Registered Nurse Salary 2023: How Much Does an RN Make?


Written By: Editorial Staff @ NursingProcess.org

If you have considered a career in healthcare, becoming a registered nurse (RN) is a great option when it comes to salary, job security, and overall fulfillment. Here, you will learn more about how much money you can earn, how to ensure the highest possible registered nurse salary, and much more. This is the most in-depth and most accurate representation of a modern career in registered nursing available online today, and our figures are based on information provided by the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics from May 2022.



RECOMMENDED ONLINE RN TO BSN PROGRAMS

What Education and Licensure is Required to Become an RN?


In order to earn a handsome salary as an RN, it is important to obtain the right level of education. Without it, you cannot become licensed to work. There are six different education paths you can take to become a licensed RN, and each one presents its own unique benefits. Regardless of the program you choose, you should always choose a program that was designed to prepare you for the National Council Licensure Examination. You can only obtain your license to practice as an RN after passing this exam. The six education options shown below all have different costs and academic qualifications, so be sure to consider each one carefully.

Program Type Minimum Requirements Program Length Program Cost
Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN)• High school graduation or equivalence
• Minimum cumulative High School GPA of 2.5 or higher
2 Years$3,280 - $125,560
Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN)• High school graduation or equivalence
• Minimum cumulative High School GPA of 2.5 or higher
4 Years$14,190 - $233,650
Accelerated BSN • Bachelor's degree from an accredited college/university in any major
• Minimum cumulative undergraduate GPA of 2.5 or higher
1 to 2 years$38,210 - $131,020
Entry Level Master’s (ELM)• Bachelor's degree from an accredited college/university in any major
• Minimum cumulative undergraduate GPA of 2.5 or higher
2 to 3 years$45,860 - $148,480
LPN to RN• Graduation from an accredited or state-approved LPN program
• Valid/current LPN license
• Minimum GPA of 2.5 or higher on all completed college-level coursework
1 to 2 Years$6,550 - $93,890
LPN to BSN • Graduation from an accredited or state-approved LPN program
• Valid/current LPN license
• Minimum GPA of 3.0 or higher on all completed college-level coursework
2 to 4 years$27,300 - $174,690
*Exact requirements, program length


How many Registered Nurses are Currently Employed in the United States?


As the US population continues to grow, the demand for highly qualified healthcare professionals increases, as well. There are currently 3,072,700 registered nurses in the United States serving a population of roughly 334 million people.

3,072,700


What Is the Starting Salary of a Registered Nurse?


The starting salary of a registered nurse in the US is $61,250 per year on average. Numerous factors influence this number, including the state and location where you work, the type of employment you choose, whether you work full-time or part-time, any additional certifications you may have, and the type of nursing program you completed. California’s RNs are the highest paid in the country; registered nurses in South Dakota are paid the least.

Starting Salary
$61,250


What Is the Average Salary of a Registered Nurse?


Hourly: On average, RNs across the US earn $42.79 an hour, and if they earn overtime pay, this goes up to $62.21 an hour for anything over 40 hours. Most RNs are paid on an hourly basis rather than a weekly or monthly salary in order to ensure they are properly compensated for their long hours. Factors that can increase hourly wages include experience, education, and more.

Monthly: Though registered nurses are typically paid weekly or biweekly, understanding monthly salary can help in terms of budgeting. On average, RNs in the US earn a monthly salary of about $7,420.

Annual: Finally, the average annual salary for an RN in the United States is $89,010, which is well above the national average salary for all occupations. Annual salaries are influenced by numerous factors, including things like location, experience, additional education, specialization, and more. Some nurses may also earn bonuses throughout the year which can further drive annual salaries, but this is not the case in all locations.

Type Salary
Hourly Wage$42.79
Monthly Salary$7,420
Annual Salary$89,010
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


Percentile Wage Estimates for RN Workers in United States


Percentile wage estimates provide a broader view of what RNs across the country earn on average by grouping them into categories. The bottom 10% of RNs, for example, earn less than $29.45 an hour ($61,250 annually). This is likely due to a combination of little experience, a low-paying location, and the type of employer. On the other hand, the top 10% of RNs earn more than $62.21 an hour ($129,400 annually.) These nurses likely have years of experience working in high-stress environments, a longstanding track record for positive patient outcomes, and years of continuing education. The median 50% of RNs earn somewhere between $32.06 and $48.61 an hour ($66,680 and $101,100 annually) and are a more accurate representation of what to expect later in your career.

Percent
of RN’s
Number
of RN's
Hourly
Wage
Monthly
Salary
Annual
Salary
10% 307,270 Under $29.45 Under $5,100 Under $61,250
15% 460,905 $29.45 - $32.06 $5,100 - $5,560 $61,250 - $66,680
25% 768,175 $32.06 - $39.05 $5,560 - $6,770 $66,680 - $81,220
25% 768,175 $39.05 - $48.61 $6,770 - $8,430 $81,220 - $101,100
15% 460,905 $48.61 - $62.21 $8,430 - $10,780 $101,100 - $129,400
10% 307,270 Above $62.21 Above $10,780 Above $129,400
Average $42.79 $7,420 $89,010
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


Along with Salary What Other Benefits Will I Be Eligible to Receive as an RN?


RNs can receive some exciting salaries, especially after several years of experience in their fields, but they also receive a variety of other valuable benefits that can serve them well throughout their lives. In fact, their salaries only make up for about 70.50% of their overall compensation in private industries. Paid leave, supplemental pay, employer-provided insurance, 401(k) and other retirement savings make a large impact and can really add up. When all other forms of compensation have been considered, RNs working in private industries earn an average of $126,227 and those working for state and local governments earn $143,758 in total.

Compensation Component Private Industry State and Local Government
Compensation % Salary Compensation % Salary
Paid Leave 7.50% $9,467 7.30% $10,494
Supplemental Pay 3.70% $4,670 1% $1,438
Insurance 7.40% $9,341 11.30% $16,245
Retirement and Savings 3.40% $4,292 13.00% $18,689
Legally Required 7.50% $9,467 5.40% $7,763
Total Benefits 29.50% $37,237 38.00% $54,628
Average Annual Salary 70.50% $88,990 62.00% $89,130
Total Compensation 100% $126,227 100% $143,758
(Source: In-House Research)


Average Registered Nurse Salary Based On 6 Major Salary Websites – (Bls.Com, Salary.Com, Glassdoor.Com, PayScale.Com, Indeed.Com, Ziprecruiter & SimplyHired.Com)


Different websites use different algorithms and criteria to determine the average salaries of registered nurses. Some only consider salaries for RNs who are hired through their services, and others, such as PayScale, factor in things like pay gaps and salary histories rather than projections. The table below shows the average salary for registered nurses as made available from each of six very popular websites. PayScale reports the lowest RN salary at $70,881 on average, and Glassdoor reports the highest at $99,307.

Website Annual Salary
BLS $89,010
Glassdoor $99,307
PayScale $70,881
Indeed $93,862
CareerBuilder $89,000
SimplyHired $82,765
Average $87,471


12 Factors That Will Play an Important Role in Determining How Much I Will Earn


As with most other career choices, your salary as a registered nurse is never set in stone. There are 12 different factors that will play a noticeable role in your salary, and you can read about each one below.

