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10 Pros and Cons of Being a Clinical Nurse Educator + Salary + Steps to Become


Written By: Jennifer Schlette MSN, RN

If you are reading this article, there is a good chance you are considering a career as a clinical nurse educator. And why not? It is an incredibly rewarding field that allows you to help nurses and nursing students develop their skills and make a real difference in people's lives. But before making the leap, it is essential to know what are the pros and cons of being a clinical nurse educator? This article will explore the top 10 pros and cons of being a clinical nurse educator + salary + steps to become one. So, buckle up, and let's dive into it.


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What Exactly Is A Clinical Nurse Educator?


A clinical nurse educator is a registered nurse who has advanced training, knowledge, and experience in nursing education. These nurses have obtained an advanced degree. Many have a Master’s of Science in Nursing, and some have a terminal degree such as a Doctorate. The role of the clinical nurse educator is to prepare future nurses for the rigors of nursing practice.


What Does A Clinical Nurse Educator Do?


So, what does a clinical nurse educator do? As a clinical nurse educator, you will find that you will have various duties that will fall under your scope. Below you will find the 8 most common duties of a clinical nurse educator:

1. Design and deliver nursing education programs:

These programs prepare nurses for the challenges they face in their careers. Clinical nurse educators use their clinical expertise and knowledge of educational theory to prepare nurses for the real world. They design programs that offer both classroom and hands-on learning experiences.

2. Keep current nurses up to date:

The clinical nurse educator works with current nurses to help them update their skills and knowledge. The role of a clinical nurse educator is essential, as nurses are responsible for patient care. The clinical nurse educator ensures that nurses are able to provide safe and effective patient care.

3. Delivering continuing education programs:

The clinical nurse educator is often also responsible for continuing education programs for nurses. These programs can take many different forms, but they usually involve some sort of class or workshop. These programs are often required for nurses to maintain their license or certification.

4. Developing curricula:

As a clinical nurse educator, you will be responsible for developing curricula for nursing students. This will include planning, creating, and implementing coursework and teaching materials. You will also be required to assess student learning and evaluate the effectiveness of your curriculum. In addition, you will need to keep abreast of new developments in nursing education and be able to incorporate these into your teaching.

5. Conducting research:

One of your duties as a clinical nurse educator is to conduct research. This research is used to improve patient care and help find new ways to treat diseases. You may work with a team of nurses and doctors to conduct clinical trials or be responsible for conducting your own research projects.

6. Writing articles and textbooks:

Clinical nurse educators write articles and textbooks. The manuscripts you will write will serve as your student's primary means of communication. It is important to remember that your audience is composed of future nurses who will be using your information to care for patients.

7. Ensure that your knowledge is up to date:

Attending conferences, seminars, and continuing education is essential to ensure that all your healthcare knowledge is current. However, it is not just about going to these events. It is also necessary to be an active participant and take the time to network with other professionals.

8. Training individual nurses to work in specialist areas:

Clinical nurse educators train individual nurses to work in specialist areas. These may be new nurses or nurses who have transferred from another unit. You as the educator will assess the learner's knowledge and skills and then provides them with the information and tools they need to succeed in their new roles.


Where Does A Clinical Nurse Educator Work?


When deciding if you want to become a clinical nurse educator, you will first need to ask yourself where you see yourself working. This is important because the job of a clinical nurse educator can be very different depending on the setting.

1. Hospitals:

One of the settings you may find yourself working in as a clinical nurse educator is a hospital. This type of work environment can be both rewarding and challenging. You will be working with various medical staff, patients, and their families. Here you will be responsible for training new nurses and ensuring already established staff members are up-to-date on the latest nursing techniques and procedures.

2. Long-term care facilities:

You will find clinical nurse educators working in long-term care facilities. In this type of setting, you will typically provide education to the staff. It is not unusual for the clinical nurse educator to be involved in policy development and quality improvement initiatives as well. The focus of the clinical nurse educator in long-term care is to ensure that residents receive high-quality, person-centered care.

