2024 RN to BSN Salary – Learn How Much RN to BSN Graduates Earn?


Written By: Editorial Staff @ NursingProcess.org


If you are thinking of pursuing an RN to BSN program and you already have a diploma or an associate degree (ADN), you may wonder whether it is worth the time, money, and effort to pursue a baccalaureate education. There are plenty of benefits associated with a BSN degree and how it can change the path of your career for the better. Below you will learn everything you need to know about an RN to BSN salary, in addition to the projected job outlook and career advancement opportunities.



RECOMMENDED ONLINE RN TO BSN PROGRAMS

RN to BSN Salary: How Much More will an RN with BSN Earn?


Hourly:

Without a BSN, RNs earn an average hourly wage of $38.78, and this may or may not include overtime hours. However, with a BSN, they earn an average hourly wage that is $5.72 per hour more at $44.50 an hour. This is a significant raise that can make a tremendous difference in the size of your paychecks.

Monthly:

Before a BSN, RNs earn roughly $6,720 a month. After completing an RN to BSN program, they will earn around $7,710 a month, or $990 more.

Annual:

This is where the BSN salary vs. ADN salary truly shines. Prior to obtaining BSNs, RNs earn an average of $80,660 a year, but afterward, they earn $92,560 a year. This is a difference of $11,900 a year, which can go a long way over the course of 25, 30, or even 35 years. Over 35 years, you could have paid off a nice three-bedroom house in most states from the additional income alone.

Average Salary
Hourly Monthly Annual
RN with BSN$44.50 $7,710 $92,560
RN without BSN$38.78 $6,720 $80,660
How much more will an RN with BSN earn+$5.72 +$990 +$11,900
(Source: NP Editorial Assessment)


RN to BSN Salary: Salary by Level of Experience Compared to RN without BSN


Your experience will have a lot to do with your RN to BSN salary, as well. With up to five years of experience, you can earn an average salary that tops out at as high as $70,190, but by the time you have 20 years of experience or more, that salary climbs to as much as $136,210. Though this is not the only factor that can influence your salary as a BSN-educated RN, it is one of the most important. Keep in mind that many of the benefits associated with obtaining higher education will only make themselves known to you in time.

Level of Experience RN without BSN RN with BSN
0-5 Years of Experience $61,170 $70,190
5-10 Years of Experience $74,500 $85,500
10-20 Years of Experience $92,740 $106,420
20 Years or More Experience $118,700 $136,210
(Source: NP Editorial Assessment)


RN to BSN Salary: State Wise Average Salary Figures Compared to RN without BSN


The difference in salary you might notice after completing an RN to BSN program will also vary somewhat from one state to the next. States that tend to pay RNs more in general often seem to have the biggest pay differential between degrees, too. As an example, in California, where RNs earn $139,250 before they obtain a bachelor’s degree, they earn $17,900 more once they do have the degree for a post-BSN salary of $121,350.

