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10 Pros and Cons of Being a Perinatal Nurse + Salary + Steps to Become


Written By: Jennifer Schlette MSN, RN

Being a perinatal nurse is no easy task. It is a task that requires a lot of energy, immense patience, and a never-ending supply of coffee. But being a perinatal nurse is also incredibly rewarding. It can be tough to deal with the stresses of the job, but there are also many benefits to being a perinatal nurse. This is why it is essential to understand what are the pros and cons of being a perinatal nurse.

Below you will, you will find the top 10 pros and cons of being a perinatal nurse + salary + steps to become a perinatal nurse. The information you will find below will be so valuable as you embark on this path of deciding if this is the career for you.


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What Exactly Is A Perinatal Nurse?


A perinatal nurse is a registered nurse who specializes in caring for women during pregnancy, childbirth, and the postpartum period. The role of a perinatal nurse is to provide education and support to pregnant women and their families. They also provide care for newborn babies and help with breastfeeding. They are also sometimes called obstetric nurses or maternity nurses.


What Does A Perinatal Nurse Do?


So let's dive into what does a perinatal nurse do. The duties of a perinatal nurse may vary depending on the facility in which you work. Below you will find the most common responsibilities of a perinatal nurse.

1. Assessment of the patient:

As a perinatal nurse, you will assess the patient and take vital signs. You will report any abnormal findings to the healthcare provider. You may also identify high-risk patients. This is an essential aspect of your job because it helps to ensure that the patient receives the best possible care.

2. Perform test:

Performing tests is an essential duty that you will be tasked with as a perinatal nurse. To ensure the health and safety of both mother and child, it is important to be well-versed in the various tests that are commonly performed during pregnancy.

One of the most common tests you will perform is a blood draw. This is usually done to check for anemia or infection. Urine tests are also commonly performed to check for protein levels and sugar levels.

Another important test you will perform is the non-stress test. This is a fetal monitoring test used to assess the baby's well-being. It is vital to be familiar with this test to correctly interpret the results.

3. Education:

Education is a crucial component of the duties you will be tasked with. As a perinatal nurse, you will need to provide education for your patients on various topics related to pregnancy, childbirth, and newborn care. This education should be tailored to each patient's individual needs, as every pregnancy is different. You will need to be able to explain things in layman's terms, as many of your patients will be first-time mothers who may be feeling overwhelmed. It is vital to make sure that your patients feel comfortable and confident in their ability to care for themselves and their new babies.

4. Assist in birth:

Assisting the healthcare provider in the delivery of a baby is one of the most critical roles that a perinatal nurse can play. Providing emotional support to the mother and their support person during this time and helping with the physical aspects of the birth are essential parts of this job.

5. Assist in obstetrical procedures:

As always, the mother and baby's safety is of paramount importance during an obstetrical procedure. Perinatal nurses work closely with the obstetrician to ensure that all procedures are carried out safely.

There are many types of obstetrical procedures that perinatal nurses may be called upon to assist with. These can include everything from simple vaginal exams and cervical checks to more complex procedures like amniocentesis.

6. Teach infant feeding:

A perinatal nurse may teach a mother how to breastfeed her infant. They may also provide information on bottle-feeding if the mother chooses to formula feed. The perinatal nurse will help the mother understand the benefits of both breastfeeding and bottle feeding so the patient can make the best decision for her and her baby.

7. Postpartum discharge:

As a perinatal nurse, you will ensure that the patient understands what to expect after the baby is born. You will teach the patient and their family about postpartum care. You will also teach the patient how to care for themselves and their baby. The perinatal nurse will also help the patient to understand any changes that they may experience after the birth of their baby.


Where Does A Perinatal Nurse Work?


