Approximately 10,100 new and replacement jobs will be available each year.

How Much Does a Respiratory Therapist Make:

Respiratory Therapists earn salaries between $45,940 for entry-level therapists and $89,170 for more experienced therapists. The average annual wage for these specialists is $65,640. Generally, Respiratory Therapists see increases in their incomes between $8,000 and $13,000 with each five to ten years of experience.

Level of Experience Hourly Monthly Annual
Entry-Level $22.09 $3,830 $45,940
1-4 Years of Experience $26.04 $4,510 $54,170
5-9 Years of Experience $30.20 $5,230 $62,810
10-19 Years of Experience $36.51 $6,330 $75,950
20 Years or More Experience $42.87 $7,430 $89,170
Average Salary $31.56 $5,470 $65,640
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


7. Radiologic Technologist and Technician

Typical Education Needed for Entry:

Associate Degree

Typical On-The-Job Training Needed to Attain Competency:

None

Annual Job Openings:

17,400

10-Year Job Outlook:

+8.63%

Annual Salary Range:

$42,180 - $92,660

Highest Paying States:

California, Hawaii, Alaska, Massachusetts, Washington, Oregon, Rhode Island, New York, Connecticut, and Nevada

What is the Job Role of a Radiologic Technologist and Technician:

Radiologic Technologists/Technicians rank as another of the top high-paying medical jobs with little schooling. They perform digital imaging procedures such as x-rays, CT scans, ultrasounds, and mammograms. Their roles include:

· Educating patients about procedures.
· Assisting patients and physicians during procedures.
· Utilizing computer programs to collect patient information.


Where Do Radiologic Technologists and Technicians Work:

Radiologic Technologists and Technicians work in diverse settings. Some RTs work in medical and diagnostic laboratories, physicians' offices, and outpatient care centers. The largest number of Radiologic Technologists work in general medical and surgical hospitals, with over 123,000 employed in these settings.

Workplace Employment
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 123,710
Offices of Physicians 39,240
Outpatient Care Centers 14,130
Medical and Diagnostic Laboratories 13,510
Federal Executive Branch 5,770
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)

Schooling Requirements to Become a Radiologic Technologist and Technician:

Radiologic Technologists/Technicians must earn a minimum associate degree in radiologic studies. After earning a degree, they must also have a valid Radiologic Technologist license, be registered with the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists, and have a current BLS for the healthcare provider certification (CPR or CPR/AED).

Job Outlook for Radiologic Technologists and Technicians:

The job outlook for Radiologic Technologists/Technicians is promising, with the Bureau of Labor Statistics estimating an 8.63% increase in jobs between 2020 and 2030. An estimated 17,400 job openings are expected each year, including new positions as well as replacement jobs.

How Much Does a Radiologic Technologist and Technician Make:

With annual salaries ranging from $42,180 for entry-level RTs to more experienced Radiologic Technologists making more than $92,000 yearly, this is another of the available top high-paying medical jobs with little schooling. The average income for Radiologic Technicians overall is $64,840 annually.

Level of Experience Hourly Monthly Annual
Entry-Level $20.28 $3,520 $42,180
1-4 Years of Experience $24.36 $4,220 $50,670
5-9 Years of Experience $29.76 $5,160 $61,900
10-19 Years of Experience $36.79 $6,380 $76,520
20 Years or More Experience $44.55 $7,720 $92,660
Average Salary $31.17 $5,400 $64,840
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


8. Occupational Therapy Assistant

Typical Education Needed for Entry:

Associate Degree

Typical On-The-Job Training Needed to Attain Competency:

None

Annual Job Openings:

7,800

10-Year Job Outlook:

+36.03%

Annual Salary Range:

$43,180 - $84,090

Highest Paying States:

California, Nevada, New Jersey, Texas, Connecticut, Virginia, Florida, Arkansas, Louisiana, and Alabama

What is the Job Role of an Occupational Therapy Assistant:

An Occupational Therapy Assistant assists and supports the occupational therapist who conducts therapy treatments focused on improving the patient's physical health and mobility. Occupational Therapy Assistants help patients with therapeutic activities such as stretching or other exercises. They help children with developmental disabilities to engage in play activities that promote socialization and coordination. OTAs help patients use equipment designed to make activities of daily living easier, such as using forks or spoons with special handles to help when eating.

Where Do Occupational Therapy Assistants Work:

Occupational Therapy Assistants work in various settings. Some OTAs work in elementary or secondary schools, general medical and surgical hospitals, nursing care facilities, and home health agencies. The majority of occupational therapy assistants work in the offices of other health practitioners, such as physicians' offices or occupational therapy centers.

Workplace Employment
Offices of Other Health Practitioners 19,610
Nursing Care Facilities 7,510
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 4,980
Home Health Care Services 3,240
Elementary and Secondary Schools 1,740
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)

Schooling Requirements to Become an Occupational Therapy Assistant:

Occupational Therapy Assistant programs are generally two-year associate degree programs. The American Occupational Therapy Association and the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education accredit more than two hundred occupational therapy assistant programs nationwide.

Job Outlook for Occupational Therapy Assistants:

The job outlook for occupational therapy assistants is impressive, with an anticipated 36.03% growth between 2020 and 2030. This occupation can expect to see 7,800 job openings each year, as projected by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

How Much Does an Occupational Therapy Assistant Make:

With salaries ranging between $43,180 and $84,090, Occupational Therapy Assistants hold some of the highest-paying medical jobs with little schooling. California, Nevada, New Jersey, Texas, Connecticut, Virginia, Florida, Arkansas, Louisiana, and Alabama offer the highest wages for OTAs. The national average annual income is $63,420.

Level of Experience Hourly Monthly Annual
Entry-Level $20.76 $3,600 $43,180
1-4 Years of Experience $25.79 $4,470 $53,640
5-9 Years of Experience $30.26 $5,250 $62,940
10-19 Years of Experience $35.95 $6,230 $74,770
20 Years or More Experience $40.43 $7,010 $84,090
Average Salary $30.49 $5,290 $63,420
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


9. Cardiovascular Technologist and Technician

Typical Education Needed for Entry:

Associate Degree

Typical On-The-Job Training Needed to Attain Competency:

None

Annual Job Openings:

4,700

10-Year Job Outlook:

+8.08%

Annual Salary Range:

$30,140 - $96,790

Highest Paying States:

Rhode Island, Oregon, California, New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Colorado, Hawaii, Nevada, and New York

What is the Job Role of a Cardiovascular Technologist and Technician:

Cardiovascular technologists and technicians conduct diagnostic tests on patients to determine cardiovascular abnormalities. Some job duties include monitoring a patient's heart rate and blood pressure during diagnostic or therapeutic procedures, educating patients about procedures, performing electrocardiograms (EKG) and diagnostic tests associated with the vascular system. They may also assist with procedures such as cardiac catheterizations or the placement of cardiac stents.

Where Do Cardiovascular Technologists and Technicians Work:

Cardiovascular Technologists/Technicians work in several settings, including ambulatory surgery centers, outpatient clinics, specialty hospitals, physicians' offices, and general medical and surgical hospitals. Eighty-two percent of the more than fifty-three thousand Cardiovascular Technologists in the United States work in general medical and surgical hospitals.

Workplace Employment
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 43,610
Offices of Physicians 5,690
Outpatient Care Centers 1,890
Specialty Hospitals 1,050
Other Ambulatory Health Care Services 860
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)

Schooling Requirements to Become a Cardiovascular Technologist and Technician:

Cardiovascular Technicians/Technologists typically earn at least an associate degree. The first year of education includes core coursework and is followed by a year of specialty instruction, depending on the student's interests. A few specialties include invasive cardiology, noninvasive cardiology, noninvasive echo-cardiology, and noninvasive vascular cardiology.

Job Outlook for Cardiovascular Technologists and Technicians:

Cardiovascular Technologists are expected to have an 8.08% job growth rate. The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates a yearly availability of approximately 4,700 new and replacement jobs for cardiovascular technologists.

How Much Does a Cardiovascular Technologist and Technician Make:

The Cardiovascular Technologist role offers one of the highest-paying medical jobs with little schooling. Entry-level Cardiovascular Technologists/Technicians earn approximately $30,140 each year. In as few as five to nine years, Cardiovascular Techs can see an increase of more than $29,000 in their annual salaries. Although the average annual income for Cardiovascular Technologists is $60,940, some technicians earn nearly $97,000.

Level of Experience Hourly Monthly Annual
Entry-Level $14.49 $2,510 $30,140
1-4 Years of Experience $18.87 $3,270 $39,250
5-9 Years of Experience $28.41 $4,930 $59,100
10-19 Years of Experience $37.58 $6,510 $78,170
20 Years or More Experience $46.53 $8,070 $96,790
Average Salary $29.30 $5,080 $60,940
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


10. Hearing Aid Specialist

Typical Education Needed for Entry:

High School Diploma or Equivalent

Typical On-The-Job Training Needed to Attain Competency:

Moderate-Term On-The-Job Training

Annual Job Openings:

700

10-Year Job Outlook:

+11.25%

Annual Salary Range:

$29,960 - $81,170

Highest Paying States:

South Carolina, Connecticut, Florida, Kentucky, Wisconsin, Kansas, Illinois, North Carolina, Indiana, and Alabama

What is the Job Role of a Hearing Aid Specialist:

Hearing Aid Specialists have a variety of job roles, including administering hearing tests, taking ear impressions to help design, prepare, or modify ear molds, and selecting and fitting hearing aids for clients. Daily job responsibilities may also include instructing patients and families on using assistive hearing devices, calibrating or repairing facility equipment, and operating diagnostic and therapeutic hearing instruments and equipment.

