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10 Pros and Cons of Being a Nutrition Nurse + Salary + Steps to Become


Written By: Jennifer Schlette MSN, RN

If you are passionate about helping people live healthier lives through proper nutrition, then a career as a nutrition nurse may be perfect for you! But before making the switch, it is essential to know what to expect. Do you know what are the pros and cons of being a nutrition nurse? If you are debating whether or not to become a nutrition nurse, you will want to read this list of pros and cons.

Here are the top 10 pros and cons of being a nutrition nurse, plus information on salary and steps to becoming one to help you determine if this is a career for you.


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What Exactly Is A Nutrition Nurse?


A nutrition nurse is a professional registered nurse who helps people to maintain a healthy diet and lifestyle. Nutrition nurses work with patients of all ages, from infants to the elderly. As a nutrition nurse, you will provide education and counseling on nutrition and health, and work to create individualized meal plans that meet each patient's unique needs. You will also often collaborate with other healthcare providers, such as dietitians and physicians, to ensure that patients receive the best possible care. Wherever you work, you will play a vital role in promoting good health and preventing disease.


What Does A Nutrition Nurse Do?


So, what does a nutrition nurse do? You will work with all different populations. Ultimately, your goal will be to help people live healthier lives by making better food choices. Below you will find the duties of a nutrition nurse.

1. Educate people about healthy living:

As a Nutrition nurse, you will educate people about healthy living. You will teach them about the importance of a balanced diet and how to make healthy food choices. You will also teach them the importance of exercise and how to incorporate it into their lives. In addition, you will provide support and guidance to help them make lifestyle changes that will improve their health. As a Nutrition nurse, you will be satisfied knowing that you are helping people live healthier lives.

2. You will work with individuals with special dietary needs:

As a Nutrition nurse, you will work with people with nutritional needs. For example, you may work with pregnant women who need to ensure they are getting enough nutrients or with people who are intolerant to gluten or lactose. No matter the dietary need, you will be responsible for providing advice and guidance on how to meet it. This can involve anything from teaching patients how to cook nutritious meals to help them choose the right foods when they are eating out.

3. You will work in research and development:

As a Nutrition nurse, you will work in research and development to ensure that patients receive the best nutrition. You will work with a team of dietitians and physicians to develop new diets and menus for patients, and monitor and evaluate existing ones.

4. You will design individual nutrition plans:

As a Nutrition nurse, you will be responsible for creating individual nutrition plans for patients. This will involve working with the patient to assess their current diet and health needs and then developing a plan that meets their specific needs. You will also need to be able to keep up with the latest research in the field of nutrition to provide the most up-to-date advice to your patients.

5. You will promote public health:

As a Nutrition nurse, you will promote public health by providing information and education on healthy eating, food safety, and portion control. You will also work with individuals and families to develop meal plans that meet their needs and preferences.

6. You will develop programs:

As a Nutrition nurse, you will develop programs that teach people how to eat healthily. You will use your knowledge of nutrition to help people prevent and treat diseases. You also educate people about the importance of eating healthy foods.

7. You will assist individuals in losing weight:

As a Nutrition nurse, you are uniquely positioned to help people suffering from obesity. You have the knowledge and skills to help them make lifestyle changes that will lead to long-term weight loss. You also have the compassion and patience to provide the support they need to succeed. As a result, you play a vital role in helping people achieve their weight loss goals.

8. You will treat illnesses by promoting healthy eating habits:

As a Nutrition nurse, you will treat illnesses by promoting healthy eating habits. As a Nutrition nurse, you will be responsible for caring for patients with nutritional needs. You will also be responsible for educating patients and their families on how to maintain a healthy diet to prevent disease.

9. You will manage parenteral nutrition:

As a Nutrition nurse, you are responsible for managing parenteral nutrition. This includes ensuring that patients receive the correct nutrients and calories and can tolerate the therapy. You will also need to monitor for complications and educate patients and their families about the importance of nutrition.

10. You will manage enteral nutrition:

As a Nutrition nurse, you are responsible for the enteral nutrition of patients who are unable to eat by mouth. You will work with dietitians and doctors to create a plan that meets the patient's nutritional needs. You will also be responsible for teaching the patient and their family how to prepare and administer the nutrition.


