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10 Pros and Cons of Being a Nurse Attorney + Steps to Become + Salary


Written By: Jennifer Schlette MSN, RN

Being a nurse attorney is definitely a unique profession. Nurses are revered for their knowledge, compassion, and ability to make a difference in the lives of their patients. But what many people do not know is that nurses can be just as successful in the legal field. In fact, there are now nurse attorneys who specialize in several legal areas, including health care law, employment law, and family law. Keep in mind, that as with anything there are pros and cons that must be weighed. Do you know what are the pros and cons of being a nurse attorney?

If you are unsure about the pros and cons of this remarkable career, do not stress. Below you will find the top 10 pros and cons of being a nurse attorney. These pros and cons listed below will help you decide if this is the career for you.


What Does a Nurse Attorney Do?


So, the first question I am sure you have is, what does a nurse attorney do? That is definitely a valid question. A nurse attorney, first and foremost, is a nurse. A nurse attorney has gone to school and has received a degree in nursing. After they have worked as a nurse for a while and have gained clinical experience, they then attend law school and receive their law degree.

With this knowledge from both of their degrees, they are able to work with both lawyers and health care professionals. Their job is to help ensure that their clients, mostly healthcare professionals, provide the best possible care for their patients from a legal perspective. They do this by keeping up with the ever-changing laws and regulations that govern the healthcare industry. They also work with insurers and other health care providers to ensure that their clients get the coverage they need and deserve.

Nurse attorneys also work to educate other nurses about the legal aspects of their job. By doing this, they hope to prevent any legal issues from arising in the first place. However, if a problem does arise, they are there to help their clients through it.

Other duties of a nurse attorney are representing healthcare professionals in malpractice court, assisting in workman's compensation or work injury cases, participating in trials as expert witnesses, and educating healthcare providers on legal regulations. They also review medical records and report discrepancies, as well as help insurance companies resolve claims, and lobby for changes in policies or practices.


Where Does A Nurse Attorney Work?


You will find that a nurse attorney typically works in a law firm, in a hospital setting, or in a government agency such as the Department of Health. Other nurse attorneys choose to work in private practice.

Some nurse attorneys work in insurance companies or HMOs. These organizations are interested in preventing liability, and they retain nurse attorneys to assist in this goal. Other nurse attorneys work for pharmaceutical companies or medical device manufacturers. Here, the focus is on product liability and ensuring that the products are safe for use.

Nurse attorneys may also work for professional organizations such as the American Nurses Association or state nurses' associations. These organizations are interested in ensuring that nurses have the resources and support they need to practice safely and effectively.


What Are The Typical Working Hours Of A Nurse Attorney?


When becoming a nurse attorney, one of the essential things to consider is what your working hours will be like. It is crucial to have a good understanding of the typical working hours for this career so that you can make sure it is the right fit for you. Nurse attorneys typically work full time, and their hours can be quite long. They often work more than 40 hours per week and may even have to work weekends.

The exact amount and format of the hours you are working as a nurse attorney will depend on the type of setting you work in. Most jobs that you would typically work in will require that you dedicate at least Monday through Friday eight-hour days or longer to your job. If you work in private practice, you will have more flexibility. You may still have long days, but you will be able to work around any other commitments you may have.


What Are The Most Important Skills Required To Work As A Nurse Attorney?


When becoming a nurse attorney, it is essential to ensure that you have the right skills and experience to succeed. This role requires excellent communication. A nurse attorney must be able to communicate effectively with clients, witnesses, and other attorneys. They must be able to clearly explain legal concepts and cases to those who are not familiar with the law.

A nurse attorney must also be able to find and use relevant legal precedent to support their arguments. They must also be skilled at using legal research databases and other resources.

Critical thinking skills are also essential to possess. A nurse attorney must be able to analyze complex legal cases and identify the key issues. They must be able to think creatively to develop new arguments and strategies.

Being able to negotiate is also an essential skill for a nurse attorney. They often need to negotiate settlements on behalf of their clients. They must be able to persuasively argue for a fair settlement.