Where Do Hearing Aid Specialists Work:

Some Hearing Aid Specialists work in some medical or surgical hospitals and ambulatory care and physicians' offices. The majority of Hearing Aid Specialists work in offices of health practitioners such as pediatricians or audiologists, or healthcare supply stores.

Workplace Employment
Health and Personal Care Stores 3,470
Offices of Other Health Practitioners 1,220
Other Ambulatory Health Care Services 450
Offices of Physicians 440
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 340
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)

Schooling Requirements to Become a Hearing Aid Specialist:

It is possible to land a job as a Hearing Aid Specialist with no more than a high school diploma or the equivalent. Most Hearing Aid Specialists learn the trade through on-the-job training. However, there are some options for those interested in earning certification as a Hearing Aid Specialist; several programs last three to six months. For example, the Hearing Aid Academy offers the Hearing Instrument Specialist certificate program, a self-paced program offered 100% online.

Job Outlook for Hearing Aid Specialists:

There are currently 7,770 certified Hearing Aid Specialists in the U.S. Per Bureau of Labor Statistics data and this career path has a positive outlook with a ten-year increase of 11.25%. The B.L.S. predicts seven hundred new and replacement job openings will become available yearly.

How Much Does a Hearing Aid Specialist Make:

Hearing Aid Specialists have one of the best high-paying medical jobs with little schooling, earning an average of $54,630 yearly. Entry-level specialists make about $14.40 per hour or $2,500 each month. Income levels increase significantly with experience, with the most experienced Hearing Aid Specialists earning more than $81,000 in some states. The states with the highest pay rates for these specialists include South Carolina, Connecticut, Florida, Kentucky, Wisconsin, Kansas, Illinois, North Carolina, Indiana, and Alabama.

Level of Experience Hourly Monthly Annual
Entry-Level $14.40 $2,500 $29,960
1-4 Years of Experience $18.57 $3,220 $38,620
5-9 Years of Experience $25.30 $4,390 $52,630
10-19 Years of Experience $30.83 $5,340 $64,120
20 Years or More Experience $39.02 $6,760 $81,170
Average Salary $26.26 $4,550 $54,630
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


11. Physical Therapist Assistant

Typical Education Needed for Entry:

Associate Degree

Typical On-The-Job Training Needed to Attain Competency:

None

Annual Job Openings:

16,400

10-Year Job Outlook:

+35.39%

Annual Salary Range:

$33,840 - $82,470

Highest Paying States:

California, Connecticut, Texas, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, Florida, New Hampshire, Washington, and Ohio

What is the Job Role of a Physical Therapist Assistant:

Physical Therapist Assistants work with patients who have medical conditions or injuries affecting their mobility or ability to perform common, everyday activities or tasks. Physical Therapy Assistants help patients perform exercises, administer therapeutic massages, heat and/or cold therapies, and participate in balance and coordination training. The role of a P.T.A. is to observe and assist patients and physical therapists before, during, and following physical therapy sessions.

Where Do Physical Therapist Assistants Work:

There are nearly ninety-three thousand Physical Therapy Assistants in the United States working in various settings. Some P.T.A.s work in physicians' offices, nursing homes, long-term care facilities, or for home health agencies. Approximately sixty-one thousand P.T.A.s work in general medical and surgical hospitals or offices of other healthcare practitioners.

Workplace Employment
Offices of Other Health Practitioners 41,370
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 19,330
Nursing Care Facilities 9,190
Home Health Care Services 8,770
Offices of Physicians 5,050
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)

Schooling Requirements to Become a Physical Therapist Assistant:

Physical Therapy Assistant programs are typically two-year associate degree programs. Licensure or certification is required in each state where a P.T.A. plans to practice. Graduates of Physical Therapy Assistant classes must pass the physical therapy assistant National Physical Therapy Exam administered by the Federation of State Boards of Physical Therapy.

Job Outlook for Physical Therapist Assistants:

The job outlook for Physical Therapy Assistants is quite promising. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts these professionals will see a 35.39% increase in job opportunities through 2030. Approximately sixteen thousand new and replacement P.T.A. jobs will become available each year.

How Much Does a Physical Therapist Assistant Make:

The Physical Therapy Assistant is among some of our featured top high-paying medical jobs with little schooling. P.T.A.s earn between $25,200 and $80,480 with an average annual salary of $52,400.

Level of Experience Hourly Monthly Annual
Entry-Level $12.12 $2,100 $25,200
1-4 Years of Experience $15.73 $2,730 $32,710
5-9 Years of Experience $26.08 $4,520 $54,250
10-19 Years of Experience $32.20 $5,580 $66,970
20 Years or More Experience $38.69 $6,710 $80,480
Average Salary $25.19 $4,370 $52,400
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


12. Surgical Technologist

Typical Education Needed for Entry:

Post-secondary Non-Degree Award

Typical On-The-Job Training Needed to Attain Competency:

None

Annual Job Openings:

9,000

10-Year Job Outlook:

+8.66%

Annual Salary Range:

$34,120 - $73,110

Highest Paying States:

Alaska, Nevada, California, Connecticut, Minnesota, Washington, Oregon, Rhode Island, New York, and Massachusetts

What is the Job Role of a Surgical Technologist:

Surgical Technologists, also known as operating room technicians, work alongside nurses and other surgical or operating room staff. Surgical techs work during all phases of surgical procedures: preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative. Preoperative assignments may include:

· Sterilizing the procedure or operating room and equipment.
· Arranging equipment and surgical tools.
· Prepping patients for procedures.


The Surgical Tech passes surgical tools during the procedures and may assist with retraction, counts tools and instruments during and after surgery, applies post-surgical dressings, and cleans the procedure area.

Where Do Surgical Technologists Work:

Surgical Technologists work in areas where surgeries or surgical-type procedures are performed. Some work settings include doctors' offices, outpatient care centers, ambulatory surgery centers, dentist offices, and specialty hospitals. Seventy-four percent of Surgical Technologists, approximately 76,770, work in general medical and surgical hospitals.

Workplace Employment
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 76,770
Offices of Physicians 11,140
Outpatient Care Centers 10,860
Offices of Dentists 2,980
Specialty Hospitals 1,860
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)

Schooling Requirements to Become a Surgical Technologist:

Although there are two-year degree programs specializing in surgical technology, if you want to become a Surgical Technologist in less time, you can earn a post-secondary certificate in as few as twelve months. While you may find a potential employer who does not require certification, most prefer Surgical Techs to be certified. The National Board of Surgical Technology and Surgical Assisting offers the most common credential, the Certified Surgical Technologist certification.

Job Outlook for Surgical Technologists:

The job outlook for Surgical Technologists remains favorable with an expected 8.66% ten-year increase. There is an anticipation of at least nine thousand new and replacement jobs being available yearly.

How Much Does a Surgical Technologist Make:

Surgical Technologists earn between $34,120 and $73,110 annually, making it another high-paying medical job with little schooling. Surgical Techs may see increases from $7,000 to $13,000 with four to ten years of work experience. The average annual income is $51,510, with Alaska, Nevada, California, Connecticut, Minnesota, Washington, Oregon, Rhode Island, New York, and Massachusetts paying the most.

Level of Experience Hourly Monthly Annual
Entry-Level $16.40 $2,840 $34,120
1-4 Years of Experience $19.72 $3,420 $41,010
5-9 Years of Experience $23.90 $4,140 $49,710
10-19 Years of Experience $29.32 $5,080 $60,980
20 Years or More Experience $35.15 $6,090 $73,110
Average Salary $24.76 $4,290 $51,510
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


13. Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurse

Typical Education Needed for Entry:

Post-secondary Non-Degree Award

Typical On-The-Job Training Needed to Attain Competency:

None

Annual Job Openings:

60,700

10-Year Job Outlook:

+9.27%

Annual Salary Range:

$35,570 - $65,520

Highest Paying States:

Alaska, California, Massachusetts, Washington, Nevada, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Oregon, and New Hampshire

What is the Job Role of a Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurse:

Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurses work as part of the interdisciplinary healthcare team providing nursing care to patients of all ages across the healthcare spectrum. Daily responsibilities of L.P.N./LVNs include monitoring vital signs, administering medications, performing wound care, and educating patients and their caregivers about illnesses, diseases, and treatments. The Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse reports directly to the Registered Nurse.

Where Do Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurses Work:

Most Licensed Practical and Vocational Nurses work in settings where hands-on, direct patient care is needed. For example, many L.P.N./LVNs work in doctors' offices, nursing care facilities, home health agencies, general medical and surgical hospitals, and assisted living or retirement homes and communities. They also work for hospice agencies, insurance companies, and some daycares.