3. Rehabilitation centers:

In the rehabilitation setting, your role as the clinical nurse educator is to provide nursing care and education to patients with physical or mental disabilities. The goal of rehabilitation is to help patients regain as much function as possible to lead fulfilling lives. Clinical nurse educators play an essential role in assisting patients to reach their rehabilitation goals. You will use your clinical knowledge and expertise to develop individualized care plans for each patient. In addition, you will provide education to patients and families about their condition and how to best manage it.

4. Educational institutions:

One popular setting for clinical nurse educators to work in is an educational facility. You will typically work in nursing and vocational schools. You will generally teach classes and provide guidance to students enrolled in nursing programs in these settings. Additionally, you may also be responsible for developing the curriculum, designing and conducting research studies, and providing consultation services to nursing school faculty members.

5. Medical equipment companies:

You can find clinical nurse educators working for medical equipment companies. In this type of setting, you will be responsible for teaching and training nurses on how to use the equipment. You may also be asked to provide support to the nurses in their clinical practice. This can be a gratifying career, as you will be helping nurses to improve patient care.

6. NCLEX review courses:

You will also find clinical nurse educators working for NCLEX review companies. These educators help nursing students prepare for the NCLEX exam. They develop and create content for the company's review course. Additionally, they may also teach classes or present webinars on test-taking strategies.

7. Drug companies:

Drug companies will also employ the expertise of clinical nurse educators. Your job is to work with patients and families to ensure they understand their medications, how to take them properly, and what to expect from treatment. As a clinical nurse educator, you may also support nurses who are new to a medication or therapy area.


What Is The Typical Work Schedule Of A Clinical Nurse Educator?


The schedule of a clinical nurse educator will vary depending on the setting you are working in. If you work in a hospital-based or long-term care setting, you will work varying hours. These varying hours are due to the fact that you will have to ensure that both the day shift and night shift nurses have met their educational requirements.

Suppose you choose to work in another setting such as a medical device company or a drug company, in that case, you can have a varying schedule such as a combination of all different hours or a regular schedule such as Monday through Friday eight to five.

If you choose to work in an academic setting, such as a nursing program or review course, you may have a regular schedule, or you may be able to work remotely at your own pace. You will have a good amount of autonomy over your schedule.


What Are The Most Important Skills And Abilities Required To Successfully Work As A Clinical Nurse Educator?


When you decide to become a clinical nurse educator, it is essential to ensure that you possess the skills and abilities to successfully perform the job. The most critical skills and abilities required to work as a clinical nurse educator include:

1. Excellent communication and interpersonal skills:

As a clinical nurse educator, you will be working with a variety of different people, including patients, their families, and other healthcare professionals. It is essential that you have excellent communication and interpersonal skills in order to effectively communicate with all of these different groups of people.

2. Strong organizational skills:

As a clinical nurse educator, you will be responsible for creating and implementing educational plans and programs. This requires excellent organizational skills to ensure that all the necessary components are included in the plan and executed effectively.

3. Mentoring:

Mentoring is one of the most important skills and abilities required to successfully work as a clinical nurse educator. As a clinical nurse educator, you will be working with new nurses who are just starting their careers. You will be responsible for teaching them the basics of nursing care and helping them to develop the skills they need to be successful in their careers.

4. Leadership:

The ability to lead is one of the most important skills and abilities required to successfully work as a clinical nurse educator. As a clinical nurse educator, you will often be required to take on a leadership role to effectively manage and oversee the educational needs of your students and nurses. In order to be an effective leader, you must possess a strong sense of self-confidence and be able to effectively communicate with others. You must also be able to inspire and motivate those around you in order to create a positive learning environment.

5. Self-motivation:

As a clinical nurse educator, possessing self-motivation is one of the most essential skills and abilities you can have. After all, it is you who will be responsible for teaching future nurses! Self-motivation will not only ensure that you are always on the lookout for new and innovative ways to teach your students, but it will also keep you inspired in your work.