When deciding if you want to become a perinatal nurse, the setting you will be working in is a significant factor. Depending on the place of work, your responsibilities could be very different. Here are some of the areas where you could end up working as a perinatal nurse:

1. Labor, delivery, and postpartum unit:

As a perinatal nurse, you may find yourself working in the hospital setting. In this type of setting, you will be providing care for pregnant women and their newborn babies. This can be a gratifying career, as you will be helping to bring new life into the world.

You may also find yourself caring for women and their families that may be navigating through one of the most challenging times of their lives. Remember, not everyone will leave the hospital with a healthy baby or a healthy mother. You will need to be able to provide support and care for all of your patients, no matter what the outcome may be.

2. Private Practices:

You will find perinatal nurses working in private practice. A perinatal nurse may work with an OB/GYN or a midwife in the private practice setting. These nurses provide care for pregnant women and their families during the prenatal, labor, and postpartum periods.

A perinatal nurse in private practice may also provide well-woman care, such as Pap smears and breast exams. In addition, they may offer education and support to families who are expecting a baby.

3. Home health services:

A perinatal nurse who works in-home health services will provide care for pregnant women and new mothers. In this type of setting, you will deliver home visits to patients in their homes. These visits will focus on providing education, support, and guidance during the pregnancy and postpartum periods. Perinatal nurses working in home health services must be able to work independently and must have excellent communication skills.

4. Community health organizations:

As a perinatal nurse working in community health organizations, you will often be the first person a pregnant woman or new mother comes into contact with. You will provide them with information, support, and care during this critical time in their lives.

Your role will vary depending on your organization. Still, it may include providing ante-natal and post-natal care, teaching parenting classes, working with at-risk families, and supporting new mothers.

5. Birth centers:

One setting that utilizes the skills of a perinatal nurse is a birth center. Birth centers are places where women can come to receive care during their pregnancies and during the postpartum period. Perinatal nurses here work closely with obstetricians, midwives, and other health care providers to ensure that each woman receives the best possible care.

The perinatal nurse is responsible for providing care to the mother and baby during the birth process. This includes monitoring the mother's labor, providing support and information to the family, and helping to ensure that the baby is born healthy. In addition, the perinatal nurse is responsible for providing care to the mother and baby during the post-partum period.

6. Medical Evacuation and Transport Services:

Medical evacuation and transport services are other settings where you can find a perinatal nurse working. This is an excellent option for those perinatal nurses who want to help transport mothers and babies to safety in the event of an emergency. These services are vital in many areas, especially during natural disasters or other situations where hospitals may be inaccessible. As a perinatal nurse working in this setting, you will be responsible for providing care to mothers and babies during transport.


What Is The Typical Work Schedule Of A Perinatal Nurse?


As a perinatal nurse, your schedule will depend on the setting you work in. If you work in the hospital setting, you could find yourself working ten to twelve-hour shifts. You could be working any combination of days. This would include weekend and night shifts. Perinatal nurses who work in the community, home health, transport, or birthing centers will also find themselves working a rotating schedule with long hours, weekends and nights.

If you work in private practice, your schedule will be much more regular. You will typically work five days a week in this type of setting. Each day you will be working eight hours. Generally, in this type of setting, you would not be working weekends, holidays, or nights.


What Are The Most Important Skills And Abilities Required To Successfully Work As A Perinatal Nurse?


If you plan on becoming a perinatal nurse, you must have the skills to adequately perform your job. Below you find the most essential skills that you will need to become a perinatal nurse.

1. Communication:

A perinatal nurse's work involves a great deal of communication, written and oral. You will need to communicate effectively with patients, families, and other healthcare providers. Perinatal nurses must explain complex medical information in a way that is easy to understand. They also need to listen to their patients and understand their concerns. Effective communication is essential for providing high-quality care to perinatal patients.

2. Empathy:

As a perinatal nurse, it is essential to have empathy when working with patients and their families. It can be a difficult time for them, and they may be feeling a range of emotions. Having empathy will help you understand what they are going through and provide them with the best possible care.