Interpersonal skills are also crucial for a nurse attorney. They must be able to build relationships with clients, witnesses, and other attorneys.


How Much Does A Nurse Attorney Make?


Now, let’s get to an important topic, salary. Your level of experience will be the driving force in determining your compensation. The average nurse attorney's salary is $83,534 a year. This is $54.77 hourly or $6,960 a month.

Now, I want to show you how your salary will be affected by your years in the profession.

An entry-level hourly wage will be $29.10 an hour or $5,040 a month. This is $60,520 a year.

A nurse attorney with anywhere from one year to four years of experience can expect a salary increase to $33.28 an hour or $5,770 a month. This will directly translate to you earning a yearly salary of $69,220.

Once you have been working a bit longer, anywhere from five to nine years, you can expect an annual salary of $81,470. You will be earning $39.17 an hour or $6,790 a month.

Once you have become seasoned in the profession, you can expect to earn a pretty nice living. If you have dedicated anywhere from ten to nineteen years to the job, you will earn an hourly wage of $45.68 or $7,920 a month. This is an annual income of 95,010.

Once you have reached the twenty-year mark, you will be earning a yearly wage of $113,920. This six-figured annual salary will translate to $54.77 an hour or $9,490 a month.

Level of Experience HourlyMonthlyAnnual
Entry-Level $29.10$5,040$60,520
1-4 Years of Experience $33.28$5,770$69,220
5-9 Years of Experience $39.17$6,790$81,470
10-19 Years of Experience $45.68$7,920$95,010
20 Years or More Experience $54.77$9,490$113,920
Average Salary$40.16$6,960$83,534


Is There A Demand For Nurse Attorneys?


The short answer to whether nurse attorneys are in high demand is yes. The need for nurse attorneys is likely to continue to grow as the healthcare industry becomes increasingly complex and regulated. Hospitals and insurance companies turn to nurse attorneys to help navigate the legal landscape. Their skills are in high demand. Nurse attorneys bring a unique perspective to the legal field. Their skills are in high need by both hospitals and insurance companies.

Nurse attorneys are in such high demand because they have a deep understanding of the healthcare system. They know how hospitals and insurance companies operate. They can provide valuable insights into the legal challenges these organizations face.

Another reason nurse attorneys are in high demand is because they have a deep understanding of the law. They know how to navigate the legal field. They can help hospitals and insurance companies resolve their legal challenges quickly and efficiently.

The third reason why nurse attorneys are in such high demand is because along with law they also deeply understand the nursing profession. They know how to advocate for their patients. They can help hospitals and insurance companies improve the quality of care they provide.


7 Steps To Becoming A Nurse Attorney


In order to become a nurse attorney, you will have to earn two separate degrees. The two degrees that you will have to earn are a degree in nursing and a law degree. Which degree is earned first is entirely your choice, but most people start with earning their nursing degree first, so that is where I will begin with the steps to becoming a nurse attorney.

1. First, you must earn a nursing degree. You can start out by earning your associate's degree in nursing, and then later go on to earn your bachelor’s degree in nursing, or you can earn your bachelor’s degree in nursing from the get-go. I recommend that you pursue a bachelor’s degree in nursing straight away because you will need a bachelor’s degree to be accepted into law school.

2. Once you earn your nursing degree, the next step would be successfully passing the National Certification Licensure Exam (NCLEX). To pass the NCLEX, you must be able to show that you can safely practice as a nurse. This exam tests minimum competency.

3. After you pass the NCLEX, you must apply for a license in the state you plan on practicing in. Once you are licensed, each state will have its own regulations on how often you need to renew your nursing license. Some states will also require that you show proof of a set number of continuing education credits in order to maintain your license.

4. You then need to start working in order to gain experience in the field of nursing. You should work for about two or more years to gain this valuable experience. Working will provide you with valuable knowledge about the healthcare system that will serve as an asset in your career as a nurse lawyer.

5. Before applying to law school, you will next need to take and pass the Law School Admission Council (LSAT). The LSAT will assess your ability in analytical reasoning, critical reading, persuasive writing, and logical reasoning.