Workplace Employment
Nursing Care Facilities 199,760
Offices of Physicians 88,300
Home Health Care Services 84,460
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 80,820
Continuing Care Retirement Communities and
Assisted Living Facilities for the Elderly
53,280
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)

Schooling Requirements to Become a Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurse:

The Licensed Practical Nurse is an excellent option for anyone interested in an entry-level nursing position. Candidates for this job should have a high school diploma or G.E.D. and must complete an accredited practical nursing program. Most LPN/LVN programs are offered through community colleges. After graduating from the practical nursing program, the next step is to take and pass the National Council Licensure Examination for Practical Nursing (NCLEX-PN).

Job Outlook for Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurses:

There is a shortage of licensed nurses nationwide, a problem that has worsened since the COVID-19 pandemic emerged. The pandemic, coupled with a growing number of nurses reaching retirement age, indicates the outlook for LPN/LVN jobs is promising. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data suggests a ten-year job growth of 9.27%. Approximately 60,700 new and replacement job openings are expected to be available each year.

How Much Does a Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurse Make:

Licensed Practical Nurses earn an average annual income of $50,090. Entry-level L.P.N./LVNs earn approximately $17.10 per hour or $2,960 monthly. With five to nine years of experience, some L.P.N.s earn up to $48,810. More experienced Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurses earn more than $65,000 yearly, making it another of our featured high-paying medical jobs with little schooling.

Level of Experience Hourly Monthly Annual
Entry-Level $17.10 $2,960 $35,570
1-4 Years of Experience $20.22 $3,510 $42,060
5-9 Years of Experience $23.47 $4,070 $48,820
10-19 Years of Experience $27.82 $4,820 $57,860
20 Years or More Experience $31.50 $5,460 $65,520
Average Salary $24.08 $4,170 $50,090
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


14. Massage Therapist

Typical Education Needed for Entry:

Post-secondary Non-Degree Award

Typical On-The-Job Training Needed to Attain Competency:

None

Annual Job Openings:

23,300

10-Year Job Outlook:

+32.16%

Annual Salary Range:

$22,580 - $79,150

Highest Paying States:

Alaska, Massachusetts, Washington, Oregon, Hawaii, Maine, New York, Nebraska, New Hampshire, and Minnesota

What is the Job Role of a Massage Therapist:

If you enjoy one on one interaction with people and want a high-paying medical job with little schooling, you may find massage therapy interests you. Massage therapists are responsible for treating clients by providing manipulation to the muscles and other soft tissues of the body. Massage Therapists help relieve pain, improve circulation, increase relaxation, and relieve stress through soft tissue manipulation. Massage Therapists advise clients on methods to stretch, relax, and strengthen muscles and evaluate clients to determine stressed or painful areas of the body.

Where Do Massage Therapists Work:

Massage Therapists work in a variety of settings, including healthcare facilities, physicians' offices, physical therapy departments/clinics, amusement and recreation industries, travel agencies, and personal care services agencies. Some Massage Therapists work independently, owning their own massage therapy businesses or working from their homes.

Workplace Employment
Personal Care Services 41,370
Offices of Other Health Practitioners 29,200
Traveler Accommodation 6,590
Other Amusement and Recreation Industries 2,690
Offices of Physicians 1,250
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)

Schooling Requirements to Become a Massage Therapist:

Most massage therapy courses confer a non-degree award such as a technical diploma or certificate of completion. Most states require massage therapists to obtain licensure before engaging in a practice. The Federation of State Massage Therapy Boards offers the Massage and Bodywork Licensing Examination. The National Certification Board for Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork offers the National Certification Examination for Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork.

Job Outlook for Massage Therapists:

The job outlook for Massage Therapists is optimistic, with a projected growth of 32.16% through 2030. Approximately 23,300 new and replacement job openings are expected each year.

How Much Does a Massage Therapist Make:

The average annual income for Massage Therapists in the U.S. is $47,350. With entry-level wages of nearly $11 per hour or $1,880 monthly, massage therapy is one of the best high-paying jobs with little schooling you can often achieve in less than a year.

Level of Experience Hourly Monthly Annual
Entry-Level $10.86 $1,880 $22,580
1-4 Years of Experience $14.43 $2,500 $30,010
5-9 Years of Experience $20.97 $3,640 $43,620
10-19 Years of Experience $28.75 $4,980 $59,790
20 Years or More Experience $38.05 $6,600 $79,150
Average Salary $22.76 $3,950 $47,350
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


15. Community Health Worker

Typical Education Needed for Entry:

High School Diploma or Equivalent

Typical On-The-Job Training Needed to Attain Competency:

Short-Term On-The-Job Training

Annual Job Openings:

8,600

10-Year Job Outlook:

+21.06%

Annual Salary Range:

$28,010 - $70,790

Highest Paying States:

New Mexico, Alaska, Rhode Island, Connecticut, North Dakota, California, Kansas, Wisconsin, Utah, and Wyoming

What is the Job Role of a Community Health Worker:

Community Health Workers fill a unique and vital role in the healthcare community. They provide support to local healthcare organizations. Some of their job duties include performing as health advocates, community health representatives, peer health educators, and outreach educators. Community Health Workers often offer informal counseling or guidance related to healthcare translation services.

Where Do Community Health Workers Work:

Community Health Workers work in some hospitals, doctors' offices, and outpatient centers. Most people in these roles work for local governments and individual or family services.

Workplace Employment
Individual and Family Services 10,900
Local Government, excluding schools and hospitals 9,730
Outpatient Care Centers 5,160
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 4,860
Offices of Physicians 3,560
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)

Schooling Requirements to Become a Community Health Worker:

Presently, there is no national standard established for Community Health Worker training, education, or certification. Most Community Health Workers participate in on-the-job training relevant to their specific role.

Job Outlook for Community Health Workers:

Community Health Workers play a vital role in reducing the burdens for patients and healthcare providers, helping to build healthier communities. Their efforts on communities and populations make them a popular choice for social change. The outlook for new jobs for Community Health Workers is positive with a predicted growth of 21.06% over the next 10 years. Approximately 8,600 new and replacement job openings are expected to be available each year.

How Much Does a Community Health Worker Make:

Community Health Workers earn between $28,010 and $70,790 yearly. Years of experience and the setting where they work, and the job requirements each impact the worker's earnings. The average annual income for Community Health Workers is $46,000, which makes it one of the high-paying medical jobs with little schooling.

Level of Experience Hourly Monthly Annual
Entry-Level $13.47 $2,330 $28,010
1-4 Years of Experience $16.33 $2,830 $33,960
5-9 Years of Experience $20.19 $3,500 $42,000
10-19 Years of Experience $26.12 $4,530 $54,320
20 Years or More Experience $34.03 $5,900 $70,790
Average Salary $22.12 $3,830 $46,000
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


16. Dental Laboratory Technician

Typical Education Needed for Entry:

High School Diploma or Equivalent

Typical On-The-Job Training Needed to Attain Competency:

Moderate-Term On-The-Job Training

Annual Job Openings:

4,900

10-Year Job Outlook:

+12.08%

Annual Salary Range:

$27,060 - $67,010

Highest Paying States:

New York, New Jersey, Virginia, Kansas, Massachusetts, Maine, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, and Washington

What is the Job Role of a Dental Laboratory Technician:

A Dental Laboratory Technician collaborates with dentists, orthodontists, and other dental technicians. In the scope of their practice, Dental Laboratory Technicians build and repair dental appliances make crowns, bridges, full and partial dentures, mouthguards, and other dental appliances.

Where Do Dental Laboratory Technicians Work:

A few examples of where Dental Laboratory Technicians work include dental offices, medical equipment, and supply manufacturers, federal executive branches, and multi-disciplinary physicians' offices. Some Dental Laboratory Technicians work at colleges, universities, and professional schools, as well.

Workplace Employment
Medical Equipment and Supplies Manufacturing 25,480
Offices of Dentists 3,970
Federal Executive Branch 510
Offices of Other Health Practitioners 180
Colleges, Universities, and Professional Schools 160
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)

Schooling Requirements to Become a Dental Laboratory Technician:

It is possible to launch a career as a Dental Laboratory Technician directly out of high school or after earning a high school equivalency certificate. Although you do not have to be certified as a dental technician to secure employment, the decision to pursue D.L.T. certification does make applicants appealing to prospective employers. Certification is a way for Dental Laboratory Technicians to demonstrate their knowledge and technical skills. The National Board for Certification in Dental Laboratory Technology offers a Dental Lab Tech Certification to qualified applicants.

Job Outlook for Dental Laboratory Technicians:

Dental Laboratory Technician is one of the high-paying medical jobs with little schooling projected to see continued growth. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data indicates this profession will see a ten-year growth of 12.08%. Approximately 4,900 new and replacement job openings are expected to be available each year.

How Much Does a Dental Laboratory Technician Make:

Entry-level Dental Laboratory Technicians earn approximately $2,260 monthly or $27,060 annually. With five to nine years of experience, earnings increase to more than $42,000. The average nationwide annual salary for Dental Laboratory Technicians is $45,230. Dental Laboratory Technicians in New York, New Jersey, Virginia, Kansas, Massachusetts, Maine, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, and Washington earn the highest wages in the U.S.