State RN with
BSN
RN without
BSN
How Much More Will
an RN with BSN Earn
Alabama $67,850 $59,130 +$8,720
Alaska $108,110 $94,210 +$13,900
Arizona $90,500 $78,860 +$11,640
Arkansas $67,500 $58,820 +$8,680
California $139,250 $121,350 +$17,900
Colorado $90,700 $79,040 +$11,660
Connecticut $98,990 $86,260 +$12,730
Delaware $89,220 $77,750 +$11,470
District of Columbia $102,090 $88,970 +$13,120
Florida $81,550 $71,060 +$10,490
Georgia $88,670 $77,270 +$11,400
Hawaii $119,560 $104,190 +$15,370
Idaho $82,350 $71,760 +$10,590
Illinois $86,150 $75,070 +$11,080
Indiana $77,800 $67,800 +$10,000
Iowa $72,330 $63,030 +$9,300
Kansas $73,840 $64,340 +$9,500
Kentucky $78,810 $68,680 +$10,130
Louisiana $78,310 $68,240 +$10,070
Maine $81,790 $71,270 +$10,520
Maryland $91,110 $79,390 +$11,720
Massachusetts $111,530 $97,190 +$14,340
Michigan $84,370 $73,520 +$10,850
Minnesota $92,390 $80,510 +$11,880
Mississippi $70,050 $61,040 +$9,010
Missouri $75,330 $65,640 +$9,690
Montana $81,810 $71,290 +$10,520
Nebraska $78,180 $68,120 +$10,060
Nevada $102,080 $88,950 +$13,130
New Hampshire $86,570 $75,440 +$11,130
New Jersey $101,100 $88,100 +$13,000
New Mexico $89,470 $77,970 +$11,500
New York $102,410 $89,240 +$13,170
North Carolina $81,150 $70,710 +$10,440
North Dakota $77,580 $67,600 +$9,980
Ohio $81,100 $70,670 +$10,430
Oklahoma $77,960 $67,940 +$10,020
Oregon $112,410 $97,950 +$14,460
Pennsylvania $84,740 $73,850 +$10,890
Rhode Island $91,440 $79,680 +$11,760
South Carolina $77,390 $67,440 +$9,950
South Dakota $68,040 $59,290 +$8,750
Tennessee $74,410 $64,840 +$9,570
Texas $86,340 $75,230 +$11,110
Utah $81,010 $70,600 +$10,410
Vermont $83,670 $72,910 +$10,760
Virginia $85,280 $74,310 +$10,970
Washington $107,670 $93,820 +$13,850
West Virginia $75,410 $65,720 +$9,690
Wisconsin $84,720 $73,830 +$10,890
Wyoming $82,190 $71,620 +$10,570
(Source: NP Editorial Assessment)


Annual Job Openings - RN with BSN vs RN without BSN


Job security is another important factor, particularly when it comes to choosing the job that best suits your personal needs. RNs who do not have a BSN degree have access to 59,740 new and replacement jobs each year, while those who do have BSN degrees have access to 107,490 jobs. That’s a difference of more than 47,750 jobs, and some of these offer better hours and benefits, too.

Annual Job Openings
(New + Replacement)
RN with BSN107,490
RN without BSN59,740
How many more jobs are available for RNs with BSN 47,750
(Source: NP Editorial Assessment)


State Wise Annual Job Openings - RN with BSN vs RN without BSN


The states that hire the highest number of RNs boast the largest increase in jobs for RNs who successfully earn BSN degrees. California offers RNs without BSN degrees access to 6,230 jobs each year compared to the 11, 210 jobs offered to baccalaureate-educated RNs each year in the same state. That’s a difference of 4,980 jobs for RNs who further their education.

State Projected Annual Average
Job Openings (New + Replacement)
How many more jobs are
available for RNs with BSN
RN with BSN RN without BSN
Alabama 1,680 930 750
Alaska 210 120 90
Arizona 3,140 1,740 1,400
Arkansas 870 480 390
California 11,210 6,230 4,980
Colorado 2,340 1,300 1,040
Connecticut 1,040 580 460
Delaware 430 240 190
District of Columbia 330 180 150
Florida 7,010 3,900 3,110
Georgia 2,890 1,610 1,280
Hawaii 390 220 170
Idaho 590 330 260
Illinois 4,160 2,310 1,850
Indiana 2,180 1,210 970
Iowa 1,170 650 520
Kansas 1,000 560 440
Kentucky 1,440 800 640
Louisiana 1,200 670 530
Maine 440 250 190
Maryland 2,780 1,540 1,240
Massachusetts 3,120 1,730 1,390
Michigan 3,360 1,870 1,490
Minnesota 2,290 1,270 1,020
Mississippi 1,060 590 470
Missouri 2,330 1,300 1,030
Montana 370 210 160
Nebraska 900 500 400
Nevada 1,030 570 460
New Hampshire 470 260 210
New Jersey 2,770 1,540 1,230
New Mexico 690 380 310
New York 7,630 4,240 3,390
North Carolina 3,590 1,990 1,600
North Dakota 370 210 160
Ohio 4,230 2,350 1,880
Oklahoma 1,390 770 620
Oregon 1,360 760 600
Pennsylvania 4,910 2,730 2,180
Rhode Island 390 220 170
South Carolina 1,620 900 720
South Dakota 480 260 220
Tennessee 2,490 1,380 1,110
Texas 8,580 4,770 3,810
Utah 1,020 560 460
Vermont 240 130 110
Virginia 2,220 1,230 990
Washington 2,870 1,600 1,270
West Virginia 760 420 340
Wisconsin 1,940 1,080 860
Wyoming 170 100 70
(Source: NP Editorial Assessment)