6. Critical thinking:

Being a critical thinker is a skill that is essential for anyone in the field of nursing education. It is a process of reflecting on one's own thoughts and actions and those of others to make reasoned judgments. Clinical nurse educators must be able to apply critical thinking skills in their work to promote student learning and patient care.

7. Time management:

Managing time is one of the most important skills a clinical nurse educator can have. This is because a clinical nurse educator often has to juggle multiple tasks and responsibilities at any given time. For instance, a typical day for a clinical nurse educator might involve teaching a class, conducting research, meeting with patients, and attending meetings. Conclusion: There are many different balls to keep in the air, so time management skills are essential.

8. Teamwork:

Teamwork is an essential skill that clinical nurse educators need to succeed in their roles. Clinical nurse educators work with a variety of health care professionals. They must be able to effectively communicate and collaborate with others. They also need to understand the perspectives of other team members and reach a consensus on patient care plans.


How Much Does A Clinical Nurse Educator Make?


For many people who are considering if they want to become a clinical nurse educator, salary will play a huge role. So, how much does a clinical nurse educator make? The average clinical nurse educator's salary is $45.01 an hour. This will work out to be $7,800 a month or $93,629 annually.

The level of experience you have as a clinical nurse educator will play into the amount you will earn. At the entry-level of experience, you will be earning $62,500 a year. This will break down to $5,210 a month or $30.05 an hour. When you have gained a bit more experience from one to four years, you can expect your hourly rate to increase to $34.67 or a monthly earning of $6,010. This is an annual salary of $72,120.

Clinical nurse educators who have been in the field for anywhere from five to nine years can expect a monthly salary of $7,350. This monthly salary means that you will be earning $42.30 an hour or $88,150 a year. Those with ten to nineteen years’ experience will earn an annual salary of $109,520 or $9,130 a month. This means your hourly rate will be $52.65.

Clinical nurse educators with twenty y or more years of experience can expect an hourly rate of $65.39 or $11,330 a month. This will translate to an annual salary of $136,010.

Level of Experience HourlyMonthlyAnnual
Entry-Level $30.05$5,210$62,500
1-4 Years of Experience $34.67$6,010$72,120
5-9 Years of Experience $42.38$7,350$88,150
10-19 Years of Experience $52.65$9,130$109,520
20 Years or More Experience $65.39$11,330$136,010
Average Salary$45.01$7,800$93,629


Is There A Demand For Clinical Nurse Educators?


Yes, there is a demand for clinical nurse educators. As the healthcare industry continues to evolve, the need for qualified clinical nurse educators will increase. These professionals play a critical role in ensuring that nurses are appropriately educated and trained. Some of the reasons for this demand are:

1. Retirement:

As baby boomers begin to retire, the demand for nurse educators is likely to increase. This is due to the fact that there will be a need for more nurses to fill the roles that these retirees are leaving behind. So, if you were interested in becoming a clinical nurse educator, well, now may be the time to do it.

2. Aging population:

The average age of current faculty continues to climb, which will lead to the demand for clinical nurse educators. In fact, the average age of current faculty is now over 55 years old! This means that these current educators do not have many productive years of teaching left.

3. No replacements:

In 2019, it was found that 8500 qualified nursing applicants were turned away from Master's programs, and 3157 went unaccepted for doctoral study. The primary reasons cited by AACN include a shortage of faculty to teach students as well as shortage of sites with adequate clinical hours so they can gain hands-on experience.


What Is The Step-By-Step Process To Become A Clinical Nurse Educator?


1. The first step toward becoming a clinical nurse educator is earning your Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree (BSN) from an accredited institution. Earning this degree will provide you with the foundational knowledge as well as prepare you for your role as a nurse.