Level of Experience Hourly Monthly Annual
Entry-Level $13.01 $2,260 $27,060
1-4 Years of Experience $15.62 $2,710 $32,480
5-9 Years of Experience $20.25 $3,510 $42,110
10-19 Years of Experience $26.14 $4,530 $54,380
20 Years or More Experience $32.22 $5,580 $67,010
Average Salary $21.75 $3,770 $45,230
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


17. Dental Assistant

Typical Education Needed for Entry:

Post-secondary Non-Degree Award

Typical On-The-Job Training Needed to Attain Competency:

None

Annual Job Openings:

44,000

10-Year Job Outlook:

+11.18%

Annual Salary Range:

$28,940 - $58,390

Highest Paying States:

Minnesota, Massachusetts, Alaska, New Hampshire, Oregon, North Dakota, Washington, Rhode Island, Vermont, and New Jersey

What is the Job Role of a Dental Assistant:

Dental Assistants perform a variety of jobs involving office, laboratory, and patient care. Some responsibilities of this role include taking the patient's dental, medical, and medication history, preparing tables and trays for the dentist, cleaning and sterling instruments, and preparing treatment rooms for patient care. Dental Assistants perform dental x-rays, assist with dental cleaning and polishing, and assist the dentist with procedures as needed.

Where Do Dental Assistants Work:

While Dental Assistants work in settings such as employment services, outpatient centers, physicians' offices, and dental offices. Ninety-three percent of the 312,140 Dental Assistants working in the U.S. work in dental offices.

Workplace Employment
Offices of Dentists 279,850
Offices of Physicians 7,360
Outpatient Care Centers 5,500
Federal Executive Branch 3,670
Employment Services 3,610
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)

Schooling Requirements to Become a Dental Assistant:

The typical pathway to enter a career as a Dental Assistant is by earning a post-secondary technical diploma or certificate in dental assisting. Thirty-nine states require Dental Assistant candidates to achieve licensure through the Dental Assisting National Board. You can check your state's requirement for certification using this search-by-state map.

Job Outlook for Dental Assistants:

The outlook for Dental Assistant jobs is very promising, with B.L.S. data suggesting at least forty-four thousand job openings each year. The anticipated ten-year job outlook is 11.18%

How Much Does a Dental Assistant Make:

The average annual income for Dental Assistants is $42,310, equal to $20.34 hourly or $3,530 monthly. In some states, more experienced Dental Assistants earn as much as $58,390. North Dakota, Washington, and Rhode Island offer some of the highest salaries for Dental Assistants.

Level of Experience Hourly Monthly Annual
Entry-Level $13.91 $2,410 $28,940
1-4 Years of Experience $16.57 $2,870 $34,470
5-9 Years of Experience $19.80 $3,430 $41,180
10-19 Years of Experience $23.95 $4,150 $49,810
20 Years or More Experience $28.07 $4,870 $58,390
Average Salary $20.34 $3,530 $42,310
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


18. Optician

Typical Education Needed for Entry:

High School Diploma or Equivalent

Typical On-The-Job Training Needed to Attain Competency:

Long-Term On-The-Job Training

Annual Job Openings:

5,900

10-Year Job Outlook:

+6.16%

Annual Salary Range:

$26,080 - $62,180

Highest Paying States:

New Jersey, Connecticut, Alaska, New York, Massachusetts, California, Hawaii, Vermont, Washington, and Maryland

What is the Job Role of an Optician:

Optician is another example of good-paying medical careers with little schooling. Opticians work as part of the eye care team. General job duties include interpreting the results of eye examinations conducted by optometrists and ophthalmologists, recommending lenses, frames, and coatings for classes to suit customers' needs, measuring customers to determine the type and style of frames most suitable for them, and adjusting glasses frames for proper fit. Opticians prepare contact lenses and glasses orders by verifying prescriptions, lens thickness, and other specifications and processing orders accurately.

Where Do Opticians Work:

Some opticians work in physicians' offices, outpatient care centers, or general medical and surgical hospitals. Most opticians, however, work in health and personal care stores and offices of other health practitioners, such as opticians and ophthalmologists.

Workplace Employment
Offices of Other Health Practitioners 27,670
Health and Personal Care Stores 19,470
Offices of Physician 8,440
Outpatient Care Centers 1,840
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 250
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)

Schooling Requirements to Become an Optician:

Opticians typically have a high school diploma or equivalent, such as a G.E.D. While optometry courses are available, most opticians enter the occupation with on-the-job training relevant to their place of employment. The American Board of Opticianry offers various optician certifications, including basic certification examination options for anyone who is at least eighteen years old and possesses a high school diploma or G.E.D.

Job Outlook for Opticians:

Opticians should see a steady increase in jobs with a 6.16 percent increase through 2030. Approximately 5,900 new and replacement job openings are expected to be available every year.

How Much Does an Optician Make:

With a high school diploma or G.E.D., individuals can begin a career as an optician, making it one of the top high-paying medical jobs with little schooling required. Entry-level opticians earn an average of $2,170 monthly or $26,080 yearly. In as few as one to four years, they can earn more than $30,000 annually. While the average annual salary for opticians is $41,380, some earn up to 62,180.

Level of Experience Hourly Monthly Annual
Entry-Level $12.54 $2,170 $26,080
1-4 Years of Experience $14.68 $2,550 $30,540
5-9 Years of Experience $18.52 $3,210 $38,530
10-19 Years of Experience $24.11 $4,180 $50,150
20 Years or More Experience $29.89 $5,180 $62,180
Average Salary $19.89 $3,450 $41,380
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


19. Emergency Medical Technician and Paramedic

Typical Education Needed for Entry:

Post-secondary Non-Degree Award

Typical On-The-Job Training Needed to Attain Competency:

None

Annual Job Openings:

20,700

10-Year Job Outlook:

+10.95%

Annual Salary Range:

$24,650 - $62,150

Highest Paying States:

Hawaii, Washington, Maryland, Alaska, California, Illinois, New York, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Delaware

What is the Job Role of an Emergency Medical Technician and Paramedic:

If you are searching for the right high-paying medical jobs with little schooling and work well under pressure in a fast-paced environment, you may find the role of an Emergency Medical Technician or Paramedic is a good fit for you. Emergency Medical Technicians and Paramedics have similar roles. Both E.M.T.s and paramedics help stabilize patients in emergency situations and help facilitate their safe transfer to a hospital for emergency care. Emergency medical technicians and paramedics respond to 911 calls, assess patients for signs of injury, and monitor vital signs. When indicated, they use backboards and restraints, provide C.P.R., or apply dressings to wounds. E.M.T.s and paramedics prioritize medical care at the scene of accidents and notify receiving hospitals of incoming patients' status.

Where Do Emergency Medical Technicians and Paramedics Work:

Emergency Medical Technicians and Paramedics work in several settings. The most common employment settings for E.M.T.s and paramedics are for ambulance services and hospital emergency services. Other settings where they work include outpatient care centers, physicians' offices, and general medical and surgical hospitals.

Workplace Employment
Other Ambulatory Health Care Services 119,200
Local Government, excluding schools and hospitals 72,380
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 48,780
Outpatient Care Centers 3,320
Offices of Physicians 2,490
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)

Schooling Requirements to Become an Emergency Medical Technician and Paramedic:

Both E.M.T. and paramedic candidates can earn credentials in one to two years, depending on which role they prefer to pursue. Emergency Medical Technician programs can take as few as three or four months, including clinical rotations. After earning an Emergency Medical Technician-Basic (EMT-B) credential, interested individuals can pursue a paramedic credential. Paramedic programs may take up to a year to complete and generally require 1,200 to 1,500 hours of clinical experience. The National Registry for Emergency Medical Technicians confers both Emergency Medical Technician and Paramedic certifications to qualified applicants.

Job Outlook for Emergency Medical Technicians and Paramedics:

The employment of paramedics and emergency medical technicians is expected to grow by 10.95 percent from 2020 to 2030, which is faster than the average for all other occupations in the U.S. The B.L.S. anticipates 20,700 openings for paramedics and E.M.T.s each year.

How Much Does an Emergency Medical Technician and Paramedic Make:

The earning potential for emergency medical technicians and paramedics differs somewhat. The combined average for entry-level professionals in these positions is $24,650, while those with ten to nineteen years earn nearly $48,000 yearly. The average annual income for E.M.T.s and paramedics is $40,370, with some earning $62,000 or more.