Where Does A Nutrition Nurse Work?


You will find Nutrition nurses working in various environments. Your skill set as a nutrition nurse can be utilized in many different places. The most common places you will find nutrition nurses working in are:

1. Hospitals:

You will find nutrition nurses working in hospitals. You are an essential part of the healthcare team, providing support and guidance to patients on improving their diet and maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

2. Schools:

Nutrition nurses working in schools are responsible for much more than just teaching kids about healthy eating habits. In addition to providing nutritional information and resources, you will also play an essential role in promoting physical activity and supporting wellness initiatives. You will often collaborate with other school staff members, such as counselors and physical education teachers, to create an environment that promotes healthy choices.

You may also work with Parents and Teacher groups or after-school programs to provide families with nutrition and physical activity information. Nutrition nurses play a vital role in helping students develop lifelong habits of good nutrition and physical activity.

3. Rehabilitation facilities:

Nutrition nurses who work in rehabilitation facilities are responsible for much more than just ensuring patients are getting the right amount of calories. You will also need to ensure that patients get the right mix of nutrients, including vitamins, minerals, and fluids.

In addition, you will monitor patients for any signs of malnutrition or other nutritional problems. You will play an important role in recovering patients who have been through a significant illness or injury. Ensuring that patients receive the proper nutrition can help speed up the healing process and improve the chances of a full recovery.

4. Clinics:

Nutrition nurses who work in clinics are responsible for much more than just passing out pamphlets on the latest fad diet. You will play a vital role in promoting and supporting healthy eating habits among your patients. You will work with individuals and families to develop customized nutrition plans that meet their specific needs and preferences. You will also provide education on the importance of good nutrition and how to make healthy food choices.

In addition, you will often collaborate with other health care professionals to ensure that their patients receive the best possible care.

5. Grocery stores:

Nutrition nurses who work in grocery stores are responsible for helping shoppers make healthy choices. You will offer advice on everything from food labels to portion sizes. You are always happy to help customers find the perfect item. But your most important job is to teach people about nutrition. After all, grocery shopping is a necessary part of life, and knowing how to make healthy choices is essential.

6. Long-term care facility:

Nutrition nurses working in long-term care facilities are responsible for much more than just meal times. You are responsible for ensuring that residents receive the proper nutrition to maintain their health and well-being. This includes creating and implementing individualized care plans, providing education and counseling on nutrition and diet, and coordinating with other healthcare team members.

7. Wellness programs:

Nutrition nurses who work in wellness programs are responsible for helping people to maintain a healthy diet. This can be difficult, as many people are unaware of the importance of eating healthy food. You will need to be able to explain the benefits of a healthy diet in a way that is easy for people to understand. You will also need to be able to provide support and advice to people who are struggling to make changes to their diet.


What Is The Typical Work Schedule Of A Nutrition Nurse?


The typical work schedule for a Nutrition nurse will vary depending on the environment you work in. You may find yourself working Monday through Friday 40 hours a week. You may also find yourself covering weekend hours. You will rarely find yourself working overnight hours. Nutritional needs rarely need to be attended to in the middle of the night.


What Are The Most Important Skills And Abilities Required To Successfully Work As A Nutrition Nurse?


When deciding to become a nutrition nurse, it is important to ensure that you possess certain skills. By possessing certain skills, you will ensure that you will be successful in your role as a nutrition nurse. Below you will find the skills to successfully work as a nutrition nurse:

1. Communication:

One of the most important skills a nutrition nurse needs to have is written and verbal communication skills. After all, how else will you convince your patients to eat their greens? Jokes aside, communicating effectively is essential in any medical profession, but it takes on particular importance in nursing.

Nutrition nurses need to be able to explain complex dietary concepts in simple terms, and they also need to be able to build strong relationships with their patients. This can be challenging, but it is essential in order to help patients make lasting changes to their diet and improve their overall health. So, if you are considering a career in nutrition nursing, brush up on your communication skills – it will come in handy more than you think!