2. Next, you will need to pass the National Certification Licensure Exam (NCLEX-RN).

3. Once you have passed the NCLEX-RN, you can then apply for a license through the state board of nursing of the state you plan to practice in.

4. You must then earn your Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) degree in order to become a clinical nurse educator. It is best to specialize in the education track.

5. You may also want to further your education by earning your Doctor of Nursing Philosophy (Ph.D.) with a concentration in education or your Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP) with a focus in education.

6. You then may want to consider becoming certified. If you are interested in obtaining your certification, you will then pursue the Certified Nurse Educator (CNE) certification.



TOP CONS OF BEING A CLINICAL NURSE EDUCATOR


(The following are the top 10 disadvantages of being a Clinical Nurse Educator.)

1. Working in academia will not make you rich.

One of the disadvantages of being a clinical nurse educator who works in academia is that you will not make a ton of money. In fact, you will likely make less money than you would if you were working as a staff nurse or in another nursing position. This is because clinical nurse educators are often paid less than other nurses in academia.

2. You will have to ensure the night shift is covered.

As a clinical nurse educator who works in a healthcare facility, you must ensure that the night shift nurses receive their education. This means leaving late or coming in really early! This can leave you feeling exhausted. Depending on where you work, you may run into safety issues coming and going at these hours. You do not want to end up a patient yourself.

3. You will not get paid for all your prep time.

One of the cons of being a clinical nurse educator is that you will not get paid for your prep time. You still have to work extra hours to prepare for class and presentations. This can be a bit of a downer, especially if you are working full-time and have other obligations outside of work.

4. You may have students working under your license.

Another one of the cons of being a clinical nurse educator is that you are responsible for your students while they are in clinical. If they make a mistake, it is technically under your nursing license. This can be a lot of pressure for some people who are not used to having that level of responsibility.

5. You will need to earn a Master's degree.

As a clinical nurse educator, the minimum degree you need to earn is a Master's degree. Earning this degree can be time-consuming and costly. Maybe now would not be the time to mention that many clinical nurse educators also receive their Doctorate degrees to stay competitive.

6. You may bite off more than you can chew

One of the top cons of being a clinical nurse educator is that you may have to take on extra work because of the shortage of clinical nurse educators. It can be a lot of pressure and add stress to your plate. Keep in mind you may not even receive extra compensation for all this work you are taking on. So, if you are considering becoming a clinical nurse educator, be prepared to put in some extra hours!

7. You may have problems with students/nurses.

As a clinical nurse educator, there may be times when issues arise with students and nurses that you are working with. These issues can cause strain on your work life. You may feel like you constantly have to put out fires and that your work is never done.

8. You may have to cover more than one unit.

One of the biggest disadvantages of being a clinical nurse educator is that you may have to cover multiple units in the hospital. This can be very frustrating because it means that you are constantly moving around and never really get to know any of the staff or patients on a personal level. Additionally, it can be challenging to keep up with each unit's different protocols and procedures.

9. You will not have job security unless you have a doctorate degree.

As a clinical nurse educator who works in academia, you will not get tenure without a doctorate degree. Even if you are the best teacher in the world, if you do not have that terminal degree, you will not be able to get tenure. Tenure will give you a little bit more of that safety net. Keep in mind that the doctorate degree is not free. It will cost you money and time.

10. You may find it hard to disconnect.

As a clinical nurse educator, you can find it hard to disconnect from your work. You're always thinking about email, patients, students, nurses, and deadlines. Answering emails during your time off can consume you. You do not have time for friends or family. Your relationships will suffer.



TOP PROS OF BEING A CLINICAL NURSE EDUCATOR


(The following are the top 10 advantages of being a Clinical Nurse Educator.)

1. If you work in academia, you could have some pretty good time off.

One of the pros of being a clinical nurse educator is that you could have some great time off if you work in academia. For example, you might get summers off and winter and spring break. Of course, this all depends on your school and program, but it is definitely something to look into!