Level of Experience Hourly Monthly Annual
Entry-Level $11.85 $2,050 $24,650
1-4 Years of Experience $14.02 $2,430 $29,170
5-9 Years of Experience $17.62 $3,050 $36,650
10-19 Years of Experience $22.99 $3,980 $47,810
20 Years or More Experience $29.88 $5,180 $62,150
Average Salary $19.41 $3,360 $40,370
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


20. Ophthalmic Medical Technician

Typical Education Needed for Entry:

Post-secondary Non-Degree Award

Typical On-The-Job Training Needed to Attain Competency:

None

Annual Job Openings:

5,500

10-Year Job Outlook:

+14.29%

Annual Salary Range:

$25,830 - $57,900

Highest Paying States:

Minnesota, Massachusetts, Alaska, New Jersey, Rhode Island, California, Vermont, New Hampshire, Oregon, and Maine

What is the Job Role of an Ophthalmic Medical Technician:

Ophthalmic Medical Technicians collect patient histories and help maintain optometry instruments. They assist with or administer diagnostic visual tests, including testing visual acuity, color perception, measuring eye pressure and pupil reactions, and administering eye medications. Unlike opticians who assist patients with contact lenses and glasses, the ophthalmic medical technician works directly with the ophthalmologist to assist with visual examinations and tests.

Where Do Ophthalmic Medical Technicians Work:

Ophthalmic Medical Technicians work in various settings, including outpatient care centers, medical and surgical hospitals, health and personal care stores. Most Ophthalmic Medical Technicians work in offices of health practitioners and eye doctors or other eye specialists.

Workplace Employment
Offices of Physicians 37,480
Offices of Other Health Practitioners 14,810
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 2,460
Health and Personal Care Stores 1,620
Outpatient Care Centers 1,480
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)

Schooling Requirements to Become an Ophthalmic Medical Technician:

To become an Ophthalmic Medical Technician, a post-secondary non-degree certificate program or technical diploma is necessary. While certification with a credentialing center is not always required, some employers may prefer certified Ophthalmic Medical Technicians. The Joint commission on Allied Health Personnel in Ophthalmology offers a certification examination for qualified applicants. It is also recommended that candidates are familiar with their state guidelines for certification.

Job Outlook for Ophthalmic Medical Technicians:

There is a good job outlook for Ophthalmic Medical Technicians, with projections of a 14.29 percent increase in new jobs. Approximately 5,500 new and replacement jobs are expected yearly.

How Much Does an Ophthalmic Medical Technician Make:

Ophthalmic Medical Technicians are another of our featured high-paying medical jobs with little schooling, many of which start out earning nearly $26,000 annually. The average salary range for these technicians is $25,830 to $57,900, with an average yearly income of $40,010.

Level of Experience Hourly Monthly Annual
Entry-Level $12.42 $2,150 $25,830
1-4 Years of Experience $14.92 $2,590 $31,030
5-9 Years of Experience $18.24 $3,160 $37,940
10-19 Years of Experience $22.83 $3,960 $47,490
20 Years or More Experience $27.84 $4,830 $57,900
Average Salary $19.24 $3,330 $40,010
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


21. Psychiatric Technician

Typical Education Needed for Entry:

Post-secondary Non-Degree Award

Typical On-The-Job Training Needed to Attain Competency:

Short-Term On-The-Job Training

Annual Job Openings:

8,000

10-Year Job Outlook:

+12.77%

Annual Salary Range:

$24,960 - $59,020

Highest Paying States:

California, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Hawaii, Washington, Alaska, New York, Colorado, Rhode Island, and Vermont

What is the Job Role of a Psychiatric Technician:

Psychiatric Technicians provide therapeutic care to clients experiencing developmental disabilities or mental health illnesses and diseases. The daily role of a psychiatric technician includes:

· Observing patient behavior.
· Leading patients in recreational or therapeutic activities.
· Helping with the admission or discharge of patients.
· Monitoring vital signs.


Depending on the work setting, psychiatric technicians may assist patients with activities of daily living such as bathing, dressing, grooming, eating, or toileting. They may participate in group activities, including playing games or field trips. Psychiatric techs help transport patients to hospitals, residential facilities, or doctors' appointments.

Where Do Psychiatric Technicians Work:

Psychiatric technicians work in several settings.

Some psych technicians work in healthcare offices, general medical or surgical hospitals, and outpatient care centers. Most psychiatric technicians work in psychiatric or substance abuse hospitals, inpatient psychiatric facilities, and substance abuse facilities.

Workplace Employment
Psychiatric and Substance Abuse Hospitals 30,530
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 14,490
Residential Intellectual and Developmental Disability,
Mental Health, and Substance Abuse Facilities
9,320
Offices of Other Health Practitioners 7,370
Outpatient Care Centers 6,290
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)

Schooling Requirements to Become a Psychiatric Technician:

If you aspire to become a psychiatric technician, you can begin your career by completing a psychiatric technician certificate program. Most certificate programs take less than a year to complete. The American Association of Psychiatric Technicians administers a voluntary national certification exam designed to test a candidate's knowledge of psychiatric technology.

Job Outlook for Psychiatric Technicians:

As the nation's population ages and is affected by age-related changes in mental health, the demand for qualified psychiatric care providers, including psychiatric technicians, will continue to increase. Bureau of Labor Statistics data shows an anticipated ten-year increase in psychiatric technician jobs of 12.77 percent. Approximately 8,000 new and replacement job openings are expected to be available each year.

How Much Does a Psychiatric Technician Make:

Psychiatric Technicians rank #21 among our featured high-paying medical jobs with little schooling. They earn an average annual income of $38,080, ranging from $24,960 to $59,020.

Level of Experience Hourly Monthly Annual
Entry-Level $12.00 $2,080 $24,960
1-4 Years of Experience $13.78 $2,390 $28,660
5-9 Years of Experience $16.84 $2,920 $35,030
10-19 Years of Experience $21.16 $3,670 $44,020
20 Years or More Experience $28.38 $4,920 $59,020
Average Salary $18.31 $3,170 $38,080
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


22. Veterinary Technologist and Technician

Typical Education Needed for Entry:

Associate Degree

Typical On-The-Job Training Needed to Attain Competency:

None

Annual Job Openings:

10,400

10-Year Job Outlook:

+14.95%

Annual Salary Range:

$25,520 - $52,410

Highest Paying States:

Connecticut, Nevada, California, Massachusetts, Virginia, New York, Alaska, Washington, Illinois, and New Jersey

What is the Job Role of a Veterinary Technologist and Technician:

If you are searching for high-paying medical jobs with little schooling and have a love for animals, you may find the role of a veterinary technologist or technician is an interesting option. Veterinary Technologist/Technician roles may vary somewhat, depending on the need of the veterinary practice. Typical responsibilities of the veterinary technologist include taking animals' vital signs, drawing blood or gathering other specimens, and performing lab procedures. Vet technicians also prepare animals and equipment for general and surgical procedures, administer medications and vaccines as prescribed by the veterinarian, take and process x-rays, and educate pet owners.

Where Do Veterinary Technologists and Technicians Work:

Veterinary Technologists and Technicians primarily work in veterinarian offices. Other settings where they may work include colleges, universities, and other professional schools, advocacy groups, and scientific research and developmental services. Some pet boarding facilities employ Veterinary Techs, as well.

Workplace Employment
Other Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services 100,360
Colleges, Universities, and Professional Schools 3,480
Social Advocacy Organizations 1,510
Scientific Research and Development Services 940
Other Personal Services 770
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)

Schooling Requirements to Become a Veterinary Technologist and Technician:

The minimum education requirement to become a Veterinary Technologist/Technician is an associate degree in veterinary studies. Additionally, most states require entry-level Veterinary Tech candidates to pass a certification exam. The most used certification examination is the Veterinary Technician National Exam administered by the American Association of Veterinary State Boards.

Job Outlook for Veterinary Technologists and Technicians:

A career as a Veterinary Technologist is promising, with a projected outlook reflecting a 14.95% ten-year growth.

If this trend, as suggested by the B.L.S., continues to remain steady, there could be 10,400 new and replacement Veterinary Technologist and Technician jobs available every year.

How Much Does a Veterinary Technologist and Technician Make:

Veterinary Technologists and Technicians earn approximately $37,860 yearly, on average. New Vet Techs just entering the field usually begin their careers with salaries around $25,520. With each four to ten years of work experience, Veterinary Techs can expect to see salary increases that equal $5,000 or more annually.

Level of Experience Hourly Monthly Annual
Entry-Level $12.27 $2,130 $25,520
1-4 Years of Experience $14.44 $2,500 $30,030
5-9 Years of Experience $17.43 $3,020 $36,260
10-19 Years of Experience $21.10 $3,660 $43,890
20 Years or More Experience $25.20 $4,370 $52,410
Average Salary $18.20 $3,160 $37,860
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


23. Medical Transcriptionist

Typical Education Needed for Entry:

Post-secondary Non-Degree Award

Typical On-The-Job Training Needed to Attain Competency:

None

Annual Job Openings:

6,600

10-Year Job Outlook:

-7.44%

Annual Salary Range:

$21,790 - $55,220

Highest Paying States:

California, Minnesota, Connecticut, New Jersey, Vermont, Hawaii, Nebraska, Wyoming, Oklahoma, and Utah

What is the Job Role of a Medical Transcriptionist:

Medical Transcriptionists, also referred to as Healthcare Documentation Specialists, translate dictated recordings from physicians and other healthcare professionals into written reports, documents, and correspondence. Medical transcriptionists' responsibilities also include receiving, filing, and storing medical records, operating word processing, dictation, and transcription equipment, reviewing and editing transcribed reports for grammar, spelling consistency, and proper medical terminology.