3. Patience:

One of the most essential qualities of a perinatal nurse is patience. Patience is necessary when you are working with families and newborns. You need to have patience when working with the different personalities and needs of each family. You also need to be patient when working with the various medical staff. Each staff member has their own way of doing things, and you need to be able to work with them. Every aspect of your job as a perinatal nurse will require patience.

4. Compassion and support:

As perinatal nurses, compassion and the ability to provide support to the family are essential qualities. You will be working with families during one of the most vulnerable and stressful times in their lives.

It is crucial to be able to provide care and support that is tailored to each individual family's needs. Perinatal nurses need to understand the physical and emotional changes that occur during pregnancy and childbirth. They also need to be able to provide support to families who may be coping with difficult situations, such as a high-risk pregnancy or the death of a baby.

5. Collaboration:

The ability to collaborate with others is an essential aspect of perinatal nursing. Perinatal nurses need to work effectively with other members of the healthcare team to provide the best care for their patients. Collaboration is critical to keep the mother and baby safe throughout the prenatal, birthing, and post-partum process.

6. Teaching:

Teaching is an essential aspect of your job as a perinatal nurse. You will need to be able to teach effectively in order to help your patients and their families understand the vital information about their pregnancy, labor, and delivery, as well as caring for a newborn. Education is key to ensuring that your patients have a positive and healthy experience during this particular time in their lives.

7. Technical skills:

As a perinatal nurse, you will be responsible for caring for women during pregnancy and childbirth. This includes assessing the patient, monitoring the fetus, and providing support during labor and delivery. To be successful in this role, you must have strong technical skills.

Technical skills will include being able to read and interpret fetal heart monitors. You will also need to be able to assess the mother's condition and make recommendations for her care. These skills ensure that the mother and child have a safe and healthy delivery.

8. Critical thinking:

Critical thinking is essential for a perinatal nurse. This is because they need to be able to assess each situation and make the best decisions for their patients. At any point, your patient could go into labor or have complications, so you need to be able to think quickly and make the best decisions for them. This is why critical thinking skills are so crucial for a perinatal nurse.


How Much Does A Perinatal Nurse Make?


The average perinatal nurse salary is $99,549 a year. This means that you will be earning an hourly wage of $47.86 or $8,300 a month. As a perinatal nurse, your salary will grow with your experience level. So, let's look at how much a perinatal nurse makes based on experience.

The entry-level salary for a perinatal nurse is $66,450 a year. This will break down to $5,540 a month or $31.95 an hour. Once you have gained more experience and have been in the field for anywhere from one to four years, you can expect an hourly wage of $36.87. This means your monthly income will increase to $6,390 or an annual salary of $76,680. After working for anywhere from five to nine years as a perinatal nurse, you will be earning $93,730 annually. This figure will have you earning $7,810 a month or $45.06 an hour.

When you have been in the field for anywhere from ten to nineteen years, your monthly income will increase to $9,700 or an hourly rate of $55.99. This means you will be earning a six-figure salary of $116,450. Perinatal nurses who have twenty years or more of experience will be making an annual salary of $144,610. This is an hourly rate of $69.52 or a monthly income of $12,050.

Level of Experience HourlyMonthlyAnnual
Entry-Level $31.95$5,540$66,450
1-4 Years of Experience $36.87$6,390$76,680
5-9 Years of Experience $45.06$7,810$93,730
10-19 Years of Experience $55.99$9,700$116,450
20 Years or More Experience $69.52$12,050$144,610
Average Salary$47.86$8,300$99,549


Is There A Demand For Perinatal Nurses?


Before entering into a career, it is essential to know if there is a demand for your chosen profession. After all, you want to be able to find a job once you have completed your education and training! So, is there a demand for perinatal nurses? The short answer is yes, there is definitely a demand for perinatal nurses! The reasons behind this demand are two-fold.