10 Year Employment Outlook – RN with BSN vs RN without BSN


Before earning your bachelor’s degree, you can expect 4.46% growth in the nursing field between 2021 and 2031 with the addition of 41,790 jobs. However, after earning your BSN, that number skyrockets to 119,020 jobs, representing growth of 7.26%. There are many different reasons for this, but a few stand out as the most important. Of these, the Institute of Medicine’s push to have 80% of all RNs in the country educated at the BSN level or above by 2020 is the biggest driving force. This comes in direct response to studies showing that higher education among nursing staff has a significant positive impact on patient outcomes.

Employment New Job
Growth (2021-2031)
2021 2031 Number %
RN with BSN 1,640,430 1,759,450 119,020 7.26%
RN without BSN 936,050 977,840 41,790 4.46%
How many more new jobs are
projected to be created for RNs with BSN
704,380 781,610 77,230 2.80%
(Source: NP Editorial Assessment)


State Wise 10 Year Employment Outlook – RN with BSN vs RN without BSN


The state in which you work will play a role in your overall employment outlook between the years of 2021 and 2031, as well. The nursing shortage has reached crisis levels in some states, and in these locations, you will have access to numerous jobs. Some of the best examples of this include states like California, Florida, New York, and Pennsylvania. Of course, growing populations also have an effect. In California, RNs without BSNs will have access to 8,670 new jobs in this timeframe; those who have BSNs will have access to 20,140.