1. Location: RNs working in busy metro areas tend to earn more than their rural counterparts. For example, registered nurses in the state of California earn $84,700 - $177,670 a year, which is well above the national average. Conversely, nurses in Arkansas earn $37,630 - $83,700 a year due to its sparser population.

2. Experience: Thanks to the increasing demand for positive patient outcomes, employers pay nurses with more experience much higher salaries. The more experience you have, particularly in a certain field or specialty, the more you are likely to earn.

3. Education: The more education you obtain, the more positions you qualify to fill. With an ADN, for example, you will perform only basic RN tasks and earn an average of $80,660 a year. If you pursue a BSN, you could then work in management, administrative, or leadership positions, and you would enjoy an average annual salary of $92,560. Finally, with an MSN degree, you truly open the door to many opportunities. You could become a nurse practitioner, for example, and earn an average of $124,680 each year.

4. Position: You can work in various positions as an RN, giving you flexibility and freedom throughout your career. For example, you could be the “lead” nurse or the shift manager, which leads to a substantial pay increase.

5. Type of Nursing (Specialization): RNs can specialize in various fields with a BSN degree. For example, you might choose to work with children, in a labor and maternity ward, in a psychiatric facility, or even in a public health department. All of these specializations pay differently.

6. Certifications: Depending on your employer, it may be possible to increase your salary with certain certifications. For example, you could become certified to work with patients dealing with HIV/AIDS, to assist patients on dialysis, or even to provide correctional behavioral health. When you obtain the right certifications for the right employers, you become invaluable – and your salary reflects it.

7. Type of Industry: If you work in private healthcare, you will likely earn slightly less than if you work in government-provided healthcare – such as for the VA. Government-paid healthcare providers tend to earn more than those who are privately paid by their employers.

8. Size of the Organization & Capacity of The Organization to Pay: Another important consideration is the overall size of your employer’s organization. If you work for a large chain of high-tech hospitals, this employer is in a much better position to pay you a high salary than if you work in a clinic where one recently-licensed doctor provides his services.

9. Memberships in Professional Organizations: Becoming a member of a professional organization shows your dedication to your career and your desire to continue learning and truly make a difference in healthcare. There is an organization for virtually every specialization, including the American Assembly for Men in Nursing, the Academy of Neonatal Nursing, and the American Holistic Nurses Association just to name a few.

10. Shift Differentials: Shift differentials are slight differences in your pay rate depending on the hours you work. They are often given to evening and night shift workers, and they are usually hourly differentials. For example, RNs working evening shifts (2pm-11pm) may earn anywhere from an extra $0.50 to $2.00 on the hour and third shift RNs (11pm to 7am) can earn even more.

11. Performance Reports: Performance reports are outstanding indicators of your ability to facilitate positive patient outcomes, and they are also important when it comes to boosting your salary. In fact, most raises are based almost solely on your performance and your overall attendance. The better you perform, the more money you can earn.

12. Hazardous Working Conditions: Finally, in order to entice RNs to work in less-than-appealing conditions, employers may offer a premium salary. For example, nurses who work in emergency rooms late at night in heavily populated areas are exposed to dangerous activity, which may call for a salary increase.


What Has Been the Average RN Salary Growth for The Last 5 Years (2018-2022)


Over the last five years, the average salary for an RN has grown by 21.02% - a significant amount and more than most other occupations. There are many things driving this growth, but the biggest include the aging population and their demand for medical care, more widespread access to healthcare than ever before, and better technologies to provide effective and safe medical treatments.

Year Salary Growth % Growth
2018 $75,510 $1,960 2.66%
2019 $77,460 $1,950 2.58%
2020 $80,010 $2,550 3.29%
2021 $82,750 $2,740 3.42%
2022 $89,010 $6,260 7.56%
Overall Growth in Five Years $15,460 21.02%
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


What Is the Projected 5 Year Average Annual RN Salary Growth (2023-2027)


There are several factors that will drive annual RN salary growth over the course of the next five years. Of these, the demand for high-quality, experienced healthcare providers will be at the top of the list. Providers are being held to higher standards, and for this reason, they are willing to pay more to secure the best possible RNs. Numerous states are experiencing RN shortages, meaning there are simply not enough knowledgeable and trained RNs to provide care to the population. As a result, employees must offer competitive salaries in order to attract employees.

Other factors that will drive salary increases include things such as the rising cost of living, inflation, and many states’ initiative to hire more RNs with BSN degrees over LPNs or RNs with ADN degrees. Research has shown that facilities employing a higher number of better-educated RNs tend to have better patient outcomes overall.

Year Annual Salary Growth % Growth
2023 $91,290 $2,280 2.56%
2024 $93,860 $2,570 2.82%
2025 $97,280 $3,420 3.64%
2026 $101,150 $3,870 3.98%
2027 $105,650 $4,500 4.45%
Overall Growth in Next Five Years $16,640 18.69%
(Source: In-House Research)


In Which Industries Do RNs Get Paid the Highest?


The industry in which you work is a huge deciding factor when it comes to your salary, so it is wise to consider which industry you would like to enter after graduating nursing school. RNs working for government-owned hospitals, colleges, and universities – as well as those working for the federal government itself – tend to earn the highest average annual salaries. First and foremost, if you choose to work for the government, it is important to consider that there are more resources available to provide higher pay. What’s more, government workers and those working in government-owned facilities often have access to some of the best benefits available in terms of healthcare and retirement savings, which drastically adds to salary.

Of course, there are benefits and downfalls associated with working in any industry, and there is more to consider than just salary. Consider this carefully when you make your own career choice.

Rank Industry Hourly
Wage
Monthly
Salary
Annual
Salary
Annual
Salary Range
1 Local Government Owned Colleges and Universities $54.90 $9,520 $114,200 $108,150 - $134,800
2 Temporary Help Services $50.55 $8,760 $105,150 $45,670 - $176,640
3 Federal Government $50.05 $8,680 $104,110 $76,710 - $138,530
4 Ambulance Services $47.01 $8,150 $97,770 $61,410 - $123,340
5 State Government Owned Hospitals $46.24 $8,020 $96,190 $64,030 - $140,370
6 Direct Insurance Carriers (Except Life, Health and Medical) $44.34 $7,690 $92,240 $79,040 - $107,120
7 State Government Owned Specialty Hospitals $44.16 $7,650 $91,840 $64,790 - $105,270
8 Specialty Hospitals $43.89 $7,610 $91,290 $64,790 - $125,470
9 Management of Companies and Enterprises $43.88 $7,610 $91,270 $62,500 - $129,680
10 State Government Owned Psychiatric and Substance Abuse Hospitals $43.72 $7,580 $90,950 $62,260 - $128,960
11 Private Hospitals $43.52 $7,540 $90,510 $63,220 - $129,380
12 Management, Scientific, And Technical Consulting Services $43.21 $7,490 $89,880 $64,060 - $118,860
13 Local Government Owned Hospitals $41.97 $7,280 $87,300 $60,870 - $128,850
14 Research and Development in The Physical, Engineering, And Life Sciences $41.83 $7,250 $87,000 $59,290 - $130,690
15 Privately Owned Colleges and Universities $41.76 $7,240 $86,860 $52,670 - $118,420
16 Offices of All Other Health Practitioners $41.68 $7,220 $86,690 $51,330 - $157,450
17 Office Administrative Services $41.48 $7,190 $86,280 $52,050 - $116,260
18 Direct Health and Medical Insurance Carriers $40.41 $7,000 $84,050 $63,770 - $100,710
19 Services for The Elderly and Persons with Disabilities $40.32 $6,990 $83,860 $49,270 - $139,920
20 Offices of Dentists $40.02 $6,940 $83,240 $48,210 - $199,110
21 Home Health Care Services $39.87 $6,910 $82,920 $59,160 - $109,810
22 Offices of Physical, Occupational and Speech Therapists and Audiologists $39.72 $6,890 $82,620 $56,670 - $104,410
23 Private Psychiatric and Substance Abuse Hospitals $39.09 $6,780 $81,310 $63,310 - $103,540
24 State Government Owned Colleges and Universities $39.07 $6,770 $81,270 $59,700 - $106,610
25 Medical and Diagnostic Laboratories $38.97 $6,760 $81,060 $51,470 - $124,330
26 Pharmacies and Drug Stores $38.74 $6,720 $80,580 $57,590 - $100,960
27 Offices of Physicians $38.37 $6,650 $79,810 $51,580 - $104,110
28 All Other Ambulatory Health Care Services $37.90 $6,570 $78,840 $57,330 - $101,670
29 Other Insurance Related Activities $37.80 $6,550 $78,630 $62,790 - $97,390
30 Residential Mental Health and Substance Abuse Facilities $37.50 $6,500 $78,000 $51,690 - $95,230
31 Outpatient Mental Health and Substance Abuse Centers $37.21 $6,450 $77,410 $49,300 - $106,960
32 Nursing Care Facilities $37.11 $6,430 $77,190 $61,940 - $97,410
33 Vocational Rehabilitation Services $35.55 $6,160 $73,950 $51,000 - $102,950
34 Other Residential Care Facilities $34.51 $5,980 $71,780 $51,870 - $88,720
35 Continuing Care Retirement Communities and Assisted Living Facilities for The Elderly $34.40 $5,960 $71,540 $50,670 - $92,800
36 Residential Intellectual and Developmental Disability Facilities $34.05 $5,900 $70,830 $49,120 - $93,450
37 Privately Owned Elementary and Secondary Schools $32.40 $5,620 $67,400 $36,390 - $96,070
38 Elementary and Secondary Schools $31.26 $5,420 $65,020 $39,050 - $96,460
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


Registered Nurse State Wise Salary


The state where you choose to practice will also have a significant impact on your salary. Typically, states with higher populations and access to more technology tend to charge more for healthcare services in general, which means RNs receive a higher pay.

State Hourly
Wage
Monthly
Salary
Annual
Salary
Annual
Salary Range
Alabama $32.17 $5,580 $66,910 $48,820 - $82,760
Alaska $49.67 $8,610 $103,310 $80,950 - $127,280
Arizona $41.70 $7,230 $86,740 $66,040 - $105,520
Arkansas $31.98 $5,540 $66,530 $37,630 - $83,700
California $64.10 $11,110 $133,340 $84,700 - $177,670
Colorado $41.63 $7,220 $86,590 $66,130 - $107,260
Connecticut $45.32 $7,860 $94,260 $71,050 - $119,600
Delaware $40.88 $7,090 $85,020 $64,100 - $101,110
District of Columbia $47.23 $8,190 $98,230 $66,260 - $135,260
Florida $38.42 $6,660 $79,910 $61,190 - $100,060
Georgia $40.95 $7,100 $85,180 $60,400 - $118,270
Hawaii $54.43 $9,440 $113,220 $76,640 - $137,710
Idaho $37.79 $6,550 $78,610 $61,530 - $100,440
Illinois $39.53 $6,850 $82,220 $62,180 - $102,080
Indiana $36.34 $6,300 $75,580 $55,200 - $95,600
Iowa $33.35 $5,780 $69,370 $56,330 - $83,360
Kansas $34.61 $6,000 $71,990 $52,010 - $93,120
Kentucky $37.32 $6,470 $77,620 $56,120 - $98,540
Louisiana $36.50 $6,330 $75,920 $57,500 - $95,540
Maine $37.22 $6,450 $77,410 $61,170 - $100,910
Maryland $42.30 $7,330 $87,990 $64,680 - $106,910
Massachusetts $50.07 $8,680 $104,150 $67,480 - $154,160
Michigan $38.78 $6,720 $80,660 $64,270 - $100,920
Minnesota $42.72 $7,410 $88,860 $65,500 - $107,960
Mississippi $32.66 $5,660 $67,930 $49,980 - $84,030
Missouri $34.55 $5,990 $71,860 $51,440 - $94,340
Montana $37.67 $6,530 $78,350 $62,930 - $98,970
Nebraska $35.34 $6,130 $73,510 $58,900 - $93,230
Nevada $46.30 $8,030 $96,310 $74,200 - $130,200
New Hampshire $40.11 $6,950 $83,420 $62,790 - $104,270
New Jersey $46.48 $8,060 $96,670 $76,650 - $118,150
New Mexico $41.15 $7,130 $85,580 $64,510 - $106,300
New York $48.14 $8,340 $100,130 $64,840 - $132,950
North Carolina $37.22 $6,450 $77,420 $59,580 - $100,430
North Dakota $36.06 $6,250 $75,000 $60,780 - $91,150
Ohio $37.72 $6,540 $78,450 $61,860 - $98,380
Oklahoma $36.98 $6,410 $76,920 $53,560 - $97,520
Oregon $51.26 $8,880 $106,610 $81,470 - $131,210
Pennsylvania $38.76 $6,720 $80,630 $61,450 - $101,450
Rhode Island $42.43 $7,350 $88,250 $65,260 - $104,790
South Carolina $35.74 $6,190 $74,330 $52,620 - $93,190
South Dakota $31.01 $5,380 $64,500 $51,240 - $80,860
Tennessee $34.85 $6,040 $72,480 $51,270 - $95,490
Texas $40.54 $7,030 $84,320 $61,950 - $105,270
Utah $36.73 $6,370 $76,400 $61,850 - $98,000
Vermont $38.46 $6,670 $79,990 $60,900 - $101,570
Virginia $39.36 $6,820 $81,860 $61,970 - $104,410
Washington $48.88 $8,470 $101,670 $77,460 - $131,230
West Virginia $34.73 $6,020 $72,230 $47,640 - $96,470
Wisconsin $38.94 $6,750 $81,000 $65,110 - $100,820
Wyoming $38.95 $6,750 $81,010 $60,910 - $102,010
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


Registered Nurse City Wise Salary


Within each state, the city where you work also plays an important part in determining your salary. As an example, in the state of California, you will earn much more working in a hospital located in Los Angeles or San Francisco than you would earn if you worked in a more rural part of the state.

City Hourly
Wage
Monthly
Salary
Annual
Salary
Annual
Salary Range
Akron, OH $37.27 $6,460 $77,520 $62,940 - $93,810
Albuquerque, NM $41.94 $7,270 $87,240 $69,280 - $106,300
Amarillo, TX $37.88 $6,570 $78,800 $60,750 - $99,360
Anaheim, CA $60.26 $10,450 $125,350 $83,890 - $165,810
Anchorage, AK $49.59 $8,600 $103,150 $80,960 - $125,760
Arlington, TX $42.24 $7,320 $87,850 $62,990 - $106,880
Atlanta, GA $43.40 $7,520 $90,270 $62,550 - $125,510
Aurora, CO $42.21 $7,320 $87,790 $66,310 - $107,280
Austin, TX $41.69 $7,230 $86,720 $62,570 - $103,900
Bakersfield, CA $56.81 $9,850 $118,170 $81,420 - $160,380
Baltimore, MD $43.03 $7,460 $89,510 $65,470 - $106,910
Baton Rouge, LA $35.71 $6,190 $74,270 $52,310 - $90,600
Birmingham, AL $33.79 $5,860 $70,290 $51,060 - $84,860
Boise, ID $39.06 $6,770 $81,240 $63,380 - $101,520
Boston, MA $51.44 $8,920 $106,980 $74,050 - $159,860
Buffalo, NY $41.55 $7,200 $86,420 $63,150 - $108,480
Charlotte, NC $38.24 $6,630 $79,530 $60,370 - $101,050
Chicago, IL $40.99 $7,110 $85,260 $64,710 - $105,560
Cincinnati, OH $38.82 $6,730 $80,740 $63,000 - $100,580
Cleveland, OH $38.95 $6,750 $81,020 $65,130 - $101,100
Colorado Springs, CO $39.78 $6,900 $82,750 $62,040 - $105,290
Columbus, GA $34.57 $5,990 $71,900 $53,290 - $82,640
Columbus, OH $38.80 $6,730 $80,700 $63,690 - $99,270
Corpus Christi, TX $37.04 $6,420 $77,050 $60,310 - $94,410
Dallas, TX $42.24 $7,320 $87,850 $62,990 - $106,880
Denver, CO $42.21 $7,320 $87,790 $66,310 - $107,280
Des Moines, IA $34.16 $5,920 $71,060 $59,690 - $81,650
Detroit, MI $39.42 $6,830 $82,000 $65,400 - $101,280
Durham, NC $39.53 $6,850 $82,230 $63,600 - $101,730
El Paso, TX $36.36 $6,300 $75,630 $58,050 - $94,460
Fayetteville, NC $38.30 $6,640 $79,670 $55,020 - $103,000
Fort Wayne, IN $35.21 $6,100 $73,240 $58,990 - $95,080
Fort Worth, TX $42.24 $7,320 $87,850 $62,990 - $106,880
Fresno, CA $59.31 $10,280 $123,370 $83,200 - $163,370
Greensboro, NC $38.59 $6,690 $80,260 $60,620 - $97,070
Henderson, NV $46.96 $8,140 $97,680 $76,050 - $130,200
Honolulu, HI $55.38 $9,600 $115,200 $76,890 - $137,710
Houston, TX $42.73 $7,410 $88,880 $63,100 - $106,780
Indianapolis, IN $38.68 $6,700 $80,450 $55,080 - $102,540
Jacksonville, FL $37.74 $6,540 $78,490 $61,980 - $98,910
Jersey City, NJ $50.41 $8,740 $104,860 $77,390 - $131,840
Kansas City, MO $36.82 $6,380 $76,580 $60,140 - $97,110
Laredo, TX $36.73 $6,370 $76,390 $52,320 - $90,280
Las Vegas, NV $46.96 $8,140 $97,680 $76,050 - $130,200
Lexington, KY $37.36 $6,480 $77,710 $61,210 - $96,140
Lincoln, NE $35.52 $6,160 $73,880 $60,780 - $84,870
Little Rock, AR $34.48 $5,980 $71,720 $52,070 - $91,000
Long Beach, CA $60.26 $10,450 $125,350 $83,890 - $165,810
Los Angeles, CA $60.26 $10,450 $125,350 $83,890 - $165,810
Louisville, KY $39.08 $6,770 $81,280 $61,690 - $100,530
Lubbock, TX $37.36 $6,480 $77,710 $61,430 - $105,090
Madison, WI $41.46 $7,190 $86,240 $72,280 - $99,560
Memphis, TN $35.80 $6,200 $74,450 $51,550 - $101,480
Mesa, AZ $42.03 $7,280 $87,410 $66,630 - $105,580
Miami, FL $39.33 $6,820 $81,810 $62,300 - $103,020
Milwaukee, WI $39.44 $6,840 $82,040 $65,740 - $104,360
Minneapolis, MN $44.32 $7,680 $92,190 $67,600 - $108,610
Modesto, CA $66.59 $11,540 $138,510 $95,320 - $177,390
Montgomery, AL $33.98 $5,890 $70,680 $49,200 - $92,000
Nashville, TN $37.13 $6,440 $77,240 $53,080 - $106,510
New Orleans, LA $38.18 $6,620 $79,420 $61,760 - $98,550
New York, NY $50.41 $8,740 $104,860 $77,390 - $131,840
Newark, NJ $50.41 $8,740 $104,860 $77,390 - $131,840
Norfolk, VA $38.20 $6,620 $79,450 $62,290 - $102,090
Oakland, CA $79.21 $13,730 $164,760 $106,760 - $216,250
Oklahoma City, OK $37.19 $6,450 $77,350 $60,850 - $96,560
Omaha, NE $36.18 $6,270 $75,250 $60,380 - $95,610
Orlando, FL $38.04 $6,590 $79,120 $62,620 - $100,120
Oxnard, CA $58.78 $10,190 $122,260 $83,970 - $161,860
Philadelphia, PA $42.23 $7,320 $87,830 $65,840 - $105,300
Phoenix, AZ $42.03 $7,280 $87,410 $66,630 - $105,580
Pittsburgh, PA $36.65 $6,350 $76,230 $60,720 - $96,790
Portland, OR $53.66 $9,300 $111,610 $84,490 - $134,800
Raleigh, NC $37.82 $6,560 $78,670 $61,000 - $98,220
Reno, NV $44.85 $7,770 $93,290 $69,660 - $125,240
Richmond, VA $39.75 $6,890 $82,670 $64,110 - $104,270
Riverside, CA $58.40 $10,120 $121,470 $82,070 - $162,150
Rochester, NY $40.33 $6,990 $83,880 $62,420 - $101,640
Sacramento, CA $69.82 $12,100 $145,230 $97,850 - $190,430
Saint Paul, MN $44.32 $7,680 $92,190 $67,600 - $108,610
San Antonio, TX $39.92 $6,920 $83,040 $59,710 - $104,110
San Bernardino, CA $58.40 $10,120 $121,470 $82,070 - $162,150
San Diego, CA $56.65 $9,820 $117,830 $63,570 - $162,830
San Francisco, CA $79.21 $13,730 $164,760 $106,760 - $216,250
San Jose, CA $76.94 $13,340 $160,020 $107,370 - $214,700
Scottsdale, AZ $42.03 $7,280 $87,410 $66,630 - $105,580
Seattle, WA $50.74 $8,800 $105,540 $80,770 - $132,970
Spokane, WA $47.16 $8,170 $98,090 $76,600 - $132,720
St. Louis, MO $36.14 $6,260 $75,170 $58,330 - $98,980
St. Petersburg, FL $38.42 $6,660 $79,920 $63,130 - $98,320
Stockton, CA $62.68 $10,860 $130,370 $95,250 - $166,240
Tacoma, WA $50.74 $8,800 $105,540 $80,770 - $132,970
Tampa, FL $38.42 $6,660 $79,920 $63,130 - $98,320
Toledo, OH $36.80 $6,380 $76,530 $62,990 - $94,270
Tucson, AZ $40.19 $6,970 $83,590 $65,060 - $101,900
Tulsa, OK $38.32 $6,640 $79,710 $52,000 - $104,740
Virginia Beach, VA $38.20 $6,620 $79,450 $62,290 - $102,090
Washington, DC $44.61 $7,730 $92,800 $66,260 - $119,400
Wichita, KS $33.08 $5,730 $68,800 $51,050 - $84,950
Winston–Salem, NC $38.57 $6,690 $80,230 $64,580 - $100,810
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


RN Income Compared to Other Nursing Careers


An RN is essentially one of the most well-rounded careers in the entire healthcare industry. You will perform a number of duties including patient medical care, administrative details, surgical assisting, and much, much more. This means that RNs tend to earn more than many other healthcare professionals within the same industry, including nursing assistants (certified and non-certified), LPNs or LVNs, and postsecondary nursing instructors or teachers.

Of course, there are some nursing careers that pay more than a career as a registered nurse, as well. These include options such as nurse anesthetist, nurse midwife, and nurse practitioner, but it is important to consider that you must obtain at least a master’s degree in order to pursue any of these career paths. RNs earn some of the highest salaries at their education levels, which makes it an increasingly popular career choice for those who want to work in healthcare.

Occupation Hourly
Wage
Monthly
Salary
Annual
Salary
Annual
Salary Range
Nurse Anesthetist $98.93 $17,150 $205,770 $143,870 - > $239,200
Nurse Practitioner $59.94 $10,390 $124,680 $87,340 - $165,240
Nurse Midwife $58.87 $10,200 $122,450 $77,510 - $171,230
Registered Nurse $42.80 $7,420 $89,010 $61,250 - $129,400
Nursing Instructors and Teacher, Postsecondary $40.47 $7,020 $84,180 $47,760 - $127,290
Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurse $26.86 $4,660 $55,860 $40,490 - $72,650
Nursing Assistant $17.41 $3,020 $36,220 $28,030 - $45,940
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


RN Income Compared to Similar Healthcare Occupations


As a registered nurse, you can expect to earn a salary that is higher than most other similar healthcare occupations, as well. Pharmacists, physician assistants, physical therapists, radiation therapists, occupational therapists, and dental hygienists tend to earn more than RNs at the national level, but more locally, this can vary significantly depending on population and demand. For example, in highly populated areas, a registered nurse will tend to earn more than a dental hygienist.

You will earn more than sonographers, respiratory therapists, and surgical techs, among others. Part of this has to do with the amount of knowledge, skill, and sheer work ethic it takes to be successful as an RN. Though many of these occupations require the same level of education – a baccalaureate degree – these individuals work a fairly predictable schedule and perform a far narrower range of duties throughout their shifts.

Occupation Hourly
Wage
Monthly
Salary
Annual
Salary
Annual
Salary Range
Pharmacist $62.22 $10,780 $129,410 $79,950 - $164,230
Physician Assistant $60.23 $10,440 $125,270 $83,820 - $168,120
Radiation Therapist $47.28 $8,200 $98,340 $65,760 - $133,260
Physical Therapist $47.10 $8,160 $97,960 $67,910 - $128,830
Occupational Therapist $44.61 $7,730 $92,800 $63,320 - $123,870
Registered Nurse $42.80 $7,420 $89,010 $61,250 - $129,400
Dental Hygienist $40.80 $7,070 $84,860 $61,510 - $107,640
Diagnostic Medical Sonographer $40.58 $7,030 $84,410 $61,430 - $107,730
Respiratory Therapist $35.73 $6,190 $74,310 $51,970 - $100,520
Radiologic Technologist $33.77 $5,850 $70,240 $47,760 - $97,940
Dietitian and Nutritionist $33.34 $5,780 $69,350 $44,140 - $95,130
Cardiovascular Technologist and Technician $31.49 $5,460 $65,490 $33,950 - $102,000
Physical Therapist Assistant $31.01 $5,380 $64,510 $43,340 - $85,230
Social Worker $28.58 $4,950 $59,440 $36,600 - $87,300
Surgical Technologist $27.64 $4,790 $57,500 $38,860 - $78,560
Emergency Medical Technician and Paramedic $21.63 $3,750 $45,000 $29,220 - $64,110
Medical Assistant $19.57 $3,390 $40,700 $30,390 - $51,710
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


Employment Outlook of a Registered Nurse in the United States


How Much Has the Registered Nursing Industry Grown in The Last 5 Years (2018- 2022)?


Over the course of the last five years, the RN industry as a whole has grown by a staggering 5.71%, which indicates the increased need for registered nurses. There are numerous factors driving this growth now, and they are expected to continue driving significant growth in the future. The US population is continuing to grow, but even so, it is aging at the same time. Starting in 2011, baby boomers began to reach retirement age, which increased the number of people with access to Medicare and thus drove the demand for healthcare.

Year Number of Employees Growth % Growth
2018 2,951,960 45,120 1.55%
2019 2,982,280 30,320 1.03%
2020 2,986,500 4,220 0.14%
2021 3,047,530 61,030 2.04%
2022 3,072,700 25,170 0.83%
Overall Growth in Five Years 165,860 5.71%
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


How Much Will the Registered Nursing Industry Grow in The Next 5 Years (2023- 2027)?


Many of the same factors that drove RN industry growth over the last five years will continue to impact the industry in the future. Between 2023 and 2027, the industry is expected to grow by 3.76%, which is slightly slower than the previous five years. This is because the much baby boomer generation will have already reached retirement age and the number of people entering retirement will start to slow. Other factors expected to drive growth include expanded health coverage for more Americans, better medical technology, and a higher demand for preventative care.

Year Employment Growth % Growth
2023 3,092,240 19,540 0.64%
2024 3,113,890 21,650 0.70%
2025 3,136,930 23,040 0.74%
2026 3,161,710 24,780 0.79%
2027 3,188,270 26,560 0.84%
Overall Growth in Next Five Years 115,570 3.76%
(Source: In-House Research)


How Many Registered Nursing Jobs Are Being Created Annually?


Each year in the US, well over 200,000 job openings for RNs become available. Between 2023 and 2027, the US will need to add well over 25,000 new RN positions each year to keep up with demand. In 2023, it is expected that some 183,660 replacement RNs will be necessary, but by 2027, that number will jump to 190,680. In 2024, the total of new and replacement RN positions is expected to be 185,770, but in 2026, this number is expected to climb to 187,160 – a jump of roughly 3000 positions.

The growing population will require skilled healthcare, and employers are increasingly hiring RNs over LVNs and LPNs in order to provide better care to their patients. As nurses continue to retire out of the industry at a faster pace over the next few years, the need to fill existing positions will continue to grow as well. Finally, technological growth and better access to healthcare will lead to more people than ever seeking treatment, which will have a tremendous impact on this growth.

Year New Replacement Annual Job
Openings
(New + Replacement)
2023 19,540 183,660 203,200
2024 21,650 185,770 207,420
2025 23,040 187,160 210,200
2026 24,780 188,900 213,680
2027 26,560 190,680 217,240
(Source: In-House Research)


State Wise Registered Nurse Employment, 10 Year Growth Projection and Annual Job Openings


Growth projection by state is an important consideration since your overall job security could be impacted by the state in which you live. For the most part, the population of any given state is responsible for the overall outlook. As an example, California is expected to see the biggest increase in growth while Wyoming is expected to see the least.

State Employment Employment
Growth (2020-2030)
Annual
Job Openings
(New + Replacement)
2020 2030 Number %
Alabama 51,280 55,450 4,170 8.13% 3,180
Alaska 5,680 6,500 820 14.44% 400
Arizona 58,480 81,460 22,980 39.30% 5,930
Arkansas 25,890 28,240 2,350 9.08% 1,640
California 323,900 358,900 35,000 10.81% 21,200
Colorado 53,100 68,270 15,170 28.57% 4,430
Connecticut 34,470 35,830 1,360 3.95% 1,960
Delaware 11,660 13,350 1,690 14.49% 820
District of Columbia 10,580 11,150 570 5.39% 620
Florida 189,120 216,510 27,390 14.48% 13,250
Georgia 73,180 86,440 13,260 18.12% 5,460
Hawaii 11,770 12,800 1,030 8.75% 740
Idaho 15,350 18,400 3,050 19.87% 1,110
Illinois 136,640 142,890 6,250 4.57% 7,870
Indiana 66,740 71,950 5,210 7.81% 4,120
Iowa 33,110 37,070 3,960 11.96% 2,220
Kansas 30,920 33,190 2,270 7.34% 1,890
Kentucky 43,320 47,140 3,820 8.82% 2,730
Louisiana 41,940 42,690 750 1.79% 2,270
Maine 14,950 15,440 490 3.28% 840
Maryland 71,390 83,710 12,320 17.26% 5,250
Massachusetts 87,860 98,560 10,700 12.18% 5,900
Michigan 102,590 110,750 8,160 7.95% 6,350
Minnesota 71,780 76,540 4,760 6.63% 4,320
Mississippi 29,270 33,220 3,950 13.50% 2,010
Missouri 73,330 78,130 4,800 6.55% 4,410
Montana 10,680 11,810 1,130 10.58% 700
Nebraska 27,670 29,810 2,140 7.73% 1,700
Nevada 24,040 29,630 5,590 23.25% 1,950
New Hampshire 14,010 15,240 1,230 8.78% 880
New Jersey 83,660 90,850 7,190 8.59% 5,240
New Mexico 18,740 21,350 2,610 13.93% 1,300
New York 197,160 230,580 33,420 16.95% 14,430
North Carolina 102,150 113,920 11,770 11.52% 6,780
North Dakota 10,060 11,460 1,400 13.92% 700
Ohio 131,400 140,780 9,380 7.14% 7,990
Oklahoma 39,130 43,800 4,670 11.93% 2,620
Oregon 41,000 45,980 4,980 12.15% 2,580
Pennsylvania 147,280 160,380 13,100 8.89% 9,280
Rhode Island 12,680 13,340 660 5.21% 740
South Carolina 47,050 52,040 4,990 10.61% 3,070
South Dakota 13,440 15,050 1,610 11.98% 900
Tennessee 64,280 75,150 10,870 16.91% 4,700
Texas 220,980 258,720 37,740 17.08% 16,210
Utah 24,840 29,820 4,980 20.05% 1,920
Vermont 6,920 7,610 690 9.97% 450
Virginia 67,340 72,900 5,560 8.26% 4,190
Washington 61,560 71,550 9,990 16.23% 5,430
West Virginia 21,550 24,110 2,560 11.88% 1,440
Wisconsin 64,590 67,120 2,530 3.92% 3,670
(Source: Careeronestop.org)


What Are the Reasons Behind Strong Job Outlook for The Registered Nursing Industry?


The strong outlook in the registered nursing industry is being driven by a number of factors, and it is likely that this growth will continue well beyond the next decade. Take a look at some of the things that make registered nursing such a lucrative career choice:

Rapidly Aging Population: The baby boomer generation began to reach retirement age in 2011, and as a result, they also gained access to Medicare benefits. The combination of increased medical coverage and common medical conditions associated with aging have driven the demand for healthcare overall, and thus the demand for RNs. This trend is expected to continue for many more years to come.

Increasing Number of Individuals with Chronic Conditions Like Diabetes, Obesity, Arthritis and Dementia: As the population of the United States gets older collectively, there will also be an increase in the number of people with diseases and conditions that are common among the elderly including dementia, arthritis, Alzheimer’s disease, cancers, and more. Obesity and diabetes are also growing among the US population in people of all ages – including children – which puts further strain on the healthcare industry and increases demand for RNs.

Growing Number of Individuals with Access to Healthcare: Thanks to government initiatives to expand healthcare to more people and laws that require individuals to purchase health insurance, more people than ever before have coverage. As a result, more people are seeking preventative care and treatment, which drives the demand for healthcare professionals.

Acute Registered Nursing Shortage in Several States Across the Nation: Numerous states across the country are seeing a shortage in registered nurses and other healthcare professionals. States like California, Florida, and New York simply do not have enough new RNs to fill existing positions, and this is due in part to the booming population.

Increased Emphasis on Preventative Care: Physicians and health insurance providers alike have placed a tremendous focus on the need for individuals to seek preventative care. More people than ever are scheduling annual physicals and lab work for this reason, and as a result, RNs are in high demand across the nation.

Rising Demand for Home-Based Health Care: Insurance providers are beginning to increase their coverage of home-based health services, which means people are continuing to avoid nursing homes and rehabilitation centers in favor of remaining in their homes as they age or recover from illness or injury. Because RNs can see fewer patients in this setting, more professionals are required to provide the requested services.

High Number of Current Registered Nurses Reaching Retirement Age: The population as a whole continues to age, and RNs are not immune to this. Many of today’s RNs are either of retirement age or within a few years of reaching it, and this means that more younger RNs will be needed to take their place.


Which Industries Employ the Highest Number of RNs?


As an RN, you could work in a variety of different industries across the country. Some of these industries, such as private hospitals, require far more RNs collectively than others, including the insurance industry. If you want to enjoy excellent job security and a competitive pay rate, it is often best to seek employment in an industry where the demand is greater. Private hospitals, private doctors’ offices, home health care, government-owned hospitals, and nursing care facilities are the biggest employers of RNs.

These industries employ more RNs than others simply because they are responsible for more people. On any given day, far more people who require the services of an RN enter a private hospital, doctor’s office, or nursing home than other facilities, which is the driving force behind the high employment rates. These numbers will only continue to grow in the future, and as the nursing shortage continues, you can expect a competitive rate of pay and excellent job security within these industries, as well.

Rank Industry Employment
1 Private Hospitals 1,551,880
2 Offices of Physicians 208,760
3 Local Government Owned Hospitals 176,510
4 Home Health Care Services 173,640
5 Nursing Care Facilities 124,690
6 State Government Owned Hospitals 98,660
7 Federal Government 90,590
8 Temporary Help Services 86,600
9 Specialty Hospitals 63,460
10 Elementary and Secondary Schools 62,760
11 Continuing Care Retirement Communities and Assisted Living Facilities for The Elderly 31,230
12 Direct Health and Medical Insurance Carriers 27,650
13 Private Psychiatric and Substance Abuse Hospitals 23,450
14 Management of Companies and Enterprises 20,840
15 Services for The Elderly and Persons with Disabilities 19,170
16 Residential Mental Health and Substance Abuse Facilities 16,280
17 State Government Owned Colleges and Universities 15,320
18 State Government Owned Psychiatric and Substance Abuse Hospitals 14,940
19 All Other Ambulatory Health Care Services 13,920
20 Outpatient Mental Health and Substance Abuse Centers 11,030
21 Offices of All Other Health Practitioners 9,930
22 Office Administrative Services 7,450
23 Other Insurance Related Activities 7,310
24 Residential Intellectual and Developmental Disability Facilities 6,260
25 State Government Owned Specialty Hospitals 6,190
26 Privately Owned Elementary and Secondary Schools 5,840
27 Privately Owned Colleges and Universities 5,720
28 Offices of Physical, Occupational and Speech Therapists and Audiologists 5,110
29 Management, Scientific, And Technical Consulting Services 4,890
30 Ambulance Services 4,100
31 Medical and Diagnostic Laboratories 3,980
32 Research and Development in The Physical, Engineering, And Life Sciences 3,460
33 Local Government Owned Colleges and Universities 3,270
34 Other Residential Care Facilities 2,750
35 Pharmacies and Drug Stores 2,500
36 Offices of Dentists 2,150
37 Vocational Rehabilitation Services 1,520
38 Direct Insurance Carriers (Except Life, Health and Medical) 850
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


RN Job Outlook Compared to Other Nursing Careers


It can also be helpful to take a look at the overall outlook and job security expectations associated with various other nursing careers in order to make a better decision about your future. Between the years of 2021 and 2031, more registered nurse positions (195,400) will be added than any other nursing career, representing an overall growth of 6.24%. However, the nurse practitioner career outlook is slated to grow even more quickly. Between those same years, only 112,700 nurse practitioner positions are expected to be added, but this represents a growth of 45.68% over the number of NP positions in 2021. All healthcare and nursing careers will grow significantly, but RNs will continue to be in the highest demand.

Occupation Employment Employment
Growth (2021-2031)
Annual Job Openings
(New + Replacement)
2021 2031 Number %
Registered Nurse 3,130,600 3,326,000 195,400 6.24% 203,200
Nursing Assistant 1,343,700 1,406,400 62,700 4.67% 212,700
Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurse 657,200 698,500 41,300 6.28% 58,800
Nurse Practitioner 246,700 359,400 112,700 45.68% 26,800
Nursing Instructor and Teachers, Postsecondary 87,000 105,700 18,700 21.49% 9,900
Nurse Anesthetist 45,200 50,500 5,300 11.73% 2,900
Nurse Midwife 8,100 8,700 600 7.41% 500
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


RN Job Outlook Compared to Similar Healthcare Occupations


When comparing the RN job outlook with similar healthcare occupations that require much the same education, it is clear that more registered nurse job openings will be available than any other. The largest growth percentage will affect occupations such as physical therapist assistants, physician assistants, and medical assistants, but overall, these occupations will see only a fraction of the new job openings as RNs. By 2031, it is estimated that there will be some 3,326,000 RNs across the country compared to only 861,300 medical workers and 177,500 physician assistants.

Occupation Employment New Employment
Growth (2021-2031)
Annual Job Openings
(New + Replacement)
2021 2031 Number %
Registered Nurse 3,130,600 3,326,000 195,400 6.24% 203,200
Medical Assistant 743,500 861,300 117,800 15.84% 123,000
Social Worker 349,800 378,900 29,100 8.32% 36,600
Pharmacist 323,500 331,100 7,600 2.35% 13,600
Physical Therapist 238,800 279,200 40,400 16.92% 15,400
Radiologic Technologist 222,800 236,900 14,100 6.33% 13,800
Dental Hygienist 214,000 233,100 19,100 8.93% 16,300
Emergency Medical Technician and Paramedic 163,400 174,800 11,400 6.98% 13,900
Physician Assistant 139,100 177,500 38,400 27.61% 12,700
Respiratory Therapist 135,800 154,200 18,400 13.55% 9,400
Occupational Therapist 133,900 152,500 18,600 13.89% 10,100
Surgical Technologist 110,700 117,200 6,500 5.87% 8,300
Physical Therapist Assistant 96,500 122,100 25,600 26.53% 17,900
Diagnostic Medical Sonographer 82,300 94,400 12,100 14.70% 6,000
Dietitian and Nutritionist 74,700 79,700 5,000 6.69% 5,600
Cardiovascular Technologist and Technician 58,100 60,800 2,700 4.65% 4,100
Radiation Therapist 16,400 17,500 1,100 6.71% 800
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


18 Reasons Why Registered Nursing Is the Most Sought-After Occupation?


Career possibilities are virtually limitless, but as of 2023, more people than ever before are interested in a career as a registered nurse. There are many reasons for this, but the top 18 are listed below.

1. Make a Difference in People’s Lives: Registered nurses save lives every single day across the country, which means they have the potential to change more lives for the better than any other occupation.

2. Respect in the Community: Thanks to media coverage (including social media), more people than ever realize how hard RNs work to provide excellent care. This earns them a great deal of respect within their communities.

3. Multiple Career Paths: As an RN, your career choices are virtually limitless. You could specialize in a specific area of medicine, become a teacher or manager, or even go back to school to become a nurse practitioner, doctor, or surgeon.

4. Plenty of Job Openings: One of the biggest reasons to consider a career as an RN is job security. No matter where you live, there will always be a job opening, so you will never be out of work.

5. Competitive Salary: Among careers requiring associate’s or baccalaureate degrees, registered nursing is one of the highest paid.

6. Flexible Locations: If you receive your RN license in a state that is part of the Nursing Licensure Compact, you can work in 28 other states without having to go through the licensure process again.

7. Flexible Schedules: Though RNs do work long hours, many employers are quite flexible, and you can also help to ensure an ideal schedule by going to work for a private doctor’s office rather than a hospital or nursing home.

8. Paid Time Off: Though all employers are different, almost all RNs are eligible for paid time off after a certain period of time.

9. Insurance (Health, Life, Dental & Vision Insurance): RNs receive excellent benefits packages from their employers, and this typically includes everything from health, dental, and vision insurance to a substantial amount of life insurance.

10. Retirement Benefits: Most of today’s employers provide their RNs with 401(k) and other retirement savings plans or even pensions that are designed to provide a financial cushion when they reach retirement age.

11. Job Security: Factors like the aging population, the RN shortage, increased health insurance coverage, better medical technology, and increased awareness of the benefits of preventative care will drive demand for skilled nurses and boost your job security.

12. Opportunities to Earn Extra: Due to current staffing shortages, many of today’s RNs are given ample opportunity to work overtime and earn 1.5 times their hourly rate for anything over 40 hours. Some employers even offer bonuses for nurses who have incredible patient outcomes or who meet predetermined KPIs.

13. Tuition Reimbursement: Employers will often reimburse part or all of your tuition if you choose to further your education in healthcare in exchange for continuing to work for that employer for a set period of time.

14. Opportunities for Advancement: You could move your way up the career ladder in short order, moving from RN to head nurse, nurse manager, and various other positions. You can also earn certifications or go back to school to advance even further.

15. Job Satisfaction: The ability to work with people to help them feel better and heal is incredibly rewarding, and when this is combined with recognition in the community, respect, a competitive salary, benefits, and more, it makes the RN career path incredibly satisfying.

16. Nursing is a Vibrant Community: Numerous nursing support groups exist at the local level and online, which encourages RNs to come together and provide companionship, advice, and more.

17. Volunteer Work: RNs often have opportunities to travel to locations where their services are in desperate need, including to other parts of the US after natural disasters or to third-world countries in an effort to provide basic healthcare.

18. Keeps You Fit: In today’s world, where many people earn a living sitting behind a desk, this is not the case for an RN. You will be on your feet for eight or more hours each day, which will keep you fit without even thinking about it.


Our Final Take: Is Registered Nursing The Right Career Option For Me?


With all of the above information in mind, does it make sense to pursue a career as a registered nurse? When examining all of the factors, it becomes clear that it is one of the best professions to consider in the United States today. Of course, nursing is a very fulfilling and rewarding career choice in general, and it will give you the opportunity to meet new people, save many lives, and change even more lives. However, it is also important to think about the possibility of heartache and grief as not every patient you treat will get to experience a positive outcome.

In terms of the potential salary, the ability to earn well above average with nothing more than an associate degree is certainly appealing, though you should keep in mind that employers are starting to “phase out” hiring RNs without baccalaureate (BSN) degrees. Even still, the ability to earn a handsome salary with a four-year college education is highly appealing. You will also have access to some of the best benefits available in the country, including excellent health, vision, and dental coverage, significant life insurance benefits, 401(k) and other retirement plans, and much, much more.

In terms of job outlook, there is very little doubt that you would enjoy security in your position as a registered nurse. The demand will continue to increase in the future as more and more people seek medical care, but fewer people enter the nursing profession as a whole. This demand will make you quite the commodity, and employers will be willing to pay a premium for your excellent services.


Interesting Registered Nursing Related Statistics


What is the Educational Background of Current RN Workers?


Most RN workers in the United States today (52%) have a four-year BSN degree, and this trend is expected to continue well into the future. Another 29.90% have an ADN degree, and a total of 12% have graduate degrees. Keep in mind that many states across the nation are currently pushing for at least 80% of their RNs to have a BSN at minimum by the year 2020, so these numbers are expected to change.

Less Than High School DiplomaHigh School Diploma or EquivalentSome College, No DegreeAssociate's DegreeBachelor's DegreeMaster's DegreeDoctoral or Professional Degree
Percent 0.40%0.90%3.80%29.90%52.40%10.20%2.30%
Number 12,29127,654116,763918,7371,610,095313,41570,672
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


What Is the Average Age of a Registered Nurse?


Most registered nurses in today’s healthcare industry are between 25 and 34 years old. Only a very few RNs are 19 or younger, and a surprising 176,625 are 65 years old or older. These percentages are spread fairly evenly, but the number of new RNs entering the workforce is evident. Only a little over 5.06% of all the RNs in the workforce are 24 years old or younger, which indicates that fewer people who go to college immediately after high school are choosing the nursing profession.

Total, 16 years and over 16 to 19 years 20 to 24 years 25 to 34 years 35 to 44 years 45 to 54 years 55 to 64 years 65 years and over Average Age
3,072,7004,800155,507790,973742,017683,462518,356176,62543.1
100.00%0.16%5.06%25.74%24.15%22.24%16.87%5.75%
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


What Is the Ratio of Women to Men Workers in The Registered Nursing Industry?


Though the number of male registered nurses has increased significantly over the last couple decades, they make up only 14.34% of the RN population in the US. There are 2,632,060 female RNs, which equals 85.66% of the entire workforce. Comparatively, there are only 440,640 male RNs in the US today.

Female Registered NursesMale Registered Nurses
2,632,060440,640
85.66%14.34%


What Is the Ethnicity Mix of RN Workers?


More minorities than ever before continue to enter the healthcare industry, but they still represent only small fractions of the overall RN population. Hispanic RNs make up only 8.80% of the population, and Asian RNs make up 8.60%. Black and/or African American people represent 13.30% of the RNs in the US. Some 74.90% of all registered nurses in the country are white.

WhiteBlack or
African American
AsianHispanic or
Latino
Percent Employed74.90%13.30%8.60%8.80%
Number Employed2,301,452408,669264,252270,398
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


Will I Earn More or Less as an RN Compared to Other Occupations?


Compared to the average salary associated with all other occupations, your salary will be handsome. RNs earn about $13.03 more on the hour than the national average, which equals about $27,110 more per year. Again, the high demand for RNs across the country due to shortages, aging populations, and other factors is by far the biggest contributor to the above-average salary.

TypeRN SalaryAverage Salary of
All Occupations
How Much More
Does an RN Earn
Hourly Wage$42.79 $29.76 $13.03
Monthly Salary$7,420 $5,160 $2,260
Annual Salary$89,010 $61,900 $27,110
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


Why Pursuing a BSN is Worth it?


Though you can go to work as a licensed RN after 18 months to two years of school, it is worth your time and money to pursue a BSN. Not only are most of the lucrative and high-paying employers slowly phasing out hiring RNs with only associate degrees, but even today, RNs who have BSN degrees earn an average of $11,900 more than their ADN-holding counterparts. Over the course of the average 40-year career, that’s a difference of over a quarter million dollars.

AnnualHourlyMonthly
BSN Salary$92,560 $44.50 $7,710
ADN Salary$80,660 $38.78 $6,720
How Much More Does a BSN Earn$11,900 $5.72$990
(Source: In-House Research)


Why Do Male RN Workers Earn More Than Their Female Counterparts?


As a whole, male RNs earn $98,010 each year while women earn $86,900. There are a couple reasons why male RNs tend to earn more than their female counterparts at the national level, as well. Many people cite pay inequality as a contributing factor, and research suggests it, as well. Employers, on the other hand, claim that male nurses make their male patients feel more comfortable, particularly in certain specialties and for specific procedures. Because men are less likely to enter the field in the first place, employers must make the salary enticing in order to secure one (or more) male nurses for their facilities.

Women Annual EarningsMen Annual Earnings
$86,900$98,010