1. Growing population:

This means that more babies are being born, and thus there is a greater need for perinatal nurses. The growing population is one of the main reasons why the demand for perinatal nurses is increasing. Perinatal nurses are in high demand because they play a vital role in caring for pregnant women and their unborn babies. They provide essential care before, during, and after childbirth.

2. Medical advances:

This means that more high-risk pregnancies are surviving. This means an increased need for nurses who specialize in caring for mothers and babies during this critical time. There has been a dramatic increase in the number of babies born prematurely in recent years. This is due, in part, to advances in medical technology that have made it possible to detect potential problems early on in pregnancy.

However, it also means that more babies are being born prematurely, which can be a challenging time for them. These babies often need special care to survive and thrive. That is where perinatal nurses who specialize in caring for mothers and babies during this critical time come in.


What Is The Step-By-Step Process To Become A Perinatal Nurse?


1. The first step in becoming a perinatal nurse is earning a degree in nursing. You could choose to earn either your associate's degree in nursing or your bachelor's degree in nursing. Keep in mind that the bachelor's degree is more versatile. It is the degree of choice for many healthcare institutions.

2. Next, you will need to successfully pass the National Certification Licensure Exam (NCLEX-RN).

3. You will then need to earn some pertinent certifications. These include Basic Life Support (BLS), Advanced Cardiac Life support (ACLS), and Neonatal resuscitation (NRP)

4. You can then consider earning your Maternal Newborn Nursing Certification, Inpatient Obstetric Nursing Certification, or your Neonatal Intensive Care Nursing Certification.



TOP CONS OF BEING A PERINATAL NURSE


(The following are the top 10 disadvantages of being a Perinatal Nurse.)

1. Your job can be sad at times.

One of the cons of being a perinatal nurse is that you will be present for some pretty sad times. This may include working with families who have experienced fetal demise, genetic defects, infertility, or terminations. These situations can leave you feeling pretty emotionally drained. It is entirely understandable why some people cannot handle this type of job. If you are the type of person who cannot take feeling sad or upset, then perinatal nursing is probably not the right field for you.

2. I hope you are in good shape.

Being a perinatal nurse can be physically demanding. You will need to be in good shape to be able to handle the demands of the job. During labor, you will be bending, pushing, and lifting. If you are not in good shape, you can become injured. If you become incapacitated, you can find yourself out of work or unable to adequately perform your job.

3. You may not get to work the shift you want.

One of the top cons of being a perinatal nurse is that you may not get to work the shifts you want. You might be stuck working nights, weekends, or holidays. This means you will be missing out on important moments with your family and friends. You can never get that time back.

4. Not every baby will survive delivery.

One of the biggest disadvantages of being a perinatal nurse is that not every baby will survive delivery. This can be incredibly heartbreaking, significantly if you have grown attached to the family during the pregnancy. Even the healthiest pregnancies and the healthiest babies can sometimes result in tragedy, which all perinatal nurses have to accept.

5. Not every woman will survive a delivery.

Labor and delivery are considered critical care environments where anything can happen. Sometimes even with the best care, things can go wrong, and a mother may not survive. This is something that every perinatal nurse must be prepared for. While it is a tragic event, it is also a reality of the job.

6. Hope you do not mind getting dirty

Another one of the disadvantages of being a perinatal nurse is that you will get dirty. You will be exposed to blood, emesis, and lots of other body fluids. All of these substances have the potential to fall on you. This can be a bit of a turnoff for some people, but it is something that you will just have to deal with if you want to pursue this career.

7. Complications can occur in an instant.

Complications can occur in a heartbeat. This can be a highly stressful part of your job. You may have a patient who is experiencing a placenta abruption or a massive postpartum hemorrhage. These are life-threatening events that can happen suddenly and without warning. As a perinatal nurse, it is essential to be prepared for these events and know how to handle them.