2. Patience:

As a nutrition nurse, you will need to be patient. This is because a lot of the work is put into educating people about making long-term lifestyle changes. And we all know how resistant people can be to change. Getting people to adopt new eating habits is like herding cats. But it is worth it when you see the positive results in people's health.

3. Time-management:

Time management is essential to being a successful nutrition nurse. That is because there are only so many hours in a day, and you need to be able to make the most of them. That means being efficient with tasks like food preparation and patient education. It also means having the ability to multitask and keep track of multiple patients at once. But above all, it means being able to use time wisely. Because when it comes to the business of keeping people healthy, every minute counts.

4. Collaboration:

Collaboration is a key component to the work you will do as a nutrition nurse. You will often work with dietitians, doctors, and other health care professionals to ensure that patients receive the best possible care. This means you need to communicate effectively and work well as part of a team.

5. Organization:

Another one of the important skills a nutrition nurse needs to have is organization. You must be able to keep track of patients' diet plans, monitor their progress, and make changes as required. This can be a lot of information to keep track of, so nutrition nurses must be well-organized.

6. Self-motivation:

Nutrition nurses have a lot on their plate, so to speak. You need to be able to motivate yourself in order to stay on top of their game.

7. Detail-oriented:

If you are thinking about becoming a nutrition nurse, being detail-oriented is essential. This means being able to keep track of all the little details that are involved in a patient's care. For example, you will need to be able to track what they eat and how much they eat, as well as any supplements they are taking.

You will also need to be able to monitor their progress and make sure that they are getting the nutrients they need. In addition, being detail-oriented you will help spot any potential problems early on so that you can quickly address them. So if you are detail-oriented and passionate about helping others, a nutrition nursing career may be perfect for you.

8. Compassion:

Compassion is extremely important to have as a nutrition nurse. After all, it is not easy seeing patients who are struggling with their weight and it can be even harder to see those same patients make changes that do not seem to be working. But nutrition nurses need to be there for their patients, offering support and encouragement even when the going gets tough. And what could be more rewarding than helping someone finally reach their goals? So if you are thinking about becoming a nutrition nurse, remember that compassion will be one of your most important tools.


How Much Does A Nutrition Nurse Make?


One of the most important aspects of deciding on becoming a nutrition nurse is knowing how much does a nutrition nurse make. The average nutrition nurse's salary is $30.79 an hour. This will be a monthly income of $5,340 or an annual salary of $64,044.

An entry-level nutrition salary will be $42,750 a year. This will be a monthly income of $3,560 or an hourly wage of $20.55.

Once you have worked as a nutrition nurse for anywhere from one to four years, your hourly wage will be $23.72 an hour. This is a monthly wage of $4,110 a year or a yearly income of $49,330. If you work anywhere from five to nine years, your hourly wage will increase to $28.99 an hour or $5,030 a month. This means your annual salary will increase to $60,300.

Once you have ten to nineteen years of experience, you will have an annual salary of $74,910 a year. This is an hourly wage of $36.01 or a monthly income of $6,240. Once you have reached twenty or more years of experience as a nutrition nurse, your hourly wage will increase to $44.73 an hour or $7,750 a month. This is an annual income of $93,040.

Level of Experience HourlyMonthlyAnnual
Entry-Level $20.55$3,560$42,750
1-4 Years of Experience $23.72$4,110$49,330
5-9 Years of Experience $28.99$5,030$60,300
10-19 Years of Experience $36.01$6,240$74,910
20 Years or More Experience $44.73$7,750$93,040
Average Salary$30.79$5,340$64,044


Is There A Demand For Nutrition Nurses?


Is there a demand for nutrition nurses? It's a valid question, given the current state of the economy. However, the answer is a resounding yes! Some of the reasons for this demand are:

1. Prevent childhood obesity:

Childhood obesity has become an epidemic in recent years. As a result, there is a growing demand for nutrition nurses. You will help educate parents and children about healthy eating habits and portion control. You will also work with schools to develop nutritious lunch programs and implement physical activity initiatives. In addition, you will play an important role in identifying and treating childhood obesity. By helping to prevent and treat this condition, you are positively impacting our future generation's health.