2. You may never have to work nights and weekends.

One of the biggest advantages of being a clinical nurse educator is that you may not have to work nights or weekends. This is a big perk, especially if you have young children at home. You will also have more control over your schedule and can often choose your own hours. Of course, this varies depending on the facility you work at. Still, overall, clinical nurse educators have much more flexible schedules than other types of nurses.

3. If you work in a healthcare facility, you will make a great living.

As a clinical nurse educator who works in a healthcare facility, you will make a great living. The type of money you will be earning will afford you a comfortable lifestyle and security. You will be able to afford some of the finer things in life. In addition to your regular salary, you will also receive benefits such as health insurance and a retirement plan.

4. You will not have a physically demanding job.

Another one of the pros of being a clinical nurse educator is that the job is not physically demanding. So, if you are not in the best shape, do not worry. This job will not require you to be.

You will not have to worry about becoming injured at work from moving a patient the wrong way. An injury can not only be painful, but it can also hurt you financially. Being a clinical nurse educator is a great way to help others and further your career without having to worry about putting your body through too much stress.

5. You will be in demand.

As a clinical nurse educator, you will be in demand. Embarking on a career that is in such high demand means that you will always be able to find a job. It will give a great deal of security. Having job security will provide you with a sense of stability and an increased feeling of self-worth.

6. Lower stress

As a clinical nurse educator, you will have one of the lower-stress jobs in nursing. Your every day will not be filled with life and death decisions. Instead, you will get to spend your days teaching the next generation of nurses everything they need to know to be successful in their careers. And, at the end of the day, you can go home knowing that you have made a difference in the lives of others. So, if you are looking for a more low-key nursing job, then a career as a clinical nurse educator might be the perfect fit for you.

7. You will rarely get home late.

As a clinical nurse educator, you will rarely get home late from work. Your schedule will be highly predictable, with very few surprises. This makes it easy to plan your life around work. It also means that you will have plenty of time to pursue your other interests outside of work. Whether you enjoy spending time with family, exploring new hobbies, or simply relaxing at home, you will always have time for the things you love.

8. You can choose from a variety of settings to work in

Another one of the top pros of being a clinical nurse educator is that you can select the location you want to work in. You are not tied down to one particular unit or hospital. You can move around to different facilities if you wish. This can be great for nurses who get burned out quickly or who are looking for a change of scenery.

You will also have the option to work in academia if you so choose. Teaching future nurses at a college or university is a noble endeavor and one that comes with its own set of challenges and rewards. Let's also not forget about a job that could await you in the medical equipment field or maybe an appointment with a drug company.

9. You may qualify for loan forgiveness.

As a clinical nurse educator, you may be eligible for loan forgiveness, depending on your state. So, if you have been struggling to make those student loan payments, there may be some relief in sight.

There are a few different ways that you can qualify for loan forgiveness as a clinical nurse educator. One way is through the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program. This program is available to anyone who works full-time for a government or non-profit organization. So, suppose you are a clinical nurse educator working for a hospital or a school. In that case, you may be eligible for this program.

Another way to have your loans forgiven is through the Nurse Faculty Loan Repayment Program. This program is available to nurses who teach at an accredited nursing school. So, if you are a clinical nurse educator in academia, you may be eligible for this program.

10. You are shaping the future of nursing.

Another advantage of being a clinical nurse educator is that you can have a considerable impact on the lives of your students. You will be able to teach them the importance of providing quality patient care and instill in them nursing values. In addition, you will be able to help shape the future of nursing by preparing your students for the challenges they will face in their careers.



BREAKING DOWN THE SALARY OF A CLINICAL NURSE EDUCATOR


What Is The Starting Salary Of A Clinical Nurse Educator?


The starting salary of a clinical nurse educator is $62,500 annually. This figure will equate to $5,210 a month or $1,202 a week. This will be an hourly wage of $30.05.

Hourly$30.05
Weekly $1,202
Monthly$5,210
Annual$62,500


What Is The Average Salary Of A Clinical Nurse Educator?