6. Once you have passed the LSAT, you must earn a law degree. In order to be accepted into law school, you must have a passing score on the LSAT, a bachelor’s degree, letters of recommendation, and a personal statement or introductory essay.

7. After graduating from law school, you must then pass the BAR exam. This exam is necessary for lawyers to pass in order to become licensed in a particular state. The exam has two sections to it. The first section will test your knowledge of federal law and general principles. The second section will assess your understanding of content specific to the laws and practices of the individual state you intend to work in.

A different form of the BAR exam does exist. This is called the UBE or Uniform Bar Exam. The UBE is a bit like the nurse compact license. Those states that recognize the UBE have reciprocity when it comes to the licensure of lawyers.



TOP CONS OF BEING A NURSE ATTORNEY


(The following are the top 10 disadvantages of being a Nurse Attorney.)

1. You must eventually earn your bachelor’s degree in nursing.

One of the cons of being a nurse attorney is that you must eventually earn your bachelor’s degree in nursing. A bachelor's degree in nursing is necessary if you want to be able to continue down the path of this career. A bachelor's degree in nursing means that you will be spending the next four years in school. This can be a long and challenging process. You will have to put so much of your life on the back burner. You will have to miss out on a lot of life experiences.

2. You must also earn a law degree.

While a career as a nurse attorney may seem like the perfect way to combine your two passions, it is essential to remember that you will need to put in the work to make it happen. After completing your undergraduate degree in nursing, you will need to complete a Juris Doctor (JD) program at an accredited law school. Once again, you will be putting your life on the back burner. I would also like to mention that law school is not a cakewalk. You will be studying for long hours and taking difficult exams.

3. You will have to take two licensure exams.

One of the top cons of being a nurse attorney is that you will have to pass two different licensure exams. You will need to be successful on the NCLEX and the BAR. This can be a difficult feat for some individuals. If you are not successful on either exam, you will not be able to practice as a nurse attorney. This could be a massive disappointment for someone who has their heart set on this career.

You will also be responsible for maintaining these two licenses. This means keeping up with continuing education requirements and renewing both licenses on a timely basis. This can be costly and time-consuming.

4. I hope you have a secret money tree stashed away.

As a nurse attorney, you will have to pay for an enormous amount of schooling. A bachelor’s degree in nursing will cost you anywhere from $40,000 to $100,000. A law degree will cost you anywhere from $40,000 to $60,000 per year for tuition. This means that, in order to become a nurse attorney, you will need to be prepared to spend upwards of $200,000 on your education. And that is not even including the cost of living!

5. It is a long road to becoming a nurse attorney.

Another one of the cons of being a nurse attorney is that you will spend a reasonable amount of time in school. You will not only have to go through nursing school, but you will also have to obtain a law degree. This means that you will be in school for quite some time.

Earning a bachelor's degree in nursing will take about four years. Then, you will have to obtain a law degree, which will take an additional three years. Between these two degrees, you will need to gain some clinical experience. You should work at the bedside for at least two years prior to going to law school. All in all, you will invest about nine to ten years to become a nurse attorney.

6. You may have to work long hours.

As a nurse attorney, you will have to work long hours. You may be working 14 plus hours a day. This means you will be missing out on important events in your life, like your kid's soccer games or your best friend's wedding. You will have to be okay with sacrificing your personal time for your career.

7. You may be venturing into a high-stress job.

As a nurse attorney, you will also have a high-stress job with long hours, demanding clients, and high stakes. All of this stress can strain relationships with your family and friends. Stress can also take a toll on your body. Stress can lead to some pretty severe health problems like heart disease, high blood pressure, and stroke.

8. You may have to work with demanding clients.

One of the disadvantages of being a nurse attorney is that you may have to collaborate with some demanding clients. Some clients may be uncooperative, hostile, or even violent. You may also have to deal with clients who have mental health issues or who are addicted to drugs or alcohol. In addition, you may have to deal with clients who have been accused of crimes that they did not commit.