8. You can become burned out.

Burnout is a significant concern for perinatal nurses. The National Perinatal Association reports that nearly one in three nurses experience burnout. The signs of burnout include physical and emotional exhaustion, cynicism and detachment, and feelings of inadequacy and ineffectiveness. Burnout can lead to a number of negative consequences, including poor patient care, errors, accidents, and increased health care costs.

9. You may miss your breaks.

Your days may be filled with chaos and constant motion; you never know when a patient will go into labor or need your help. This can often lead to skipping meals or not getting proper rest. This can impact you negatively, both physically and mentally.

10. I hope you have some good stamina.

Another one of the cons of being a perinatal nurse is that you will be on your feet all day. This can be hard on your feet, legs and back. You may get tired more quickly and need to take more breaks than you did pre-pregnancy. You may also have to deal with swollen ankles and varicose veins. Unfortunately, your job will just not allow for that much sitting. So, if you do not have the stamina, this is not the job for you.



TOP PROS OF BEING A PERINATAL NURSE


(The following are the top 10 advantages of being a Perinatal Nurse.)

1. The pay is great

One of the pros of being a perinatal nurse is that you will make a great living. The average salary for a perinatal nurse is $99,549 per year. That is a lot of money! And it is only going to grow as the demand for perinatal nurses increases. So if you are thinking about becoming a nurse, you should definitely consider specializing in perinatal nursing. Think of all the perks that come with earning an excellent salary. You will be able to live a comfortable life, have a nice car, and save up for a rainy day.

2. You have various settings to choose from

As a perinatal nurse, you will have various settings to work in. You could find yourself working in a hospital, clinic, home health setting, or even private practice. You will be able to find a setting that best fits your lifestyle and career goals. Whichever setting you choose, you will be able to provide quality care to mothers and babies.

3. You are part of bringing a new life into the world

One of the top pros of being a perinatal nurse is that you will be a part of bringing a new life into the world. You will get to witness firsthand the miracle of childbirth and help support families during one of the most unique and intense experiences of their lives. It's a gratifying profession, both emotionally and spiritually.

4. You get to witness the beginning of a family.

As a perinatal nurse, you get to witness the beginnings of a family. You see, the first time parents hold their baby, the first time they feed their baby, and the first time they change a diaper. It's a special time for the family, and you get to be a part of it.

You get to be part of the excitement, the happiness, and sometimes the worry. But it's all worth it when you see the family leave the hospital with their new baby and a smile on their face.

5. You can travel to the United States.

Another one of the pros of being a perinatal nurse is you can travel the United States as a travel nurse. You can pick up assignments in different states and even in different parts of the country. This is a great way to see different parts of the country and experience different cultures. It is also a great way to meet new people and make new friends.

Perinatal nurses are a vital part of the healthcare team and are in high demand. This means that there are always opportunities for travel nurses. If you are a perinatal nurse and are looking for a change of scenery, working as a travel nurse may be the perfect option.

6. There is a lot of potential if you wish to advance your career

As a perinatal nurse, there are many potentials if you wish to advance your career. You could become a nurse practitioner, certified lactation consultant, or nursing administrator. But what if you want to stay in the perinatal field? There are still plenty of opportunities for you to advance your career.

7. You can never describe your job as boring.

An advantage of being a perinatal nurse is that you will never get bored. Every day is different and brings new challenges. You will get to know so many other families and help them through one of the most amazing times in their lives. No two days are ever the same!

8. You can feel great about the work you are doing.

As a perinatal nurse, you can feel great about your work. The result can sometimes be challenging, but it is also very rewarding. You get to help new families during one of the most important times in their lives.

You play a vital role in the health and well-being of mothers and babies. You provide care and support during pregnancy, labor and delivery, and postpartum. You can accomplish feats that not many people can. You are a superhero!

9. You will be part of a team.

Another advantage of being a perinatal nurse is that you will be part of a team. You will have the opportunity to work with other nurses dedicated to helping mothers and their babies. This team atmosphere can be enriching, as you will celebrate victories together.