Where Do Medical Transcriptionists Work:

Medical Transcriptionists work in physicians' offices, hospitals, laboratories, and outpatient care centers. Some work in business support services. Some medical transcriptionists work from home, either employed by a company, healthcare organization, or as freelance workers.

Workplace Employment
Business Support Services 16,650
Offices of Physicians 14,160
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 8,100
Medical and Diagnostic Laboratories 1,370
Outpatient Care Centers 1,220
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)

Schooling Requirements to Become a Medical Transcriptionist:

You can become a medical transcriptionist in as little as six months by completing a post-secondary certificate program in medical transcription. These programs include basic medical terminology, legal indications associated with medical record-keeping, and training on the use of basic transcription equipment.

Job Outlook for Medical Transcriptionists:

Although about 6,600 new and replacement job openings for medical transcriptionists are expected each year over this decade, the overall job outlook for this role indicates a 7.44 percent decline. Most sources cite the growth of speech recognition software and electronic health records as the major contributing factors for the decline in job growth of medical transcriptionists.

How Much Does a Medical Transcriptionist Make:

Medical Transcriptionist is one of the top high-paying medical jobs with little schooling that offers a comfortable income. The average yearly salary for medical transcriptionists nationwide is $37,310, equivalent to $17.94 hourly or $3,110 monthly. Salaries range from $21,790 for new, entry-level transcriptionists to $55,220 for more experienced ones. California, Minnesota, Connecticut, New Jersey, Vermont, Hawaii, Nebraska, Wyoming, Oklahoma, and Utah offer the highest wages for medical transcriptionists.

Level of Experience Hourly Monthly Annual
Entry-Level $10.48 $1,820 $21,790
1-4 Years of Experience $13.01 $2,260 $27,070
5-9 Years of Experience $16.96 $2,940 $35,270
10-19 Years of Experience $21.76 $3,770 $45,260
20 Years or More Experience $26.55 $4,600 $55,220
Average Salary $17.94 $3,110 $37,310
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


24. Phlebotomist

Typical Education Needed for Entry:

Post-secondary Non-Degree Award

Typical On-The-Job Training Needed to Attain Competency:

None

Annual Job Openings:

19,500

10-Year Job Outlook:

+22.22%

Annual Salary Range:

$26,690 - $50,740

Highest Paying States:

California, New York, Alaska, Washington, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Oregon, Delaware, Maryland, and Rhode Island

What is the Job Role of a Phlebotomist:

Phlebotomists are essential healthcare team members. They collect blood samples from patients, prepare samples for testing, and perform tests as ordered. The phlebotomist is responsible for verifying physicians' orders for lab tests, confirming patient information, collecting samples, and labeling samples properly.

Where Do Phlebotomists Work:

Phlebotomists are another of our featured high-paying medical jobs with little schooling. Phlebotomists work in a variety of healthcare settings. Outpatient clinics, physicians' offices, and ambulatory surgery centers are common places of employment for phlebotomists. Most phlebotomists work in medical and diagnostic laboratories and general medical and surgical hospitals.

Workplace Employment
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 48,990
Medical and Diagnostic Laboratories 38,980
Other Ambulatory Health Care Services 20,410
Offices of Physicians 9,250
Outpatient Care Centers 2,120
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)

Schooling Requirements to Become a Phlebotomist:

Becoming a phlebotomist is as simple as enrolling in a phlebotomy class at a local technical college or private institution offering training. Most phlebotomy programs last three to six months. The only states that require candidates to earn phlebotomy certification are California, Washington, Louisiana, and Nevada. However, employers typically prefer to hire certified phlebotomists. Options for phlebotomy certification include Phlebotomy Technician offered by the American Society for Clinical Pathology, Certified Phlebotomy Technician administered by the National Healthcareer Association, and Registered Phlebotomy Technician certification available from American Medical Technologists.

Job Outlook for Phlebotomists:

The job outlook for phlebotomists is impressive. This group of professionals anticipates more than a twenty percent job outlook. Approximately 19,500 new and replacement job openings are expected to be available each year.

How Much Does a Phlebotomist Make:

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, phlebotomists earn salaries ranging from $26,690 to $50,740. The average annual income is $37,280, which is equal to $17.92 hourly or $3,110 monthly.

Level of Experience Hourly Monthly Annual
Entry-Level $12.83 $2,220 $26,690
1-4 Years of Experience $14.72 $2,550 $30,610
5-9 Years of Experience $17.46 $3,030 $36,320
10-19 Years of Experience $20.25 $3,510 $42,130
20 Years or More Experience $24.39 $4,230 $50,740
Average Salary $17.92 $3,110 $37,280
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


25. Medical Assistant

Typical Education Needed for Entry:

Post-secondary Non-Degree Award

Typical On-The-Job Training Needed to Attain Competency:

None

Annual Job Openings:

104,400

10-Year Job Outlook:

+18.39%

Annual Salary Range:

$26,930 - $50,580

Highest Paying States:

Alaska, Washington, Massachusetts, Minnesota, California, Oregon, Connecticut, Hawaii, New York, and Colorado

What is the Job Role of a Medical Assistant:

Medical Assistants offer support services to physicians and other members of the healthcare team to ensure that healthcare facilities run smoothly. Medical Assistants perform administrative and clinical tasks, including maintaining accurate patient records, preparing examination rooms, and taking vital signs. They may help prepare patients for examinations or procedures and assist physicians or nurse practitioners with exams. Medical Assistants also perform desk duties such as answering phones, taking messages for healthcare team members, and scheduling patient appointments.

Where Do Medical Assistants Work:

More than 400,000 Medical Assistants work in physicians' offices. Other places of employment include surgical and general medical hospitals, outpatient clinics, assisted living facilities, retirement communities, and nursing homes.

Workplace Employment
Offices of Physicians 404,670
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 106,290
Outpatient Care Centers 59,610
Offices of Other Health Practitioners 56,810
Continuing Care Retirement Communities and
Assisted Living Facilities for the Elderly
13,930
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)

Schooling Requirements to Become a Medical Assistant:

While some people find jobs as Medical Assistants with only a high school diploma or G.E.D., those who earn a post-secondary certification in medical assisting typically find it easier to obtain employment. Most medical assistant programs are offered at community colleges or vocational schools. The American Association of Medical Assistants offers the Certified Medical Assistant exam and credential.

Job Outlook for Medical Assistants:

The job outlook for Medical Assistants is remarkable, with an estimated 18.39 percent growth over the next 10 years. Approximately 104,400 new and replacement job openings are expected to be available each year.

How Much Does a Medical Assistant Make:

With salary ranges between $26,930 and $50,580, Medical Assistants qualify as one of the high-paying medical jobs with little schooling. In as few as five years, Medical Assistants can experience a rise in income to more than $30,000. The average hourly pay is $17.75, equal to $3,080 monthly or $36,930 yearly.

Level of Experience Hourly Monthly Annual
Entry-Level $12.95 $2,240 $26,930
1-4 Years of Experience $14.60 $2,530 $30,360
5-9 Years of Experience $17.24 $2,990 $35,850
10-19 Years of Experience $19.85 $3,440 $41,280
20 Years or More Experience $24.32 $4,220 $50,580
Average Salary $17.75 $3,080 $36,930
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


26. Ophthalmic Laboratory Technician

Typical Education Needed for Entry:

High School Diploma or Equivalent

Typical On-The-Job Training Needed to Attain Competency:

Moderate-Term On-The-Job Training

Annual Job Openings:

4,000

10-Year Job Outlook:

+11.27%

Annual Salary Range:

$24,120 - $51,630

Highest Paying States:

New Hampshire, Maryland, Connecticut, Ohio, Arizona, Washington, Oregon, Vermont, California, and New Jersey

What is the Job Role of an Ophthalmic Laboratory Technician:

Ophthalmic Laboratory Technicians are also known as optical mechanics, optical goods workers, or manufacturing opticians. Most of their role revolves around making prescription eyeglasses and contact lenses. Some Ophthalmic Laboratory Technicians manufacture lenses for optical instruments such as binoculars or telescopes. These technicians cut, grind, edge, and finish lenses according to specifications prescribed by opticians, ophthalmologists, and optometrists. They also insert lenses into frames to produce finished eyeglasses.

Where Do Ophthalmic Laboratory Technicians Work:

Ophthalmic Laboratory Technicians usually work in laboratories, workshops, or eyeglass stores. They may work in personal care stores and physicians' offices. However, their contact with patients is typically limited, as they work behind the scenes preparing lenses.

Workplace Employment
Offices of Physicians 37,480
Offices of Other Health Practitioners 14,810
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 2,460
Health and Personal Care Stores 1,620
Outpatient Care Centers 1,480
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)

Schooling Requirements to Become an Ophthalmic Laboratory Technician:

Many employers hire Ophthalmic Laboratory Technicians with no post-secondary training, offering in-depth, on-the-job training. However, some candidates may choose to study ophthalmic laboratory technology in a certificate or associate degree program.

Job Outlook for Ophthalmic Laboratory Technicians:

The outlook for Ophthalmic Laboratory Technician jobs is favorable, with the projected growth rate at 11.27%, faster than other careers. Approximately 4,000 new and replacement job openings are expected to be available each year.