The average clinical nurse educator's salary is $93,629 a year or a monthly income of $7,800. This means that you will be earning a weekly wage of $1,801 or an hourly rate of $45.01.

Hourly$45.01
Weekly $1,801
Monthly$7,800
Annual$93,629
(Source: Ziprecruier.com)


What Is The Average Clinical Nurse Educator Salary In Your State?


The salary for a clinical nurse educator will not just differ from your years of experience. It will also differ in regards to the state you practice in. For example, in Alabama, you will earn an annual salary of $70,480. In California, you will be earning $141,080 as a clinical nurse educator. You will be making almost double the wages in California that you would make in Alabama for the exact same job.

State Hourly Monthly Annual
Alabama $33.88 $5,870 $70,480
Alaska $53.60 $9,290 $111,490
Arizona $45.22 $7,840 $94,060
Arkansas $35.80 $6,210 $74,470
California $67.83 $11,760 $141,080
Colorado $43.80 $7,590 $91,110
Connecticut $47.74 $8,270 $99,290
Delaware $41.82 $7,250 $86,980
Florida $39.11 $6,780 $81,340
Georgia $40.23 $6,970 $83,680
Hawaii $58.98 $10,220 $122,670
Idaho $40.30 $6,990 $83,830
Illinois $41.95 $7,270 $87,250
Indiana $37.97 $6,580 $78,980
Iowa $35.20 $6,100 $73,220
Kansas $36.12 $6,260 $75,130
Kentucky $36.42 $6,310 $75,750
Louisiana $38.26 $6,630 $79,590
Maine $39.97 $6,930 $83,130
Maryland $45.90 $7,960 $95,480
Massachusetts $54.15 $9,390 $112,630
Michigan $41.62 $7,210 $86,570
Minnesota $45.55 $7,900 $94,740
Mississippi $34.46 $5,970 $71,680
Missouri $37.08 $6,430 $77,120
Montana $39.68 $6,880 $82,540
Nebraska $39.09 $6,780 $81,310
Nevada $50.50 $8,750 $105,030
New Hampshire $42.74 $7,410 $88,900
New Jersey $48.23 $8,360 $100,310
New Mexico $42.59 $7,380 $88,590
New York $50.50 $8,750 $105,040
North Carolina $38.79 $6,720 $80,690
North Dakota $39.17 $6,790 $81,480
Ohio $39.24 $6,800 $81,620
Oklahoma $37.47 $6,500 $77,940
Oregon $54.14 $9,380 $112,610
Pennsylvania $41.73 $7,230 $86,790
Rhode Island $46.58 $8,070 $96,880
South Carolina $37.77 $6,550 $78,570
South Dakota $34.30 $5,950 $71,340
Tennessee $36.07 $6,250 $75,030
Texas $43.21 $7,490 $89,870
Utah $39.59 $6,860 $82,350
Vermont $40.59 $7,040 $84,420
Virginia $41.85 $7,250 $87,040
Washington $51.37 $8,900 $106,850
West Virginia $36.64 $6,350 $76,220
Wisconsin $42.06 $7,290 $87,490
Wyoming $40.85 $7,080 $84,960



HIGHEST PAID CLINICAL NURSE EDUCATORS IN THE NATION


What Are The 10 Highest Paying States For Clinical Nurse Educators?


So, let’s now look at the highest paying states for clinical nurse educators. California is the highest paying state for clinical nurse educators. Here you will be earning $141,080 a year. Hawaii is not far behind, with you earning an annual $122,670. Massachusetts, Oregon, and Alaska will have you earning over $110,000 a year. States such as Washington, New York, Nevada, and New Jersey will have you earning salaries between $100,000 to $107,000. Connecticut will round out the top ten highest paying states for clinical nurse educators and have you earning $99,290.