2. People have many co-morbidities:

Nutrition nurses are in high demand these days, and it is no wonder why. With all the different co-morbidities, it is hard to track what you should and should not be eating. But luckily, you are here to help. You can develop individualized dietary plans to help treat various conditions, including heart disease, diabetes, and obesity. In addition, they can teach patients how to make healthy lifestyle choices that will improve their overall health.

3. Obesity:

Nutrition nurses are in high demand because Americans have a high rate of obesity. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than one-third of American adults are obese. You provide vital care for these patients, helping them achieve and maintain a healthy weight. In addition to providing education and support, you will also play an important role in developing and implementing weight-loss plans. As the prevalence of obesity continues to rise, so does the demand for skilled and compassionate nutrition nurses.


What Is The Step-By-Step Process To Become A Nutrition Nurse?


As a Registered Nurse (RN) with specialized training in nutrition, you will play a vital role in helping patients maintain their health and well-being. Here is a step-by-step guide to becoming a nutrition nurse:

1. Complete an Associate’s degree in Nursing (ADN) or a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) program. This will typically take two to four years of full-time study.

2. Pass the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX) to earn your RN license.

3. Consider completing a Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) focusing on nutrition. This will give you the advanced knowledge and skills needed to provide expert patient care. Keep in mind that this is not mandatory

4. Get experience working as an RN in a hospital or clinical setting.

5. The NBNSC and AACN offer certification examinations in nutritional support. You may pursue a certification to demonstrate credibility with clients and other professionals. To take the NBNSC examination, candidates must first meet certain requirements to be eligible to take the exam. The NBNSC and AANC recommend that candidates hold two years of experience in nutrition support before receiving certification. Certification is in Nutrition Coach, Certified Clinical Nutritionist (CCN) certification, or certified nutrition support



TOP CONS OF BEING A NUTRITION NURSE


(The following are the top 10 disadvantages of being a Nutrition Nurse.)

1. Your job can be monotonous.

As a nutrition nurse, your job can be monotonous. One of the cons of being a nutrition nurse is that you might find yourself dispensing the same advice daily: eat your fruits and vegetables, drink plenty of water, avoid sugary drinks, and get some exercise. It can be easy to fall into a routine and to just go through the motions. Then you will stop seeing the value in your actions.

2. It may be hard to get patients to comply with your plans.

As a nutrition nurse, you are responsible for helping patients make healthy changes to their diet and lifestyle. However, getting patients to comply with your recommendations can be challenging. Many people find it hard to change their eating habits, even when they are motivated to do so. And even when they can make changes, they may not be able to stick with them long-term. As a result, you may feel like you are constantly struggling to get patients to comply with your plans.

3. Your job can be emotionally draining.

One of the top cons of being a nutrition nurse, is you may find your job emotionally draining. You see patients struggling with their weight, and you know that you can help them improve their health. However, you also see very sick patients, and you know that there is only so much that you can do. You may feel helpless as you watch patients suffer, and you may find yourself wondering what more you could have done. This can be emotionally exhausting.

4. You will have to work with many different personalities.

You will have to work with many different personalities as a nutrition nurse. Some patients will be easy to work with, and others will be more challenging. You may have to deal with angry, sad, or scared patients. You may also work with patients who are reluctant to change their diet or have unrealistic expectations. So, if you cannot adapt to all these personalities, this may not be the job for you.

5. You will need an additional certificate if you want to stand out.

Another one of the disadvantages of being a nutrition nurse is you will need a certification if you want to stand out. Although credentials will distinguish you from other job applicants, becoming certified can be time-consuming and expensive. So, if you feel like adding more stress to your already complete to-do list, I guess you can venture down this path.

6. You may feel undervalued.

As a nutrition nurse, you may feel undervalued. Your job is important, but it can be difficult to see the fruits of your labor. You often work long hours for little pay compared to other nursing specialties, and your patients can be uncooperative. It is easy to feel like your efforts are going unnoticed.