10. The education you are providing to families will be invaluable.

As a perinatal nurse, you play a vital role in educating families about the early stages of parenthood. The information and support you provide will be invaluable to them as they navigate this new phase of life. You will be their go-to source of knowledge and guidance, from breastfeeding tips to advise on coping with sleep deprivation. And as you help them navigate these early days, you will be helping to set them up for success as they begin their journey into parenthood.



BREAKING DOWN THE SALARY OF A PERINATAL NURSE


What Is The Starting Salary Of A Perinatal Nurse?


The starting salary of a perinatal nurse is $66,450 a year. This means that your hourly rate will be $31.95 or a weekly income of $1,278. This means that you will be earning $5,540 a month.

Hourly$31.95
Weekly $1,278
Monthly$5,540
Annual$66,450


What Is The Average Salary Of A Perinatal Nurse?


The average perinatal nurse salary is $99,549 a year. This average annual salary will equate to $8,300 a month or $1,914 a week. You will be making an hourly rate of $47.86.

Hourly$47.86
Weekly $1,914
Monthly$8,300
Annual$99,549
(Source: Glassdoor.com)


What Is The Average Perinatal Nurse Salary In Your State?


So, your salary will vary depending on your years of experience. Still, it will also vary depending on where you live. For example, a perinatal nurse who works in Alabama will earn a monthly income of $6,250 and an annual salary of $74,940. Now, you will be making almost double in California for the exact same job. Your monthly income will be $12,500 or $150,000 a year in California.

State Hourly Monthly Annual
Alabama $36.03 $6,250 $74,940
Alaska $56.99 $9,880 $118,540
Arizona $48.08 $8,330 $100,010
Arkansas $38.07 $6,600 $79,180
California $72.12 $12,500 $150,000
Colorado $46.57 $8,070 $96,870
Connecticut $50.75 $8,800 $105,570
Delaware $44.46 $7,710 $92,480
Florida $41.58 $7,210 $86,480
Georgia $42.77 $7,410 $88,970
Hawaii $62.71 $10,870 $130,430
Idaho $42.85 $7,430 $89,130
Illinois $44.60 $7,730 $92,770
Indiana $40.37 $7,000 $83,970
Iowa $37.43 $6,490 $77,850
Kansas $38.40 $6,660 $79,880
Kentucky $38.72 $6,710 $80,540
Louisiana $40.68 $7,050 $84,620
Maine $42.50 $7,370 $88,390
Maryland $48.80 $8,460 $101,510
Massachusetts $57.57 $9,980 $119,750
Michigan $44.25 $7,670 $92,050
Minnesota $48.43 $8,390 $100,730
Mississippi $36.64 $6,350 $76,210
Missouri $39.42 $6,830 $81,990
Montana $42.19 $7,310 $87,750
Nebraska $41.56 $7,200 $86,450
Nevada $53.69 $9,310 $111,670
New Hampshire $45.44 $7,880 $94,520
New Jersey $51.27 $8,890 $106,650
New Mexico $45.28 $7,850 $94,190
New York $53.69 $9,310 $111,680
North Carolina $41.25 $7,150 $85,790
North Dakota $41.65 $7,220 $86,630
Ohio $41.72 $7,230 $86,780
Oklahoma $39.84 $6,910 $82,860
Oregon $57.56 $9,980 $119,730
Pennsylvania $44.37 $7,690 $92,280
Rhode Island $49.52 $8,580 $103,010
South Carolina $40.16 $6,960 $83,540
South Dakota $36.47 $6,320 $75,850
Tennessee $38.36 $6,650 $79,780
Texas $45.94 $7,960 $95,560
Utah $42.09 $7,300 $87,550
Vermont $43.15 $7,480 $89,760
Virginia $44.49 $7,710 $92,540
Washington $54.62 $9,470 $113,610
West Virginia $38.96 $6,750 $81,040
Wisconsin $44.72 $7,750 $93,020
Wyoming $43.43 $7,530 $90,330



HIGHEST PAID PERINATAL NURSES IN THE NATION


What Are The 10 Highest Paying States For Perinatal Nurses?