Rank State Average
Annual Salary
1 California $141,080
2 Hawaii $122,670
3 Massachusetts $112,630
4 Oregon $112,610
5 Alaska $111,490
6 Washington $106,850
7 New York $105,040
8 Nevada $105,030
9 New Jersey $100,310
10 Connecticut $99,290


What Are The 10 Highest Paying Metros For Clinical Nurse Educators?


So, we already know that California is the highest paying state for clinical nurse educators. Still, within California, some metros pay a great deal of money for your expertise. Let's take a look at the highest-paying metros for clinical nurse educators. The highest paying metro for Clinical nurse educators is San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, CA. Here you can earn $174,600. San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA, is not far behind, with an average annual salary of $171,870. Redding, CA, is the lowest paying metro out of the top ten highest paying metros. Here you will still earn an impressive average annual salary of $130,900.

Rank Metro Average
Annual Salary
1 San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, CA $174,600
2 San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA $171,870
3 Vallejo-Fairfield, CA $166,330
4 Sacramento--Roseville--Arden-Arcade, CA $157,220
5 Salinas, CA $154,660
6 Santa Rosa, CA $146,090
7 Modesto, CA $141,700
8 Stockton-Lodi, CA $135,580
9 Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, CA $132,370
10 Redding, CA $130,900



Top Organizations And Associations For Clinical Nurse Educators


National League for Nursing: The National League for Nursing promotes excellence in nursing education to build a stable and diverse workforce that can advance our nation's health. This is done through innovative educational programs, rigorous accreditation standards, and promoting Excellence in Nursing Education.

Association for Nursing Professional Development (ANPD): The Association for Nursing Professional Development (ANPD) advances the specialty practice of nursing professional development. These standards are based on research, critical to quality patient outcomes, as well as organizational solutions to promote healthy competition within healthcare organizations across all industries.


My Final Thoughts


So, are you ready to become a clinical nurse educator? There are pros and cons to being a clinical nurse educator. It is essential to be aware of both sides of the equation before making your decision. In the end, it is up to you to decide if the pros of being a clinical nurse educator outweigh the cons. Weighing your options is an essential part of any decision-making process.

We hope that the top 10 pros and cons of being a clinical nurse educator + salary + steps to become one has helped you decide on your future career.


FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ANSWERED BY OUR EXPERT


1. Is Clinical Nurse Educator A Good Career?

Yes, being a clinical nurse educator is a good career. Not only will you make a great living, but you will also be able to have an excellent work-life balance. Many jobs in healthcare cannot say that.


2. On Average, How Much Does A Clinical Nurse Educator Make Per Hour?

The average hourly salary for clinical nurse educators is around $45.01. This hourly wage is much higher than the national hourly rate.

$45.01


3. How Many Hours A Week Does A Clinical Nurse Educator Work?

The number of hours that a clinical nurse educator works a week is dependent on what type of setting you work in. The average number of hours you will be working is between 37.5 and 40 hours a week if you are a full-time employee.

Part-time employees will work somewhere around twenty hours a week. If you are a per diem employee, the number of hours you work will depend upon your agreed contract with the institution you work for.


4. Is Being A Clinical Nurse Educator Stressful?

As with any career, you will experience times of stress. It is how you deal with the stress that matters. If you let it consume you, it can be very stressful. But suppose you have good time management skills and are able to juggle multiple tasks at once. In that case, being a clinical nurse educator can be a rewarding career choice.


5. Do I Need To Be Certified To Work As A Clinical Nurse Educator?

You do not have to be certified to be a clinical nurse educator. It is, however, recommended that you become certified.


6. What Certifications Are Required Or Recommended For A Clinical Nurse Educator?

Suppose you are interested in becoming a Certified Nurse Educator (CNE). In that case, you must take and pass the National League of Nursing (NLN) certified nurse educator certification exam.