7. You may be exposed to pathogens.

One of the cons of being a nutrition nurse is you may be exposed to pathogens daily. These pathogens can come from food, water, or even the air. While most of these pathogens are harmless, others are not. As a result, you may be at a higher risk of becoming ill.

8. You will not earn as much as other nursing specialties.

You will not earn as much as a nutrition nurse as other nursing specialties. In fact, you may make less than half as much as some of your colleagues. Nutrition nurses work hard to help their patients improve their health. Still, they are not rewarded with the same financial compensation. Suppose you are considering a career in nursing. In that case, you should be aware that nutrition nursing is not as lucrative as other nursing specialties.

9. You will have to deal with a lot of fad diets.

As a nutrition nurse, you will inevitably come across patients following some kind of fad diet. Whether it is the latest celebrity-endorsed cleanse or a long-standing diet craze, these fad diets can often do more harm than good.

While some fad diets may help people lose weight in the short term, they are often difficult to maintain in the long term and can lead to nutritional deficiencies. In addition, many fad diets promote unhealthy eating habits, such as eliminating entire food groups or severely restricting calorie intake. As a nutrition nurse, you may find it difficult to steer your clients away from these fad diets and have them listen to your expertise.

10. If you do not have a Bachelor's degree, you may find gaining employment difficult.

Another one of the biggest disadvantages of being a nutrition nurse is that you may find it challenging to get a job without a bachelor's degree in nursing. Institutions want a BSN nurse due to the work's highly technical and specialized nature. If you do not have a BSN you may find yourself competing against nurses with more experience and education for jobs.

In some cases, you may be able to get a job with an associate's degree. Still, you may not be able to advance in your career without a bachelor's degree. As a result, it is crucial to consider your long-term career goals before deciding whether or not to pursue this profession.


TOP PROS OF BEING A NUTRITION NURSE


(The following are the top 10 advantages of being a Nutrition Nurse.)

1. You get to help people improve their overall health and well-being.

One of the biggest pros of being a nutrition nurse is you help people improve their overall health and well-being. You work with patients to develop healthy eating habits and lifestyles and provide support and guidance throughout their journey to better health.

In addition to working with individuals, you also have the opportunity to educate groups on the importance of good nutrition and healthy living. It is a rewarding career that makes a real difference in the lives of others. And, at the end of the day, you can go home knowing that you have helped make the world a little bit healthier.

2. You can specialize in working with specific populations

As a nutrition nurse, you can specialize in working with particular populations. You can work with pregnant women to ensure they are getting the nutrients they need, or you can work with children to ensure they get the proper amount of vitamins and minerals. You can also work with the elderly, who often need help getting the nutrients they need to stay healthy.

3. You have the opportunity to work in a variety of settings

Another one of the top pros of being a nutrition nurse is you have the opportunity to work in a variety of settings. You could work in a hospital, clinic, or even a school. This means that if one setting does not feel like a good fit for you, there are others to choose from.

4. You can choose to work full-time or part-time.

As a nutrition nurse, you can work full-time or part-time. If you choose to work full-time, you will be expected to work 40 hours per week. However, if you choose to work part-time, you will only be expected to work 20 hours per week. This flexibility allows you to tailor your schedule to your needs. It will enable you to pursue other interests outside of work.

5. There are many opportunities for career advancement.

Another one of the pros of being a nutrition nurse is you will have many opportunities for career advancement. You can become an advanced practice nurse or work on the managerial side. No matter the path you choose, one thing is sure, you will not be working a dead-end job.

6. Your work is rewarding.

As a nutrition nurse, your work is rewarding. You get to counsel people on healthy eating habits, recommend nutrient-rich foods, and help people make lifestyle changes that improve their overall health. In addition, you get to see the positive impact of your work firsthand when patients experience improved health and quality of life. It is no wonder many nurses find their calling in nutrition nursing!

7. You will have a better schedule than other nursing disciplines

Another one of the notable advantages of being a nutrition nurse is you will have a better schedule as a nutrition nurse than in other nursing disciplines. You will be able to work fewer hours and have more time off. As a result, you will have a more flexible schedule and be able to choose when and where you work.

As a nutrition nurse, you will have a more rewarding and flexible career than in other nursing disciplines.