So, let’s now take a look at the highest paying states for perinatal nurses. California will lead the pack of the highest paying states for perinatal nurses. In this state, you will be earning $150,000 annually. Hawaii is the second highest paying state for perinatal nurses, with an annual salary of $130,430. In Massachusetts, Oregon, Alaska, Washington, New York, and Nevada, you will be earning anywhere from $111,000 a year to almost $120,000 a year. New Jersey and Connecticut will have you making an annual salary between $105,000 to $106,000 a year.

Rank State Average
Annual Salary
1 California $150,000
2 Hawaii $130,430
3 Massachusetts $119,750
4 Oregon $119,730
5 Alaska $118,540
6 Washington $113,610
7 New York $111,680
8 Nevada $111,670
9 New Jersey $106,650
10 Connecticut $105,570


What Are The 10 Highest Paying Metros For Perinatal Nurses?


Within California, you will find the highest paying metros for perinatal nurses. San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, CA, is the highest paying metro for perinatal nurses. Here you can potentially earn $185,640 a year. San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA, is not far behind, with an annual earning of $182,740. Redding, CA will bottom out of the top ten highest paying metros for perinatal nurses. Here you will be earning a yearly income of $139,180 a year.

Rank Metro Average
Annual Salary
1 San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, CA $185,640
2 San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA $182,740
3 Vallejo-Fairfield, CA $176,850
4 Sacramento--Roseville--Arden-Arcade, CA $167,160
5 Salinas, CA $164,430
6 Santa Rosa, CA $155,330
7 Modesto, CA $150,660
8 Stockton-Lodi, CA $144,150
9 Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, CA $140,740
10 Redding, CA $139,180


Top Organizations And Associations For Perinatal Nurses


Association of Women, Health Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses: This organization strives to support those who are caring for women, their families, and newborns. This goal is achieved through research, education, and advocacy. This organization provides an abundance of continuing education courses as well as resources on professional development.

National Association of Neonatal Nurses: NANN is dedicated to providing you with the tools in order to advance your career and evolve the profession. The goal of this organization is education, research, advocacy, and membership engagement.


My Final Thoughts


So, there you have it, the top 10 pros and cons of being a perinatal nurse + salary + steps to become one. Perinatal nurses enjoy many rewards, such as helping women through one of the most important times in their lives, being able to work with babies, and forming close bonds with their patients. However, there are also some challenges to this career path. The hours can be long and unpredictable, working on holidays is common, and it can be emotionally draining.

I hope the pros and cons of being a perinatal nurse presented in this article have helped you decide if this is the career path for you. Ultimately, only you can decide if being a perinatal nurse is right for you.


FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ANSWERED BY OUR EXPERT


1. Is Perinatal Nursing A Good Career?

Yes, perinatal nursing is actually a great field. You can take pride in what you do. Not only are you earning an excellent salary, but you are a part of one of the most important days of a person's life.


2. On Average, How Much Does A Perinatal Nurse Make Per Hour?

The average perinatal nurse's salary per hour is around $47.86 an hour.

$47.86


3. How Many Hours A Week Does A Perinatal Nurse Work?

The number of hours that a perinatal nurse works a week is dependent on what type of setting you work in. The average number of hours you will be working is between 37.5 and 40 hours a week if you are a full-time employee.

Part-time employees will work somewhere around twenty hours a week. If you are a per diem employee, the number of hours will depend upon your agreed contract with the institution you work for.


4. Is Being A Perinatal Nurse Stressful?

Yes, being a perinatal nurse can be stressful at times. Anytime there are complications, the mother's life and the baby's life may be on the line. The critical care environment that is perinatal nursing will have its moments where the job stressors may impact you.