State Employment RN with BSN Employment RN without BSN Employment Growth (2021-2031) How many more new jobs are projected to be created for RNs with BSN
2021 2031 2021 2031 RN with BSN RN without BSN
Alabama 26,870 29,330 15,330 16,300 2,460 970 1,490
Alaska 2,980 3,440 1,700 1,910 460 210 250
Arizona 30,640 43,090 17,490 23,950 12,450 6,460 5,990
Arkansas 13,570 14,940 7,740 8,300 1,370 560 810
California 169,720 189,860 96,850 105,520 20,140 8,670 11,470
Colorado 27,820 36,110 15,880 20,070 8,290 4,190 4,100
Connecticut 18,060 18,950 10,310 10,530 890 220 670
Delaware 6,110 7,060 3,490 3,920 950 430 520
District of Columbia 5,540 5,900 3,160 3,280 360 120 240
Florida 99,100 114,530 56,550 63,650 15,430 7,100 8,330
Georgia 38,350 45,730 21,880 25,410 7,380 3,530 3,850
Hawaii 6,170 6,770 3,520 3,760 600 240 360
Idaho 8,040 9,730 4,590 5,410 1,690 820 870
Illinois 71,600 75,590 40,860 42,010 3,990 1,150 2,840
Indiana 34,970 38,060 19,960 21,150 3,090 1,190 1,900
Iowa 17,350 19,610 9,900 10,900 2,260 1,000 1,260
Kansas 16,200 17,560 9,250 9,760 1,360 510 850
Kentucky 22,700 24,940 12,950 13,860 2,240 910 1,330
Louisiana 21,980 22,580 12,540 12,550 600 10 590
Maine 7,830 8,170 4,470 4,540 340 70 270
Maryland 37,410 44,280 21,350 24,610 6,870 3,260 3,610
Massachusetts 46,040 52,140 26,270 28,980 6,100 2,710 3,390
Michigan 53,760 58,590 30,670 32,560 4,830 1,890 2,940
Minnesota 37,610 40,490 21,460 22,500 2,880 1,040 1,840
Mississippi 15,340 17,570 8,750 9,770 2,230 1,020 1,210
Missouri 38,420 41,330 21,930 22,970 2,910 1,040 1,870
Montana 5,600 6,250 3,190 3,470 650 280 370
Nebraska 14,500 15,770 8,270 8,760 1,270 490 780
Nevada 12,600 15,670 7,190 8,710 3,070 1,520 1,550
New Hampshire 7,340 8,060 4,190 4,480 720 290 430
New Jersey 43,840 48,060 25,010 26,710 4,220 1,700 2,520
New Mexico 9,820 11,290 5,600 6,280 1,470 680 790
New York 103,310 121,980 58,950 67,790 18,670 8,840 9,830
North Carolina 53,530 60,260 30,540 33,490 6,730 2,950 3,780
North Dakota 5,270 6,060 3,010 3,370 790 360 430
Ohio 68,850 74,470 39,290 41,390 5,620 2,100 3,520
Oklahoma 20,500 23,170 11,700 12,880 2,670 1,180 1,490
Oregon 21,480 24,320 12,260 13,520 2,840 1,260 1,580
Pennsylvania 77,170 84,840 44,040 47,150 7,670 3,110 4,560
Rhode Island 6,640 7,060 3,790 3,920 420 130 290
South Carolina 24,650 27,530 14,070 15,300 2,880 1,230 1,650
South Dakota 7,040 7,960 4,020 4,420 920 400 520
Tennessee 33,680 39,750 19,220 22,090 6,070 2,870 3,200
Texas 115,790 136,860 66,070 76,060 21,070 9,990 11,080
Utah 13,020 15,770 7,430 8,770 2,750 1,340 1,410
Vermont 3,630 4,030 2,070 2,240 400 170 230
Virginia 35,290 38,560 20,130 21,430 3,270 1,300 1,970
Washington 32,260 37,850 18,410 21,040 5,590 2,630 2,960
West Virginia 11,290 12,750 6,440 7,090 1,460 650 810
Wisconsin 33,850 35,510 19,310 19,730 1,660 420 1,240
(Source: NP Editorial Assessment)


Post RN to BSN - Opportunities to Advance My Career


Career advancement is another important consideration, and by finishing an RN to BSN program, you can improve your qualifications. These programs put a great deal of focus on leadership and management, for example, which means you can work as a charge nurse, a nurse manager, or nurse supervisor. The program is also heavily research-focused in some cases, which is a great opportunity for you to learn more about the role of registered nursing in groundbreaking research and use your skills to advance global medicine. Finally, you might also go into case management, which requires you to coordinate care for your patients.

Advancement Opportunities
Case Management Nurse Director of Nursing
Charge Nurse Nurse Educator
Chief Nursing Officer Nurse Manager
Clinical Nurse Specialist Nurse Supervisor
Clinical Research Nurse Nursing Informatics Specialist
Head Nurse Nursing Specialist


Post RN to BSN - Opportunities to Study Further


Simply having a bachelor’s degree in nursing will open many doors, but you might decide to pursue further education. This will have a tremendous impact on your job, your salary, and your future employment opportunities.

Master’s Degree (MSN/MS)


Goal of MSN/MS Program:

MSN/MS programs result in a master’s degree in nursing which will provide you with better career prospects and prepare you for leadership roles. For instance, this will include learning how to run a healthcare facility as a business, or even teach or recruit nurses.

MSN/MS Program Length (1-2 years):

The MSN/MS program length will vary somewhat, but it will take you an average of two years to complete. Some programs can be completed in a little over one year, though these are rare.