8. Your job is not physical.

As a nutrition nurse, your job will not be physical. You will not get injured from lifting heavy patients or working long hours on your feet. Instead, you will be responsible for providing information and resources to patients about nutrition and healthy eating habits. While your job will not be physically demanding, it will be important and rewarding. Helping people to improve their health and well-being is a truly gratifying experience.

9. You are incredibly versatile.

As a nutrition nurse, you are highly versatile. Not only are you a nutrition expert, but you also are a nurse. You can wear many hats with your skill set and knowledge.

10. You can travel.

One of the biggest advantages of being a nutrition nurse you can take up a travel contract. Taking up a travel contract will enable you to work, travel, and live life to the fullest. You will have the best of both worlds.



BREAKING DOWN THE SALARY OF A NUTRITION NURSE


What Is The Starting Salary Of A Nutrition Nurse?


The starting salary of a nutrition nurse is $42,750 a year. You can expect a monthly salary of $3,560 or $822 a week. You will be earning an hourly rate of $20.55.

Hourly$20.55
Weekly $822
Monthly$3,560
Annual$42,750


What Is The Average Salary Of A Nutrition Nurse?


The average nutrition nurse's salary is $30.79 an hour or $1,232 a week. This means you will earn $5,340 a month or an annual salary of $64,044.

Hourly$30.79
Weekly $1,232
Monthly$5,340
Annual$64,044
(Source: Ziprecruiter.com)


What Is The Average Nutrition Nurse Salary In Your State?


When deciding if you want to become a nutrition nurse, you must know how much your average annual salary will be based on where you live. Even though you are performing the same job in the same state, your average yearly salary will differ; for example, in Alabama, you will earn an annual income of $48,210 or an hourly rate of $23.18. Now, in New Jersey, you will be earning around $20,000 more. In New Jersey, your annual income would be $68,610 or $32.99 an hour.

State Hourly Monthly Annual
Alabama $23.18 $4,020 $48,210
Alaska $36.66 $6,360 $76,260
Arizona $30.93 $5,360 $64,340
Arkansas $24.49 $4,250 $50,940
California $46.39 $8,040 $96,500
Colorado $29.96 $5,190 $62,320
Connecticut $32.65 $5,660 $67,920
Delaware $28.61 $4,960 $59,500
Florida $26.75 $4,640 $55,640
Georgia $27.52 $4,770 $57,240
Hawaii $40.34 $6,990 $83,910
Idaho $27.57 $4,780 $57,340
Illinois $28.69 $4,970 $59,680
Indiana $25.97 $4,500 $54,020
Iowa $24.08 $4,170 $50,080
Kansas $24.71 $4,280 $51,390
Kentucky $24.91 $4,320 $51,810
Louisiana $26.17 $4,540 $54,440
Maine $27.34 $4,740 $56,860
Maryland $31.40 $5,440 $65,310
Massachusetts $37.04 $6,420 $77,040
Michigan $28.47 $4,940 $59,220
Minnesota $31.15 $5,400 $64,800
Mississippi $23.57 $4,090 $49,030
Missouri $25.36 $4,400 $52,750
Montana $27.14 $4,710 $56,460
Nebraska $26.74 $4,640 $55,620
Nevada $34.54 $5,990 $71,840
New Hampshire $29.24 $5,070 $60,810
New Jersey $32.99 $5,720 $68,610
New Mexico $29.13 $5,050 $60,590
New York $34.54 $5,990 $71,850
North Carolina $26.53 $4,600 $55,190
North Dakota $26.80 $4,650 $55,740
Ohio $26.84 $4,650 $55,830
Oklahoma $25.63 $4,440 $53,310
Oregon $37.03 $6,420 $77,030
Pennsylvania $28.54 $4,950 $59,370
Rhode Island $31.86 $5,520 $66,270
South Carolina $25.84 $4,480 $53,740
South Dakota $23.46 $4,070 $48,800
Tennessee $24.67 $4,280 $51,320
Texas $29.55 $5,120 $61,470
Utah $27.08 $4,690 $56,330
Vermont $27.76 $4,810 $57,740
Virginia $28.63 $4,960 $59,540
Washington $35.14 $6,090 $73,090
West Virginia $25.06 $4,340 $52,130
Wisconsin $28.77 $4,990 $59,840
Wyoming $27.94 $4,840 $58,110



HIGHEST PAID NUTRITION NURSES IN THE NATION


What Are The 10 Highest Paying States For Nutrition Nurses?