The criteria to sit for the certification exam are:

An active registered nurse (RN) license
A master's or doctoral degree in nursing

Master's or doctoral degree in nursing and a post-master's certificate in nursing education
Master's or doctoral degree in nursing and nine or more credits hours of graduate-level education courses



7. How Long Does It Take To Become A Clinical Nurse Educator?

It will take you around six years to become a clinical nurse educator. You will need four years to complete your Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN). You will then need an additional two years to complete your Master's in the science of nursing degree (MSN).


8. How Much Does It Cost To Become A Clinical Nurse Educator?

To become a clinical nurse educator, you will have to be prepared to spend anywhere from $20,000 to $200,000 for your bachelor's of nursing education. A master's degree in nursing will cost you anywhere from cost is $18,810 to $185,280.


9. What Kind Of Career Advancement Opportunities Are There For Clinical Nurse Educators?

The career advancement opportunities that are available to clinical nurse educators vary depending on their educational background, clinical experience, and personal preferences. Some clinical nurse educators may choose to pursue a Doctoral degree in nursing education. While others may prefer to stay in the clinical setting and take on additional responsibilities such as mentoring new nurses or leading special projects. Some nurse educators may also choose to leave the bedside altogether and become full-time faculty members at a nursing school.


10. What Are The 5 Most Common Clinical Nurse Educator Interview Questions?

The five most common interview questions for clinical nurse educators are:

1. What motivated you to pursue a career in nursing education?
2. What do you think are the key attributes of a successful clinical nurse educator?
3. What do you think is the most important role of a clinical nurse educator?
4. What do you think are the biggest challenges facing clinical nurse educators today?
5. Where do you see yourself in five years?

11. Is A Clinical Nurse Educator A Clinical Nurse Specialist?

A clinical nurse educator and a clinical nurse specialist are two very different types of nurses. A clinical nurse educator is someone responsible for the education and training of nurses. They may work in a hospital setting or work in a nursing school.

A clinical nurse specialist is a registered nurse who has completed advanced coursework and has additional skills and knowledge in a particular area of nursing. Clinical nurse specialists are the teachers in the clinical setting. They are viewed as the experts in a specific field of nursing. A clinical nurse specialist does not teach in the classroom or academic setting.


12. What Is The Difference Between A Clinical Nurse Educator And A Nurse Administrator?

The critical difference between a clinical nurse educator and a nurse administrator is that a clinical nurse educator focuses on providing educational opportunities and support to nurses. In contrast, a nurse administrator manages nursing staff and resources.


13. What Is The Most Important Role Of A Clinical Nurse Educator In A Hospital?

The most important role of a clinical nurse educator in the hospital is to provide support, guidance, and education to nurses. The clinical nurse educator is responsible for ensuring that nurses are able to provide quality patient care. They also play a vital role in developing new nurses and the continuing education of experienced nurses.


14. What Are The Professions Similar To A Clinical Nurse Educator?

The professions that are similar to a clinical nurse educator are teaching, nursing, and research. All three of these professions require a passion for helping others learn and grow in their profession. Each one also requires excellent communication skills, patience, and the ability to work with a diverse group of people.


15. How Many Questions Are On The NLN CNE Exam?

The exam has 150 multiple-choice questions with four answer options. However, only 130 of the questions will be counted towards your score; the additional 20 are pretest questions used for validation of future exams to make them more efficient and improve quality control on test content.


16. What Is The Passing Score For The NLN CNE Exam?

The passing score on the NLN CNE exam is at least 96 correct out of 130. A minimum score of 70% is required to pass the exam.


17. What Are The Benefits Of NLN CNE Certification?

The benefits of earning CNE certification include being seen as an expert in the field of nursing education. Other benefits include having a voice in policymaking, opportunities for professional development, and increased knowledge and skills.


Jennifer Schlette MSN, RN
Jennifer Schlette is a registered nurse in pediatric critical care in New York City. She is the former Director of Undergraduate Nursing at a college located in New York. After obtaining her BSN from the College of Mount Saint Vincent, she went on to complete her MSN.