How Much Does an Ophthalmic Laboratory Technician Make:

Although they are not at the high end of the earning spectrum, Ophthalmic Laboratory Technicians still rank as some of the top high-paying medical jobs with little schooling.

Entry-level technicians earn about $2,000 per month or $24,120 yearly. With experience, income-earning opportunities increase. The most experienced Ophthalmic Laboratory Technicians earn more than $51,000 annually. Ophthalmic Laboratory Technicians living in New Hampshire, Maryland, Connecticut, Ohio, Arizona, Washington, Oregon, Vermont, California, and New Jersey earn the highest salaries for this specialty.

Level of Experience Hourly Monthly Annual
Entry-Level $11.60 $2,010 $24,120
1-4 Years of Experience $13.60 $2,360 $28,290
5-9 Years of Experience $16.56 $2,870 $34,440
10-19 Years of Experience $20.10 $3,480 $41,810
20 Years or More Experience $24.82 $4,300 $51,630
Average Salary $17.62 $3,050 $36,640
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


27. Pharmacy Technician

Typical Education Needed for Entry:

High School Diploma or Equivalent

Typical On-The-Job Training Needed to Attain Competency:

Moderate-Term On-The-Job Training

Annual Job Openings:

31,700

10-Year Job Outlook:

+3.96%

Annual Salary Range:

$25,400 - $50,430

Highest Paying States:

California, Alaska, Washington, Oregon, Hawaii, North Dakota, Minnesota, Nevada, Wyoming, and Massachusetts

What is the Job Role of a Pharmacy Technician:

Pharmacy Technicians work under the supervision of pharmacists. They dispense prescription and over-the-counter medication to customers. Some of their job responsibilities include assembling medications for prescriptions and providing information about medications to patients. Pharmacy Technicians often check and evaluate written prescriptions, verify and record patient information, and maintain patient privacy.

Where Do Pharmacy Technicians Work:

Pharmacy Technicians work in various settings. While many work in pharmacies, others work in health or personal care stores and general medical or surgical hospitals. Some Pharmacy Technicians work in food and beverage stores, electronic shopping and mail-order houses, and for merchant wholesalers who specialize in nondurable goods.

Workplace Employment
Health and Personal Care Stores 210,520
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 66,240
Food and Beverage Stores 41,960
Merchant Wholesalers, Nondurable Goods 14,260
Electronic Shopping and Mail-Order Houses 8,690
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)

Schooling Requirements to Become a Pharmacy Technician:

Most Pharmacy Technicians learn through on-the-job training, which is continuous throughout their careers. However, there are several technical diplomas and post-secondary certificate programs available for interested individuals. The Pharmacy Technician Certification Board (PTCB) offers opportunities for Pharmacy Technicians to earn the PTCB CPhT (Certified Pharmacy Technician) Certification.

Job Outlook for Pharmacy Technicians:

Pharmacy Technicians should see a steady increase in job opportunities. The B.L.S. estimates this job role will see a 3.96 percent throughout this decade. Approximately 31,700 new and replacement job openings are expected to be available each year.

How Much Does a Pharmacy Technician Make:

Like several other medical careers that pay well with little schooling featured in this article, Pharmacy Technicians earn comfortable incomes. Their salaries range between $25,400 and $50,430, with an average annual salary of $36,450.

Level of Experience Hourly Monthly Annual
Entry-Level $12.21 $2,120 $25,400
1-4 Years of Experience $13.99 $2,420 $29,090
5-9 Years of Experience $16.88 $2,930 $35,100
10-19 Years of Experience $20.03 $3,470 $41,660
20 Years or More Experience $24.25 $4,200 $50,430
Average Salary $17.52 $3,040 $36,450
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


28. Occupational Therapy Aide

Typical Education Needed for Entry:

High School Diploma or Equivalent

Typical On-The-Job Training Needed to Attain Competency:

Short-Term On-The-Job Training

Annual Job Openings:

900

10-Year Job Outlook:

+20.69%

Annual Salary Range:

$20,010 - $58,800

Highest Paying States:

New York, Utah, North Dakota, Maryland, Massachusetts, Missouri, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Virginia, and Colorado

What is the Job Role of an Occupational Therapy Aide:

Occupational Therapy Aides handle non-clinical jobs. They assemble equipment used in treating occupational therapy patients and prepare educational materials to be distributed to patients and families. Occupational Therapy Aide responsibilities may include answering phones, scheduling appointments, ordering and restocking supplies, verifying and filing insurance forms.

Where Do Occupational Therapy Aides Work:

Occupational Therapy Aides work in physicians' offices, specialty, general medical and surgical hospitals, and nursing homes. They may work for private therapy agencies, in pediatricians' offices, or in assisted living facilities.

Workplace Employment
Offices of Other Health Practitioners 2,530
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 1,020
Nursing Care Facilities 760
Specialty Hospitals 460
Offices of Physicians 150
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)

Schooling Requirements to Become an Occupational Therapy Aide:

Occupational Therapy Aides typically receive most of their training while working on the job with more experienced Occupational Therapy Aides.

Job Outlook for Occupational Therapy Aides:

The job outlook for Occupational Therapy Aides is promising. With anticipated growth in the field of more than twenty percent in the next decade, this is one of the medical careers that pay well with little schooling that is worth considering. The B.L.S. estimates at least nine hundred new and replacement Occupational Therapy Aide jobs will be available yearly.

How Much Does an Occupational Therapy Aide Make:

Entry-level Occupational Therapy Aides earn $9.62 per hour, averaging $20,010 annually. With five to ten years of work experience, they can see wage increases equaling $30,180 to $39,120 yearly. The average salary nationwide for Occupational Therapy Aides is $34,160, with the most experienced OTAs earning nearly $59,000 per year.

Level of Experience Hourly Monthly Annual
Entry-Level $9.62 $1,670 $20,010
1-4 Years of Experience $11.12 $1,930 $23,130
5-9 Years of Experience $14.51 $2,520 $30,180
10-19 Years of Experience $18.81 $3,260 $39,120
20 Years or More Experience $28.27 $4,900 $58,800
Average Salary $16.42 $2,850 $34,160
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


29. Dietetic Technician

Typical Education Needed for Entry:

Associate Degree

Typical On-The-Job Training Needed to Attain Competency:

None

Annual Job Openings:

2,200

10-Year Job Outlook:

+7.46%

Salary Range:

$20,980 - $49,000

Highest Paying States:

Oregon, Washington, Rhode Island, New York, Alaska, Indiana, Minnesota, California, Maryland, and Nevada

What is the Job Role of a Dietetic Technician:

Dietetic Technicians are wellness practitioners specializing in nutrition. They develop nutritional plans designed to promote health, treat illness, and prevent disease. Dietetic Technicians educate clients about the importance of food and its effects on health and wellness, helping them understand how to make wise food choices to promote a healthy life.

Where Do Dietetic Technicians Work:

Dietetic Technicians work in general medical and surgical hospitals, nursing facilities, continuing care retirement communities, and assisted living facilities. Some Dietetic Technicians work for local government agencies and in specialty hospitals, as well.

Workplace Employment
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 10,260
Nursing Care Facilities 9,840
Continuing Care Retirement Communities and
Assisted Living Facilities for the Elderly
2,370
Local Government, excluding schools and hospitals 1,310
Specialty Hospitals 640
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)

Schooling Requirements to Become a Dietetic Technician:

The minimum degree level required to become a Dietetic Technician is an associate degree from a program accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics. The Dietetic Technician program must include coursework in nutrition and diet therapy, medical nutrition therapy, food safety and sanitation practices, food management systems, and at least 450 hours of clinical internship.

Job Outlook for Dietetic Technicians:

Dietetic Technicians are expected to see a 7.46 percent increase in new jobs through 2030. Approximately 2,200 new and replacement job openings are expected each year.

How Much Does a Dietetic Technician Make:

Dietetic Technicians begin their careers with entry-level salaries of approximately $20,980 per year. By the time they achieve four years of experience, they can see an increase of nearly $5,000 annually. The most experienced Dietetic Technicians earn around $49,000 annually, with the average annual salary being $32,920.

Level of Experience Hourly Monthly Annual
Entry-Level $10.09 $1,750 $20,980
1-4 Years of Experience $12.25 $2,120 $25,490
5-9 Years of Experience $14.48 $2,510 $30,110
10-19 Years of Experience $18.31 $3,170 $38,090
20 Years or More Experience $23.56 $4,080 $49,000
Average Salary $15.83 $2,740 $32,920
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


30. Nursing Assistant

Typical Education Needed for Entry:

Post-secondary Non-Degree Award

Typical On-The-Job Training Needed to Attain Competency:

None

Annual Job Openings:

187,000

10-Year Job Outlook:

+8.26%

Salary Range:

$22,750 - $42,110

Highest Paying States:

Alaska, New York, California, Hawaii, Massachusetts, Oregon, Washington, Minnesota, Nort Dakota, and Connecticut

What is the Job Role of a Nursing Assistant:

Nursing Assistants, also referred to as Nurses' Aides, or Certified Nursing Assistants (C.N.A.s), provide direct, non-nursing care and support to patients in various healthcare settings. Nursing Assistants assess vital signs, monitor intake and output when ordered, and assist patients with activities of daily living.