9. You will always be responsible for keeping up with law changes.

As a nurse attorney, you will always be responsible for keeping up with law changes. You will need to be aware of new laws as well as any changes in the law that may impact your clients. By staying up to date on the latest legal developments, you can ensure that you are providing the best possible representation to your clients. Keeping up with these changes will only add to your already hectic schedule, but it is essential for this line of work.

10. You will always be responsible for keeping up with medical advancements.

One of the biggest disadvantages of being a nurse attorney is that you will always be responsible for keeping up with medical advancements. This can be a difficult task, as new developments and breakthroughs are always happening in the medical field. Additionally, keeping up with medical advances can be costly, as you may need to attend conferences and seminars.



TOP PROS OF BEING A NURSE ATTORNEY


(The following are the top 10 advantages of being a Nurse Attorney.)

1. You will earn a great living.

One of the biggest advantages of being a nurse attorney is the salary you will earn. This is one of the most lucrative fields in nursing, and it is only going to grow in popularity. The average nurse attorney's salary is $83,534 a year.

As a nurse attorney, your salary will just grow with the amount of time that you are in the profession. Those who have been working as nurse attorneys for twenty or more years will be seeing a six-figure salary.

2. You will be able to support yourself and the finer things in life

As a nurse attorney, you will be able to support yourself financially. You will also be able to have the finer things in life that you may not have had access to as a nurse. For example, you may be able to purchase a home, a new car, or take luxurious vacations. As a nurse attorney, you will have the opportunity to live a life of luxury and ease.

3. You could work in private practice.

One of the top pros of being a nurse attorney is that you can work in private practice. In private practice, you will be able to set your own hours and have a greater level of control over your work/life balance. You will also have the opportunity to choose which cases you work on and build a caseload that is interesting and fulfilling to you. Another great perk of private practice is that you can typically charge higher hourly rates than you would be working for a law firm or in-house at a hospital.

4. You are looked at as an expert.

As a nurse attorney, you are looked at as an expert in the field of nursing. You have the ability to provide legal advice and guidance to nurses in all aspects of their practice. You also have the knowledge and experience to represent nurses in court proceedings. As a nurse attorney, you are an invaluable resource to the nursing profession.

5. You could work in various environments.

Having the ability to work in various environments is one of the pros of being a nurse attorney. You can work in a law firm, hospital, private practice, or even in a government agency. There are many different types of environments that you can work in to find the one that suits your needs the best.

6. You will be helping others.

As a nurse attorney, you will be helping others. You will also be making a difference in the world. You will be able to use your knowledge and skills to make a difference in the lives of others. You will be able to work with people of all ages and from all walks of life. You will be able to help them with their legal problems and give them the best possible chance at a successful outcome.

7. You can specialize in a particular area of nursing.

As a nurse attorney, you can specialize in certain areas of nursing to make yourself more marketable. For example, you can become a labor and delivery nurse attorney or a pediatric nurse attorney. By specializing in a specific area of nursing, you can make yourself more attractive to potential employers and clients. Additionally, you will be able to better understand the legal issues that are relevant to your area of specialization.

8. You can practice a specific type of law.

Another one of the pros of being a nurse attorney is that you can specialize in a particular type of law. Suppose you are interested in medical malpractice, for example, in that case, you can focus your career on this area and become an expert in it. This can be a great way to make a difference in the lives of patients and families who have been harmed by negligent medical care. There are many other areas of law that you can specialize in as a nurse attorney, so if you have a passion for a particular area of the law, this may be the career path for you.

9. You will be seen as an extremely valuable part of the team

As a nurse attorney, you will be seen as a very valuable part of the team. Your knowledge of the law and your ability to navigate the legal system will be an asset to any organization. You will be able to work with clients and healthcare workers to ensure that their rights are protected.

Additionally, you will be able to provide expert testimony in court cases involving medical issues. Your work will make a difference in the lives of those you work with and the communities you serve.