So, I am sure that now that you know that each state has a different pay rate for nutrition nurses, I am sure you are curious as to which states are the highest paying states for nutrition nurses. California is the highest paying state for nutrition nurses. Here you will earn an average annual salary of $96,500. Hawaii is not far behind, with you earning an annual average wage of $83,910. Massachusetts, Oregon, Alaska, Washington, New York, and Nevada will all have you earning an average yearly salary in the $70,000 range. New Jersey and Connecticut will have you earning a salary in the high $60,000 range.

Rank State Average
Annual Salary
1 California $96,500
2 Hawaii $83,910
3 Massachusetts $77,040
4 Oregon $77,030
5 Alaska $76,260
6 Washington $73,090
7 New York $71,850
8 Nevada $71,840
9 New Jersey $68,610
10 Connecticut $67,920


What Are The 10 Highest Paying Metros For Nutrition Nurses?


The highest paying metros for nutrition nurses are all in California. The highest paying metro in California for nutrition nurses is San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, CA. In this metro, you will be earning $119,430 a year. Redding, CA, is the lowest paying metro out of the top 10 highest paying metros. In this metro of California, you will be earning $89,540 a year.

Rank Metro Average
Annual Salary
1 San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, CA $119,430
2 San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA $117,560
3 Vallejo-Fairfield, CA $113,780
4 Sacramento--Roseville--Arden-Arcade, CA $107,540
5 Salinas, CA $105,790
6 Santa Rosa, CA $99,930
7 Modesto, CA $96,930
8 Stockton-Lodi, CA $92,740
9 Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, CA $90,550
10 Redding, CA $89,540



Top Organizations And Associations For Nutrition Nurses


American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition: ASPEN is dedicated to improving patient care by advancing the science and practice of clinical nutrition. Founded in 1976, ASPEN has grown from a small group committed exclusively to parenteral or enteral nourishment treatments into an organization with more than 6 thousand members involved across all disciplines related to medicine. Aspen's dedication does not end there; they also provide continuing education courses for those working within this field so that professionals can stay up on their latest research advancements.

American Nutrition Association: The American Nurses Association is a one-stop-shop for nurses looking to advance their careers. The site offers articles on all topics related to certification, education opportunities, and even some job listings!


My Final Thoughts


So there you have it, the top 10 pros and cons of being a nutrition nurse + salary + steps to become one. Nutrition nurses have a unique opportunity to help people improve their health and well-being. With the right skills, knowledge, and attitude, you can make a real difference in your patients' lives. On the other hand, some challenges come with the job. It takes hard work and dedication to be successful in this career field. So, what do you think of the pros and cons of being a nutrition nurse? Are the pros worth the cons?


FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ANSWERED BY OUR EXPERT


1. Is Nutrition Nursing A Good Career?

Yes, a career as a nutrition nurse is a good career. It is a respectable career that allows you to positively impact people's lives.


2. On Average, How Much Does A Nutrition Nurse Make Per Hour?

The average nutrition nurse's salary per hour is $30.79

$34.15


3. How Many Hours A Week Does A Nutrition Nurse Work?

The number of hours you will work a week as a nutrition nurse will depend on your job type. If you work part-time, you will work around 20 hours a week. If you work full-time, you will work approximately 40 hours a week. The setting you work in will also affect the number of hours you will work.


4. Is Being A Nutrition Nurse Stressful?

Being a nutrition nurse will have its moments of stress. The difference is that your stress will stem from sources other than a nurse who works at the bedside. You may become stressed and overwhelmed with juggling tasks. You will not be placed in emergency situations like other nursing professions.


5. Do I Need To Be Certified To Work As A Nutrition Nurse?

Certification is not required to be a Nutrition nurse, but it will only benefit you.