Depending on the patient's needs, C.N.A.s may bathe, dress, and feed patients. Nursing Assistants report directly to the Licensed Practical Nurse or Registered Nurse, per their company's protocol.

Where Do Nursing Assistants Work:

Nursing Assistants work in several types of settings. The largest number of C.N.A.s, more than half a million, work in nursing care facilities such as nursing homes. C.N.A.s also work in hospitals, retirement communities, or assisted living facilities. Experienced Nursing Assistants often find employment opportunities in-home health services or for hospice agencies. Additionally, some families pay C.N.A.s to provide private care for loved ones in their homes.

Workplace Employment
Nursing Care Facilities 527,480
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 374,770
Continuing Care Retirement Communities and
Assisted Living Facilities for the Elderly
151,540
Home Health Care Services 77,300
Individual and Family Services 40,850
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)

Schooling Requirements to Become a Nursing Assistant:

To become a Nursing Assistant, candidates must have a high school diploma or equivalent and complete a nursing assistant training program. Each state's Board of Nursing oversees C.N.A. programs. After completing a Nursing Assistant program, individuals must pass a C.N.A. competency examination. When the C.N.A. competency exam is complete, and the candidate has passed, their name is placed on the state's C.N.A. registry, at which time they can legally be employed as a Nursing Assistant.

Job Outlook for Nursing Assistants:

The projected increase in Nursing Assistant jobs of 8.26% may not seem like much. However, the availability of 187,000 new and replacement job openings each year indicates that the demand for Nursing Assistants is quite favorable.

How Much Does a Nursing Assistant Make:

Nursing Assistants earn salaries ranging from $22,750 yearly at entry-level to $42,110 for the most experienced C.N.A.s. The average annual income for C.N.A.s is $32,050.

Level of Experience Hourly Monthly Annual
Entry-Level $10.94 $1,900 $22,750
1-4 Years of Experience $12.81 $2,220 $26,650
5-9 Years of Experience $14.83 $2,570 $30,850
10-19 Years of Experience $17.78 $3,080 $36,990
20 Years or More Experience $20.25 $3,510 $42,110
Average Salary $15.41 $2,670 $32,050
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)



What Additional Benefits Can I Expect In A High-Paying Medical Job With Little Schooling?


In addition to good income earning potential, the best-paying medical careers with little schooling often come with additional benefits. As you research jobs and consider offers, be sure to talk with prospective employers about benefits they offer in addition to the proposed salary. Some benefits you may receive could include employer-sponsored retirement plans, health insurance, paid sick leave, and paid vacation. Some employers offer financial assistance for employees to return to school to pursue a higher degree.


7 Ways To Decide Which High-Paying Medical Job With Little Schooling Suits You The Best?


You may know that you want a job in the medical field and that you don't want to go to school for an extended period. There is more to making the right choice than that, though. If you are on the fence about which of the best-paying medical careers with little schooling suits you, think about the following things.

1. Do you prefer a job where you provide patient care or is office or clerical work more to your liking?

Before choosing which career to pursue, consider the type of work you want to do. For example, if you want to provide hands-on patient care, you may enjoy being a Nursing Assistant or Licensed Practical Nurse. If you like the idea of talking with patients and being helpful, but a clinical role does not interest you, a job as a Dietetic Technician or Pharmacy Technician may be something you'd enjoy.

2. How much money do you want or need to make?

As you research the best-paying medical careers with little schooling, pay close attention to the earning potential of the jobs that interest you. Be sure to compare starting salaries of different jobs. Also, consider how much your income may increase as you gain more experience.

3. How much time do you want to commit to school/education?

Some high-paying medical jobs with little schooling do not require any post-secondary training but instead offer on-the-job training, which means you can start work quickly. Other options require technical diplomas or associate degrees, which can take up to two years to complete.

4. What schedule works best for you?

If you have school-aged children, you may prefer to work a day job so you can spend evenings with your family. On the other hand, individuals who do not have children or other obligations may be open to working evenings, nights, or rotating shifts. Consider what works best with your lifestyle and personal obligations and choose a career that fits well.

5. Do you plan on going back to school later to further your education?

Perhaps you have long-term career goals, such as becoming an optometrist or a registered nurse, but the timing is not right for you to commit to a lengthy academic plan. A terrific benefit of working in the medical field is that there is always room for growth and time to build your career to higher levels.

6. What type of environment would you like to work in?

It is crucial to choose a job that allows you to work in an environment where you feel comfortable. For example, if you like to work in a quiet area with little distraction, Medical Transcriptionist could be a good career choice. Conversely, if you like the idea of working with a peer group and don't mind doing some physical work, you may enjoy working as a Phlebotomist or a Psychiatric Aide.

7. Are you comfortable with physical labor?

Some high-paying medical careers with little schooling require little physical labor. Others can be physically demanding. Be honest about your physical abilities and choose a job you feel comfortable performing.


My Final Thoughts


In this article, we answered the question, "What are the top high-paying medical jobs with little schooling?" If you want a career in the medical field but are not ready to pursue a lengthy degree, the 30 top high-paying medical jobs with little schooling in 2022 featured in this article are excellent opportunities.


FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ANSWERED BY OUR EXPERT


1. Why Do Medical Jobs That Require Little Schooling Pay Well?

Medical jobs that require little schooling are important parts of the healthcare industry. These jobs pay well for several reasons, mainly because they involve patient care and the protection and promotion of healthcare and healthcare resources.


2. Can I Get A High-Paying Medical Job With Little Schooling And No Experience?

It is possible to get a high-paying medical job with little schooling and no prior experience. Most medical-related jobs, like the ones featured in this article, require clinical experiences while enrolled in the program and/or on-the-job training.


3. Are High-Paying Medical Jobs With Little Schooling Immune To Layoffs?

Unfortunately, no job is 100% immune to layoffs. Jobs in the medical field, however, tend to have fewer layoffs than other jobs.


4. Are High-Paying Medical Jobs With Little Schooling Secure?

The medical field is one of the most secure industries because direct patient care requires people to carry out the roles. One benefit to medical jobs that require little schooling is that you can build upon your knowledge and skills and earn higher degrees, which can help increase your potential for job security.


5. Are High-Paying Medical Jobs With Little Schooling Stressful?

Any job in the medical field can be stressful. It's important to keep in mind that this is true of non-medical careers, as well. It is necessary for anyone working in a medical job to learn and practice stress management techniques.


6. What 3 High-Paying Medical Jobs Require The Least Amount Of Schooling?

Pharmacy Technician, Community Health Worker, and Dental Assistant are three high-paying medical jobs that require the least amount of schooling. Each of these jobs requires a high school diploma or equivalent and may require a post-secondary certificate which can usually be earned in three months or less.


7. What Are The 3 Easiest High-Paying Medical Jobs With Little Schooling?

Three of the easiest high-paying medical careers with little schooling are Medical Assistant, Dental Assistant, and Medical Transcriptionist.


8. What Are The 3 Most Fun High-Paying Medical Jobs With Little Schooling?

Three of the most fun, high-paying medical jobs with little schooling are Veterinary Technologist and Technician, Occupational Therapy Assistant, and Physical Therapy Assistant.


9. What Are The 3 Most Popular High-Paying Medical Jobs With Little Schooling?

Three of the most popular high-paying medical jobs that require little schooling are Emergency Medical Technician and Paramedic, Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse, and Surgical Technologist.


10. What High-Paying Medical Jobs With Little Schooling Have The Best Job Outlook?

Occupational Therapy Assistant, Physical Therapist Assistant, Massage Therapist, Physical Therapist Aide, and Respiratory Therapist jobs are the high-paying medical jobs with little schooling that have the best job outlook. Ten-year projections indicate growth between 23.03% and 36.03%.

Rank Job Title Job Outlook
1 Occupational Therapy Assistant +36.03%
2 Physical Therapist Assistant +35.39%
3 Massage Therapist +32.16%
4 Physical Therapist Aide +25.27%
5 Respiratory Therapist +23.02%


11. What High-Paying Medical Jobs With Little Schooling Have The Most Number Of Annual Job Openings?

The high-paying medical jobs with little schooling that have the highest number of annual job openings projected include Nursing Assistant, Medical Assistant, Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse, Dental Assistant, and Pharmacy Technician. Nursing Assistants and Medical Assistants expect the most annual job openings with 187,000 and 104,400 expected respectively.

Rank Job Title Annual Job Openings
1 Nursing Assistant 187,000
2 Medical Assistant 104,400
3 Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurse 60,700
4 Dental Assistant 44,000
5 Pharmacy Technician 31,700



Darby Faubion BSN, RN
Darby Faubion is a nurse and Allied Health educator with over twenty years of experience. She has assisted in developing curriculum for nursing programs and has instructed students at both community college and university levels. Because of her love of nursing education, Darby became a test-taking strategist and NCLEX prep coach and assists nursing graduates across the United States who are preparing to take the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX).