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10 Pros and Cons of Being a Radiology Nurse + Salary + Steps to Become


Written By: Jennifer Schlette MSN, RN

Are you considering a career as a radiology nurse? Well, before you decide if this is the career for you, you need to know what are the pros and cons of being a radiology nurse. Radiology nurses have one of the most interesting, challenging, and rewarding jobs in the medical field. They help patients through some of their most challenging times, and they get to see the results of their work firsthand. However, radiology nursing is not for everyone. It can be stressful and demanding, requiring a lot of knowledge and skill.

Below you will find the top 10 pros and cons of being a radiology nurse + salary + steps to become salary so you can decide if this is a career path you should walk down.


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What Does A Radiology Nurse Do?


So, I am sure the first question you have is, what does a radiology nurse do? Well, a radiology nurse is a registered nurse who works in the field of diagnostic imaging. This includes working with patients who are undergoing radiologic procedures such as x-rays, MRI, and CT scans to name a few. Other duties of a radiological nurse include:

1. You will review the pre-procedure documentation and assessment to identify patients with contraindications for image testing:

As a radiology nurse, you will review the pre-procedure documentation and assessment to identify patients with contraindications for image testing. You will need to have a clear understanding of the patient's medical history, medications, and allergies in order to assess the risk versus benefits of each procedure. For example, those with a shellfish allergy cannot receive IV contrast due to the risk of an allergic reaction.

2. You will review the procedure for imaging with the patient:

Reviewing the procedure for imaging with the patient includes going over what they can expect during the procedure, such as lying still on the table, certain positioning, and wearing a lead in certain places. You will also answer any questions they have about the procedure.

3. You will assess for any unexpected events during the test:

An essential duty of a radiology nurse is expecting the unexpected. You never know when a patient may have an adverse reaction to contrast material or develop an unexpected complication to sedation during their procedure. By always being prepared and keeping a close eye on your patients, you can help ensure that any unforeseen events are quickly identified and managed appropriately.

4. You will insert, access, and assess the patient’s vascular access if needed:

Obtaining vascular access to your patients is an essential part of your job as a radiology nurse. Assessing the patient's access site is also necessary to ensure that the patient tolerates the procedure well. Vascular access will be utilized for medications and emergencies.

5. You will insert foley catheters if needed:

Radiology nurses are trained to insert foley catheters if required. The radiology nurse will also monitor the patient for any complications related to the foley insertion.

6. You will position the patient for their imaging:

Positioning during a radiological procedure is an important duty of the radiology nurse. When positioning a patient for an imaging procedure, there are many factors, such as the type of imaging being performed and the specific body part being imaged. The radiology nurse must also be aware of the potential risks involved with certain positions and take measures to minimize these risks.

7. You will provide the patient and their family with discharge instructions:

As a radiology nurse, giving discharge instructions to patients and their families is an essential part of your job. It is vital to ensure that all instructions are clear and concise and that they understand what they need to do after leaving the healthcare institution.

8. You will respond to emergencies if they occur:

Emergencies can arise at any point during a radiology procedure. It is the responsibility of the radiology nurse to be prepared to handle these situations. In some cases, the emergency may be related to the procedure itself. For example, if a patient experiences a sudden drop in blood pressure, the radiology nurse will need to take quick action to stabilize the patient.

9. You will coordinate the care of the patient with other inpatient units:

As a radiology nurse, you will coordinate the patient's care with other inpatient units. It will be your responsibility to ensure that the schedule runs smoothly.

10. You will be responsible for monitoring and documentation during the procedure:

An important aspect of your job when you work as a nurse in radiology is monitoring the patient and completing proper documentation. You will want to be vigilant in your observations and take note of any changes in the patient's condition. Adequate documentation is essential in keeping track of the care that is provided and will be used should any questions or concerns arise later.


Where Does A Radiology Nurse Work?


As a radiology nurse, you can work in various settings. Where you work will depend on your own personal preference and where there is a job available.

1. Hospitals:

You will find radiology nurses working in the hospital setting. In the hospital setting, you will be working with various types of patients. You will see many patients who will need your help in getting X-rays, MRIs, and other types of tests. Let's just say you will never be bored.

2. Diagnostic imaging centers:

In a diagnostic imaging center, radiology nurses work alongside radiologists and other imaging professionals. Radiology nurses are an important part of the diagnostic imaging team. They play a vital role in patient care and comfort, as well as helping to ensure accuracy in image interpretation. By maintaining a high level of communication with patients and families, radiology nurses can help to ensure that the imaging process is as smooth and stress-free as possible.

3. Outpatient surgical centers:

You will also find radiology nurses in outpatient surgical centers. At outpatient surgical centers, minimally invasive procedures are performed. Because these procedures are minimally invasive, the need for radiology imaging is very important.

4. Outpatient clinics:

Many types of outpatient clinics will utilize the expertise of radiology nurses. Some of the types of clinics you can find a radiology nurse working in are orthopedic clinics, oncology clinics, or cardiology clinics.

5. Urgent care:

Urgent care is an excellent alternative to going to the hospital. This is why many urgent care facilities use the expertise of a radiology nurse. Having a radiology nurse on staff will enable these facilities to perform many different diagnostic studies that the patient would otherwise have to go to the hospital for.


What Is The Typical Work Schedule Of A Radiology Nurse?


When deciding if you want to become a radiology nurse, an important aspect to consider is the schedule you will be working. Typically, radiology nurses work Monday through Friday, with occasional weekends and holidays. The hours are generally during the daytime, although some facilities may offer evening or night shifts as well as weekend shifts. Call shifts may also be required in some cases but it is institution dependent.

The shifts that you will work as a radiology nurse will range anywhere from 8 to 12 hours, so it is important that you are able to commit to the required hours before applying for a position. Knowing your work schedule in advance will help you better plan your life and commitments outside of work.


What Are The Most Important Skills Required To Work As A Radiology Nurse?


1. Critical thinking:

One of the skills that you will need to be a radiology nurse is critical thinking. As a radiology nurse, you will use critical thinking to analyze images and patient data in order to provide the best possible care for your patients. Critical thinking is used in radiology to make decisions about patient care, develop new image interpretation methods, and solve problems that arise in the course of providing care.

2. Communication:

A radiology nurse is an intermediary between patients, their families, and medical staff members. They are able to update all parties on the patient’s progress in an effortful manner that maintains morale while ensuring all information is accurate for each individual person or family member's needs as they arise throughout treatment.

The more precise your spoken language and written comprehension skills are, they will help limit any transmission of misinformation that may lead to medical errors while also enhancing patient satisfaction levels.

3. Teamwork:

The ability to work effectively with others is essential in the field of radiology. Radiology nurses need to be able to communicate clearly, listen carefully, and be able to compromise when necessary. This is extremely important because, as a radiology nurse, you will always be working on a team with different types of health professionals.

4. Strong assessment skills:

As a radiology nurse, you will need to have strong assessment skills. This means being able to quickly and accurately assess a patient's condition. At any time during your patient's procedure, an issue can arise. It is your job to be able to identify these issues and take appropriate action. For example, your patient may have a reaction to the contrast. It is your job to recognize this and provide treatment.

5. Flexible:

As a radiology nurse, you will need to be flexible. Every day will not run according to schedule. You may have patients who are late, or you may have a patient that is difficult to position. If you work with children, you may have times when it is challenging to keep them still for a procedure. Whatever the situation, you will need to be able to adapt and be flexible.

6. Organized:

Radiology nurses need to be able to juggle a lot of tasks and information at once. You will need to keep track of patients’ schedules, their medical histories, and any changes in their condition. You will need to stay up-to-date and aware of all that goes on so you can provide the best possible care for your patients. This means having excellent organizational skills.


How Much Does A Radiology Nurse Make?


When deciding on becoming a radiology nurse, one of the most important factors to consider is your income. But just how much does a radiology nurse make? The average radiology nurse's salary is $88,000 a year. This is $7,330 a month or $42.31 an hour.

A radiology nurse just starting out in the field can expect an hourly salary of $28.24, which is a monthly income of $4,900. This means you will be earning $58,740 a year. Once you have gained a bit more experience, one to four years, your salary will increase. At this point in your career, you will be earning an hourly wage of $32.59, which is $5,650. This is an annual salary of $67,780 a year.

A radiology nurse with anywhere from five to nine years of experience will be earning an annual salary of $82,850. This yearly salary will break down to $6,900 a month or $39.83 an hour.

After ten to nineteen years of experience, your hourly wage will increase to $49.39 an hour. This means that your monthly salary will be $8,580, and your yearly salary will be $102,840. Now, a radiology nurse with twenty or more years of experience will make a six-figure salary. You could be earning $61.46 an hour, which is $10,650 a month. This will work out to $127,840 a year.

Level of Experience HourlyMonthlyAnnual
Entry-Level $28.24$4,900$58,740
1-4 Years of Experience $32.59$5,650$67,780
5-9 Years of Experience $39.83$6,900$82,850
10-19 Years of Experience $49.49$8,580$102,940
20 Years or More Experience $61.46$10,650$127,840
Average Salary$42.31$7,330$88,000


Is There A Demand For Radiology Nurses?


Having a career that is in demand is an important aspect to consider when deciding if you want to venture down this career path. The good news for you is that the career of a radiology nurse is a career that is in demand. There are a few reasons for this demand.

One of the main reasons there is a demand for radiology nurses is due to the aging population. This population is more likely to need medical imaging tests, which means that there will be an increased need for your skillset and knowledge.

Another reason for the demand is that as technology advances, there are new and improved ways to diagnose and treat patients. This advancement in technology means that the radiology nurse’s scope of practice is constantly expanding, which in turn creates a greater demand for these nurses.

Lastly, the advancement of minimally invasive procedures has increased the number of outpatient procedures being performed. This means that there is a need for radiology nurses who are able to provide care for these patients.


What Is The Step By Step Process To Become A Radiology Nurse?


1. The first step toward becoming a Radiology Nurse is earning your Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree (BSN) from an accredited institution. Earning this degree will provide you with the foundational knowledge as well as prepare you for your role as a radiology nurse. In addition, many employers prefer candidates who have earned bachelor's degrees over those without due to the advanced education they receive.

2. Next, you will need to pass the National Certification Licensure Exam (NCLEX-RN).

3. Once you have passed the NCLEX-RN, you can then apply for a license through the state board of nursing of the state you plan to practice in.

4. You must then gain experience as a radiology nurse, especially if you plan on earning your certification.

5. Finally, you can pursue your certification as a radiology nurse (CRN). To pursue CRN certification, you must meet the eligibility requirements established by Radiologic Nursing Certification Board (RNCB) before you can qualify to sit for the CRN exam. The criteria that you must meet in order to be eligible to sit for this exam are a current, unencumbered RN license in good standing, at least 2,000 hours of experience practicing as a registered nurse within the three years prior to applying for certification, and 30 hours of continuing education in Radiology.



TOP CONS OF BEING A RADIOLOGY NURSE


(The following are the top 10 disadvantages of being a Radiology Nurse.)

1. You can be exposed to radiation.

One of the cons of being a radiology nurse is that you will be exposed to radiation. This is something that you should keep in mind if you are considering this career path. While the risk of developing cancer from this exposure is low, it is still a possibility that you should be aware of. If you are worried about your health and safety, this may not be the right fit for you.

2. You can get a needle stick.

As a radiology nurse, one of your duties will be to start IVs and access port catheters. You will also be responsible for drawing blood. All of these tasks require you to use needles. Unfortunately, this means that you will be at risk for needle sticks.

Needle sticks are a severe hazard for healthcare workers. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), needlestick injuries can expose you to bloodborne pathogens, including HIV, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C.

3. You may have to manage emergencies on your own

One of the biggest disadvantages of being a radiology nurse is that if an emergency arises, such as a cardiac arrest, you will have to manage this patient on your own until the code team arrives. This can be extremely stressful as you will be responsible for this patient's life.

4. Your own health may not allow you to work in radiology.

If you have certain health conditions, you will not be able to work in MRI. This includes having a pacemaker, implanted defibrillator, or an insulin pump. This is because the magnetic field created by the MRI machine can interact with pacemakers, defibrillators and insulin pumps, causing them to malfunction. So, if you are a radiology nurse and you have a pacemaker or an insulin pump, you will need to find another line of work.

5. You will have to move patients.

Another one of the cons of being a radiology nurse is having to move and position heavy and sedated patients. This can be a difficult and physically demanding task, especially for those who are not used to lifting heavy objects on a regular basis. Lifting and positioning heavy patients can lead to injury if not done properly.

6. You will have long hours on your feet.

As a radiology nurse, the majority of the time you are working, you are on your feet. This can be tiring and draining after a long day, not to mention the potential for foot and leg pain. So, if you can not stand on your feet for a majority of the day, well, then this may not be your field of nursing.

7. You may need to have an intensive care background.

One of the disadvantages of being a radiology nurse is that certain institutions may require that you have a background in intensive care nursing before being hired. If you want to become a radiology nurse, this could be a problem.

8. You will have to keep up to date with different certifications.

As a radiology nurse, you may be required to have multiple certifications. You will need to be up to date with your CRN certification as well as all of your American heart certifications, such as ACLS, PALS, and BLS, to name a few. In order to keep your certifications active, you will need to take courses and renew them every two years. You will also need to maintain a certain amount of CEUs (continuing education units) each year. This can be exhausting.

9. Sometimes your schedule may run behind.

Sometimes in the world of radiology, the schedule for the day may run behind. This will impact you. As the radiology nurse, you may have to leave later than planned. And yes, you will likely deal with some angry patients.

10. You will have to wear a heavy lead apron.

Another top con of being a radiology nurse is that you will have to wear a heavy lead apron. This can be highly uncomfortable, especially during lengthy procedures. In addition, the lead can make it difficult to breathe and can cause you to sweat.



TOP PROS OF BEING A RADIOLOGY NURSE


(The following are the top 10 advantages of being a Radiology Nurse.)

1. You will earn an excellent salary.

One of the top pros of being a radiology nurse is that you can earn an excellent salary. Radiology nurses make, on average, $42.31per hour, or $88,000 per year. That's almost double the median hourly wage for all occupations in the United States!

Earning an excellent salary will allow you to live a comfortable life and provide you with financial security. It also means that you can pursue other interests outside of work without having to worry about money. Suppose you are looking for a career that will allow you to live comfortably. In that case, radiology nursing is a great option!

2. You will always have a job.

Another one of the top pros of being a radiology nurse is that you will always have a job. The radiology field is growing at a rapid pace, and there is a high demand for nurses. This means that you will never have to worry about finding a job or being unemployed. You can always find work in the radiology field, no matter where you live or what the economy is like.

3. There are a variety of settings you can work in

As a radiology nurse, you can work in various settings. You might work in a hospital, an outpatient center, or even clinical practice. So, if one location does not fit you, try another!

4. There are a variety of specialties to work in

One of the pros of being a radiology nurse is that you can specialize in different areas. For example, you could choose to specialize in mammography, which would involve working with breast cancer patients. Alternatively, you could choose to specialize in MRI, which would include working with patients who have a variety of medical conditions. There are many other specialty areas that you could choose from, so you can find an area that interests you and that you are good at.

5. You can work the day shift right off the bat.

As a radiology nurse, you will get to work during the day. Radiology nurses usually do not work at night, on weekends, or on holidays. They have a regular daytime schedule. This is good news for people who like working regular hours and having weekends and holidays off!

6. You will not have to be on call.

Another advantage of being a radiology nurse is that you will not have to be on call. This means that you can have a more regular schedule and know when you will be working ahead of time. This can make it easier to plan your life outside of work and also helps with burnout.

7. Your day will always be different.

As a radiology nurse, no two days will be the same. You could be working in the Operating Room one day, and the next day you could be working in the Emergency Department. Your patients will all have different needs and different reasons they need imaging. You may also find that you are working in the CT scanner one day, and then the next, you are working in MRI. You certainly will not get bored.

8. You will have a great deal of autonomy.

As a radiology nurse, you will have a great deal of autonomy. Depending on what area of radiology you work in, the physicians may not even be on site. There will be nobody breathing down your neck while you work. You will have the independence to make decisions and act on them. This can be both exhilarating.

9. You will have room to grow.

One of the biggest advantages of being a radiology nurse is that you will have room to grow in this field. You can become a radiology nurse practitioner or even move into administration. You will not remain stagnant. There are plenty of opportunities to grow in this field. And that's a good thing because you will always learn new things and expand your horizons. So if you are looking for a career with room to grow, radiology nursing is a great choice.

10. You will only have one patient at a time.

As a radiology nurse, you will only have one patient at a time. This means that you can focus all of your attention on them and ensure that they are as comfortable as possible. You will not have to try to juggle multiple patients at a time as your colleagues who are floor nursing staff will.



BREAKING DOWN THE SALARY OF A RADIOLOGY NURSE


What Is The Starting Salary Of A Radiology Nurse?


The starting salary of a radiology nurse is $58,740 annually. This annual salary will have you earning an hourly wage of $28.24 or a weekly income of $1,130. This means that you will earn $4,900 monthly.

Hourly$28.24
Weekly $1,130
Monthly$4,900
Annual$58,740


What Is The Average Salary Of A Radiology Nurse?


The average radiology nurse salary is $88,000 a year. This annual salary will break down to a monthly income of $7,330 or $1,692 a week. You will be earning $42.31 an hour.

Hourly$42.31
Weekly $1,692
Monthly$7,330
Annual$88,000
(Source: Payscale.com)


What Is The Average Radiology Nurse Salary In Your State?


Although your duties will be the same regardless of the state you work in as a radiology nurse, your salary will not be as uniform. For example, as a radiology nurse in Alabama, you will be earning an average annual salary of $66,240. If you were to compare this salary to what you would be earning in California for the same position, I am sure you would be shocked. In California, you will be earning an average annual salary of $132,600. This annual earning is double what you would make in Alabama.

State Hourly Monthly Annual
Alabama $31.85 $5,520 $66,240
Alaska $50.38 $8,730 $104,780
Arizona $42.50 $7,370 $88,410
Arkansas $33.65 $5,830 $70,000
California $63.75 $11,050 $132,600
Colorado $41.17 $7,140 $85,640
Connecticut $44.87 $7,780 $93,320
Delaware $39.30 $6,810 $81,750
Florida $36.75 $6,370 $76,450
Georgia $37.81 $6,550 $78,650
Hawaii $55.43 $9,610 $115,300
Idaho $37.88 $6,570 $78,790
Illinois $39.43 $6,830 $82,010
Indiana $35.69 $6,190 $74,230
Iowa $33.09 $5,740 $68,820
Kansas $33.95 $5,880 $70,610
Kentucky $34.23 $5,930 $71,190
Louisiana $35.96 $6,230 $74,800
Maine $37.56 $6,510 $78,130
Maryland $43.14 $7,480 $89,740
Massachusetts $50.89 $8,820 $105,860
Michigan $39.12 $6,780 $81,370
Minnesota $42.81 $7,420 $89,040
Mississippi $32.39 $5,610 $67,370
Missouri $34.85 $6,040 $72,480
Montana $37.29 $6,460 $77,570
Nebraska $36.74 $6,370 $76,420
Nevada $47.46 $8,230 $98,710
New Hampshire $40.17 $6,960 $83,560
New Jersey $45.33 $7,860 $94,280
New Mexico $40.03 $6,940 $83,260
New York $47.46 $8,230 $98,720
North Carolina $36.46 $6,320 $75,840
North Dakota $36.82 $6,380 $76,580
Ohio $36.88 $6,390 $76,720
Oklahoma $35.22 $6,100 $73,250
Oregon $50.88 $8,820 $105,840
Pennsylvania $39.22 $6,800 $81,580
Rhode Island $43.78 $7,590 $91,060
South Carolina $35.50 $6,150 $73,840
South Dakota $32.24 $5,590 $67,050
Tennessee $33.90 $5,880 $70,520
Texas $40.61 $7,040 $84,470
Utah $37.21 $6,450 $77,400
Vermont $38.14 $6,610 $79,340
Virginia $39.33 $6,820 $81,810
Washington $48.28 $8,370 $100,430
West Virginia $34.44 $5,970 $71,630
Wisconsin $39.53 $6,850 $82,230
Wyoming $38.39 $6,650 $79,850



HIGHEST PAID RADIOLOGY NURSES IN THE NATION


What Are 10 Highest Paying States For Radiology Nurses?


So, I am sure learning that you can earn a different salary in each state has you wondering which states are the highest paying for radiology nurses. California is by far the highest paying state for a radiology nurse. Here you will be earning $132,600 a year. Hawaii will have you earning a great living as well, earning an annual salary of $115,300 a year. Massachusetts, Oregon, Alaska, and Washington will have you earning a salary in the $100,000 range. New York, Nevada, New Jersey, and Connecticut are not far behind, with radiology nurses earning a wage within the $90,000 range.

Rank State Average
Annual Salary
1 California $132,600
2 Hawaii $115,300
3 Massachusetts $105,860
4 Oregon $105,840
5 Alaska $104,780
6 Washington $100,430
7 New York $98,720
8 Nevada $98,710
9 New Jersey $94,280
10 Connecticut $93,320


What Are 10 Highest Paying Metros For Radiology Nurses?


As you know, California will have you earning the highest salary as a radiology nurse. Still, some metros within California will have you earning different amounts within this state. The highest paying metros for radiology nurses in California will have you earning well over the $100,000 mark. San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, CA, will have you earning $164,100 a year. That is a lot of money. Redding, CA is the lowest paying metro out of the top 10 highest paying metros for radiology nurses but is still not too shabby. Here you will be earning an annual salary of $123,030.

Rank Metro Average
Annual Salary
1 San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, CA $164,100
2 San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA $161,540
3 Vallejo-Fairfield, CA$156,330
4 Sacramento--Roseville--Arden-Arcade, CA $147,770
5 Salinas, CA $145,360
6 Santa Rosa, CA $137,310
7 Modesto, CA $133,180
8 Stockton-Lodi, CA $127,430
9 Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, CA $124,420
10 Redding, CA $123,030



Top Organizations And Associations For Radiology Nurses


The Association for Radiologic & Imaging Nursing: The Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing was founded in 1981 as a professional organization representing nurses who practice across all imaging disciplines. This organization is dedicated to being a premier source where you can connect with others like yourself and promote your work through a process of improvement efforts that will advance your understanding of how you can care best for your patients.

American College of Radiology: Founded in 1923, the American College of Radiology is a leader when it comes to innovation and quality care. The organization has more than 41000 diagnostic radiologists and other medical professionals such as radiation oncology physicians or physicists among their membership group, representing excellence across all fields related to radiological sciences. The mission statement for this prestigious college reads, "We empower our members through advocacy," meaning that they stand up for those who cannot speak out for themselves.

Radiologic Nursing Certification Board: This organization serves as the certification board for radiology nurses. Here you will find resources to help you prepare to become certified as a radiology nurse.


My Final Thoughts


Being a radiology nurse is definitely not for the faint of heart. As with any career path you may choose, there are pros and cons to being a radiology nurse. It takes a lot of hard work, long hours, and dedication to succeed in this field. But if you can handle the challenges, there are many rewarding aspects to this career as well.

The top 10 pros and cons of being a radiology nurse I presented in this article should help guide you in your career choices. Still, it is essential to remember that every individual's experience will be different. What matters most is finding a job that you love, and that makes you happy – and we think being a radiology nurse has the potential to do just that!


FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ANSWERED BY OUR EXPERT


1. Is Radiology Nursing A Good Career?

Yes, radiology nursing is a great career. Choosing to become a radiology nurse will not just have you earning a great living, it will also provide you with job stability and a great work-life balance.


2. On Average, How Much Does A Radiology Nurse Make Per Hour?

The average radiology nurse salary per hour is $42.31. This hourly salary will have you earning a pretty good living and will provide you with the means to support yourself.

$42.31


3. How Many Hours A Week Does A Radiology Nurse Work?

The number of hours a week you will be working as a radiology nurse will depend on the type of facility you work for and your position. Some radiology nurses will work a 40-hour-a-week work schedule, while others will work part-time. If you are part-time, you will be working around twenty hours a week.

Still, other radiology nurses may work per-diem. If you are per-diem, you may get to decide how many hours you work a week. The reason I say may is because some institutions have a minimum number of hours that their per-diems must work a month.


4. Is Being A Radiology Nurse Stressful?

Being a radiology nurse can be stressful at times. This stress may come from an unexpected emergency or a schedule that has been completely thrown off. You may have a critical patient that needs to get imaging. Stress can stem from multiple places in your job.


5. Do I Need To Be Certified To Work As A Radiology Nurse?

As a radiology nurse, you do not have to be certified, but it is strongly recommended. It will be challenging to find a job that will not require certification eventually.


6. What Certifications Are Required Or Recommended For A Radiology Nurse?

Certification that is recommended as a radiology nurse is the CRN. To pursue CRN certification, you must meet the eligibility requirements established by Radiologic Nursing Certification Board (RNCB).

The criteria that you must meet in order to be eligible to sit for this exam are a current, unencumbered RN license in good standing, at least 2,000 hours of experience practicing as a registered nurse within the three years prior to applying for certification, and 30 hours of continuing education in Radiology.

Other applicable certifications for radiology nurses include:

Basic Life Support (BLS)
Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS)
Neonatal Advanced Life Support (NALS)
Emergency Neurological Life Support (ENLS)
Advanced Radiology Life Support (ARLS):
Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support (ACLS)


7. How Long Does It Take To Become A Radiology Nurse?

It will cost you four years to earn your bachelor's degree in nursing. You will need to gain at least three years or two thousand hours of experience. All in all, to become a certified radiology nurse, you are looking at about seven years.


8. How Much Does It Cost To Become A Radiology Nurse?

To become a radiology nurse, you will have to be prepared to spend anywhere from $20,000 to $200,000 for your bachelor's of nursing education.


9. What Kind Of Career Advancement Opportunities Are There For Radiology Nurses?

As a radiology nurse, you do have the opportunity to advance your career. You could earn a master's degree in nursing and become either an administrator or a radiology nurse practitioner. You could also become a clinical nurse specialist in radiology.


10. What Are The 5 Most Common Radiology Nurse Interview Questions?

1. What do you feel your greatest weakness would be as a radiology nurse?
2. What do you think your greatest strength is as a radiology nurse?
3. What have you done to expand your knowledge of radiology nursing?
4. Are you certified as a radiology nurse?
5. Why should we hire you?



11. Who Makes More Money, Radiology Nurses Or Radiologists?

A radiologist by far makes more money than a radiology nurse. The annual salary for a radiology nurse is $88,000 a year. A radiologist makes 71.62% more than a radiology nurse. A radiologist earns $310,099 a year. That is a difference of $222,099.

Radiology Nurse
Average Annual Salary
Radiologist Average
Annual Salary
Difference
Number %
$88,000 $310,099 -$222,099 -71.62%


12. Is It Hard To Become A Radiology Nurse?

Yes, it can be hard to become a radiology nurse. You must be able to successfully pass nursing school, your licensure exam, and your certification.


13. Do You Need To Be Good At Math For Radiology Nursing?

A radiology nurse may be called upon at times to administer medication. This will require you to understand and compute math. So, the short answer is yes; you need to be good at math to ensure that your patients receive the correct number of medications.


14. Can A Radiology Nurse Become A Radiologist?

If you are already a radiology nurse, you can become a radiologist if you really want to. Nothing is stopping you. You will have to go through many years of school to accomplish this goal. The good news is that your experience as a radiology nurse may give you a leg up with your schoolwork.


15. What Is The Role Of The Radiology Nurse In Interventional Radiology?

The role of the radiology nurse in interventional radiology is that you will be assisting the physician with minimally invasive procedures and surgeries. You will still be responsible for the radiology nurse's other duties.


Jennifer Schlette MSN, RN
Jennifer Schlette is a registered nurse in pediatric critical care in New York City. She is the former Director of Undergraduate Nursing at a college located in New York. After obtaining her BSN from the College of Mount Saint Vincent, she went on to complete her MSN.