6. What Certifications Are Required Or Recommended For A Nutrition Nurse?

The NBNSC and AACN offer certification examinations in nutritional support. You may pursue a certification to demonstrate credibility with clients and other professionals. To take the NBNSC examination, candidates must first meet certain requirements to be eligible to take the exam. The NBNSC and AANC recommend that candidates hold two years of experience in nutrition support before receiving certification. Certification is in Nutrition Coach, Certified Clinical Nutritionist (CCN) certification, or certified nutrition support.


7. How Long Does It Take To Become A Nutrition Nurse?

It will take two to four years to complete your associate's degree or Bachelor's degree in nursing and an additional year to complete the course work needed to become certified.


8. How Much Does It Cost To Become A Nutrition Nurse?

An associate's degree in nursing costs anywhere from $6,000 to $150,000. A Bachelor’s degree in Nursing will cost anywhere from $20,000 to $200,000. If you choose to pursue certification, this will add anywhere from $400 to $4,000, depending on which certificate you choose.


9. What Kind Of Career Advancement Opportunities Are There For Nutrition Nurses?

As a nutrition nurse, you have the opportunity to advance your career in several different ways. You can become an advanced practice nurse, a manager, or even run your own nutritional clinic. You can find the right path for your career goals with so many options available.

Becoming an advanced practice nurse allows you to provide more comprehensive care to your patients. You will be able to prescribe medication, order diagnostic tests, and provide education and counseling on nutrition and healthy lifestyle choices. This higher level of care can significantly impact your patients' health and well-being.

If you are interested in management, you can use your skills to oversee the work of other nutrition nurses. In this role, you will be responsible for the department's scheduling, staffing, and budgeting. You will also be involved in developing policies and procedures. This is a great way to use your organizational skills to improve patient care.

Finally, if you are entrepreneurial and looking for a challenge, you could start your own nutritional clinic. This would allow you to set your own hours, choose your own staff, and design your own programs. This is a great way to use your knowledge and expertise to help people achieve


10. What Are The 5 Most Common Nutrition Nurse Interview Questions?

1. What made you decide on a career in nutrition?
2. What aspects of nutrition are most important to address when consulting with clients?
3. Give an example of how you would handle a difficult client
4. Can you give an example of an individualized nutrition plan you have developed for a client?
5. How do you collaborate with other healthcare providers?



11. What Is The Most Important Role Of A Nutrition Nurse?


The most crucial role of a nutrition nurse is to educate patients about healthy eating habits and help them make changes to their diets.


12. What Is The Quickest Way To Become A Nutrition Nurse?

The quickest way to become a Nutrition Nurse is to earn an Associate's degree in nursing before making your certification. Earning an Associate's degree will shave two years off of the time it would take to complete a Bachelor's degree in nursing.


13. How Hard Is It To Become A Nutrition Nurse?

For some people, becoming a nutrition nurse will be difficult. Others will find earning this degree easy. It all depends on the person.


14. Can I Start My Own Business As A Nutrition Nurse?

If you are a qualified nurse with a passion for nutrition, you may be wondering if you can start your own business as a nutrition nurse. The short answer is yes! There are many opportunities for nurses with nutritional expertise to create their own businesses, whether consulting with clients, developing educational materials, or working as part of a team in a wellness center.

Of course, as with any business, there are some things you will need to consider before taking the plunge. But if you have the drive and the dedication, starting your own business as a nutrition nurse can be a very rewarding experience.


15. Do Nutrition Nurses Get Paid Well?

Nutrition nurses do get paid well. The only thing is that nutrition nurses do not earn as much as other types of nurses.


16. Can A Nutritionist Become A Nutrition Nurse?

If a Nutritionist wanted to become a nutrition nurse, they would need to earn a nursing degree. This means you would have to make either an Associate's degree in Nursing or a Bachelor's degree in nursing.


Jennifer Schlette MSN, RN
Jennifer Schlette is a registered nurse in pediatric critical care in New York City. She is the former Director of Undergraduate Nursing at a college located in New York. After obtaining her BSN from the College of Mount Saint Vincent, she went on to complete her MSN.