5. Do I Need To Be Certified To Work As A Perinatal Nurse?

Some certifications will be mandatory to work as a perinatal nurse. Others will be recommended and often preferred by some healthcare institutions.


6. What Certifications Are Required Or Recommended For A Perinatal Nurse?

The required certifications to be a perinatal nurse are Basic Life Support (BLS), Advanced Cardiac Life support (ACLS), and Neonatal resuscitation (NRP). The recommended certifications will include Maternal Newborn Nursing Certification, Inpatient Obstetric Nursing Certification, or your Neonatal Intensive Care Nursing Certification.


7. How Long Does It Take To Become A Perinatal Nurse?

The length of time it takes to become a perinatal nurse will depend on the degree you plan to pursue. If you plan to earn your associate's degree in nursing, you will need two years to make the degree. If you plan to achieve your bachelor's degree in nursing, you are looking at four years to become a perinatal nurse.


8. How Much Does It Cost To Become A Perinatal Nurse?

An associate's degree in nursing will cost you anywhere from $6,000 - $150,000. If you choose to pursue a bachelor's degree in nursing, you will be spending anywhere from $20,000 - $200,000


9. What Kind Of Career Advancement Opportunities Are There For Perinatal Nurses?

As a perinatal nurse, you will have many opportunities for career advancement. You could earn an advanced degree in education and become a nurse educator. You could earn an advanced degree in administration and become a nursing administrator.

If you feel that you still want to practice at the bedside, you could earn an advanced practice degree and become a nurse practitioner. You could also continue to further your education and earn your doctorate degree.


10. What Are The 5 Most Common Perinatal Nurse Interview Questions?

1. What made you want to pursue a career as a perinatal nurse?
2. What is your most outstanding professional achievement?
3. What goals have you set for yourself?
4. Why do you feel you would be an excellent addition to this environment?
5. Tell me how you perform under pressure?



11. Do Perinatal Nurses Deliver Babies?

Perinatal nurses do not directly deliver babies. Their role is to assist the physician or the midwife in the safe delivery of the baby.


12. What Are 2 Of The Main Duties Of A Perinatal Nurse?

The first primary duty of the perinatal nurse is to assess the mother and baby for any abnormal or unexpected complications. The second primary duty of the perinatal nurse is to alert the healthcare provider of these complications so that interventions can begin.


13. What Is The Difference Between A Perinatal Nurse And A Neonatal Nurse?

The difference between a perinatal and a neonatal nurse is where the nurse can work. A perinatal nurse can care for the mother and the child. A perinatal nurse can work in a Neonatal intensive care unit if needed. However, a neonatal nurse can not work with a patient before, during, and after pregnancy. These nurses care for the baby typically up to twenty-eight days of life.


14. What Other Healthcare Professionals Do Perinatal Nurses Work With?

Perinatal nurses will work with obstetricians, neonatologists, nurse practitioners, and midwives. You will also find them working closely with technicians such as phlebotomists and ultrasound technicians.


15. What Is The Difference Between Perinatal And Prenatal?

The terms perinatal and prenatal are sometimes used interchangeable, but in reality, they are two different terms that should be used separately. Prenatal refers to the period of time before birth. This is when the expectant mother will come for checkups and monitoring before the baby's birth. Perinatal, on the other hand, refers to the time around birth. This term is also used in the time immediately after the birth.


16. When Does The Perinatal Period Begin And End?

The perinatal period is defined as the 28 weeks of pregnancy until one week after birth.


17. How Long Is The Neonatal Period?

The neonatal period lasts from birth up to 28 days of life.


Jennifer Schlette MSN, RN
Jennifer Schlette is a registered nurse in pediatric critical care in New York City. She is the former Director of Undergraduate Nursing at a college located in New York. After obtaining her BSN from the College of Mount Saint Vincent, she went on to complete her MSN.