Post MSN/MS Career Paths:

After completing your master’s degree, there are dozens of different career paths you can take. Some of the most popular include family nurse practitioner, certified nurse midwife, nurse manager, patient safety director, and quality improvement executive, among others.

List of MSN/MS Careers
Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Family Nurse Practitioner Nurse Ethicist
Adult-Gerontology Nurse Practitioner Forensic Nurse Consultant Nurse Manager
Certified Nurse Midwife Health Care Attorney Patient Safety Director
Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist Healthcare Administrator Pediatrics Nurse Practitioner
Clinical Nurse Researcher Healthcare Executive Professional Practice Director
Clinical Nurse Specialist Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner
Community Services Manager Nurse Administrator Quality Improvement Executive
Department Manager Nurse Consultant Staff Development Director
Director of Nursing Nurse Educator Women's Health Nurse Practitioner


MSN/MS Degree Holder Salary:

After earning your master’s degree, you will experience a significant increase in your salary. On average, that salary increases to as much as $145,470, or the equivalent of $69.94 an hour. With more knowledge and abilities comes more responsibility, especially in healthcare. Employers pay handsome salaries to attract the best possible nursing talent.

Type Salary
Hourly$37.12 - $69.94
Monthly$6,430 - $12,120
Annual$77,200 - $145,470
(Source: NP Editorial Assessment)


Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)/Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Degree


Goal of PhD/DNP Program:

A PhD or DNP degree is a doctorate degree, which represents the highest degree of its kind. Medical doctors have PhD degrees, too, which helps to shine some light on just how involved it can be to get this level of education. The goal is to provide you with as much knowledge as possible, allowing you to not only work directly with patients, but also train and mentor other healthcare providers.

PhD/DNP Program Length (4-6 Years):

PhD and DNP programs take anywhere from four to six years to complete, and this includes not only the time you spend studying, but also time spent participating in clinicals.

Post PhD/DNP Career Paths:

After completing your doctorate degree, there are many high-profile positions to aim for. You could work as a chief nurse anesthetist, a clinical research director, a nurse midwife, or even a healthcare lobbyist who brings information to local, state, and federal politicians for their consideration in lawmaking.

List of PhD/DNP Careers
Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Health Policy Analyst
Adult Nurse Practitioner Healthcare Organization CEO
Chief Nurse Anesthetist Heath Care Lobbyist
Chief Nursing Officer Manager of Informatics
Clinical Nurse Specialist Neonatal Nurse Practitioner
Clinical Research Director Nurse Manager/Director
College / University Professor Nurse Midwife
Director of Nursing Services Nurse Researcher
Director/Manager of Health Policy Pediatrics Nurse Practitioner
Family Nurse Practitioner Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner
Health Care Executive Women's Health Nurse Practitioner


PhD/DNP Degree Holder Salary:

After earning your PhD or DNP degree, your salary can skyrocket. On the high end of the scale, you can earn as much as $160,800, which is equal to $77.31 an hour or $13,400 a month – almost the same as a physician if not more in some states. Your new position comes with a great deal of responsibility, and because of this, you can expect a much higher salary than with a BSN or MSN degree.

Type Salary
Hourly$41.03 - $77.31
Monthly$7,110 - $13,400
Annual$85,340 - $160,800
(Source: NP Editorial Assessment)


Conclusion: Is the Time, Efforts and Money that will go into earning an RN to BSN worth It?


With all this information in mind, it stands to reason that completing an RN to BSN program is almost always the best course of action. The salary is higher, the job outlook is better, and other paths to master’s and doctorate degrees become clear to you, as well. What’s more, due in part to the push to educate 80% of nurses at the BSN level, many states now offer RN to BSN programs in community colleges, which makes them incredibly affordable – especially with grants and scholarships to help absorb some of the costs. Though it may take some time for the salary change to become noticeable, you will have access to more (and better) jobs immediately after completion.


More Nursing Salaries


RN to BSN Programs in Your City & State