10. You have a career that you can be proud of.

As a nurse attorney, you will have a career that you can be proud of. One of the advantages of being a nurse attorney is that you have accomplished a feat that not everyone can accomplish. You have the credentials of a lawyer and the knowledge of a nurse. This gives you a unique perspective when it comes to handling cases.

You have worked incredibly hard and have proven that you have the dedication and determination to be a nurse attorney. This is a career that will provide you with years of fulfillment and success.



BREAKING DOWN THE SALARY OF A NURSE ATTORNEY


What Is The Starting Salary Of A Nurse Attorney?


The starting salary of a nurse attorney is $60,520 a year. That will break down to an hourly wage of $29.10 or a weekly income of $1,164. That means monthly, you will be earning $5,040.

Hourly$29.10
Weekly $1,164
Monthly$5,040
Annual$60,520


What Is The Average Salary Of A Nurse Attorney?


The average nurse attorney's salary is $83,534 a year. When you take a close look at this figure, the average nurse attorney salary per hour is $40.16. This is a weekly earning of $1,606 or a monthly income of $6,960.

Hourly$40.16
Weekly $1,606
Monthly$6,960
Annual$83,534
(Source: Ziprecruiter.com)


Nurse Attorney Salary By State


Each state will have a different salary that you can be earning as a nurse attorney. In Tennessee, you will be earning an annual salary of $72,490. That is not an insufficient yearly salary. Now, let’s take a look at what you would be earning in California. In California, you will be earning an annual wage of $106,480. That is a difference of $33,990 for doing the same job.

State Hourly Monthly Annual
Alabama $35.00 $6,070 $72,800
Alaska $38.67 $6,700 $80,440
Arizona $41.20 $7,140 $85,700
Arkansas $37.25 $6,460 $77,480
California $51.19 $8,870 $106,480
Colorado $38.50 $6,670 $80,070
Connecticut $40.96 $7,100 $85,190
Delaware $39.36 $6,820 $81,870
Florida $35.44 $6,140 $73,720
Georgia $37.25 $6,460 $77,490
Hawaii $41.66 $7,220 $86,650
Idaho $39.94 $6,920 $83,080
Illinois $39.30 $6,810 $81,750
Indiana $38.56 $6,680 $80,200
Iowa $37.85 $6,560 $78,720
Kansas $36.66 $6,350 $76,250
Kentucky $35.93 $6,230 $74,740
Louisiana $39.24 $6,800 $81,620
Maine $39.13 $6,780 $81,400
Maryland $40.42 $7,010 $84,070
Massachusetts $44.21 $7,660 $91,950
Michigan $38.28 $6,640 $79,620
Minnesota $41.70 $7,230 $86,740
Mississippi $38.42 $6,660 $79,920
Missouri $37.48 $6,500 $77,960
Montana $40.11 $6,950 $83,430
Nebraska $37.64 $6,530 $78,300
Nevada $42.05 $7,290 $87,460
New Hampshire $39.44 $6,840 $82,040
New Jersey $45.90 $7,960 $95,480
New Mexico $41.05 $7,120 $85,390
New York $44.35 $7,690 $92,240
North Carolina $38.00 $6,590 $79,050
North Dakota $38.95 $6,750 $81,020
Ohio $37.05 $6,420 $77,060
Oklahoma $39.54 $6,850 $82,250
Oregon $41.60 $7,210 $86,520
Pennsylvania $39.13 $6,780 $81,380
Rhode Island $41.14 $7,130 $85,570
South Carolina $35.49 $6,150 $73,820
South Dakota $36.15 $6,270 $75,200
Tennessee $34.85 $6,040 $72,490
Texas $40.93 $7,090 $85,130
Utah $39.82 $6,900 $82,830
Vermont $37.98 $6,580 $78,990
Virginia $38.46 $6,670 $80,000
Washington $44.36 $7,690 $92,270
West Virginia $36.90 $6,400 $76,760
Wisconsin $39.64 $6,870 $82,450
Wyoming $41.67 $7,220 $86,670



HIGHEST PAID NURSE ATTORNEYS


What Are The 10 Highest Paying States For Nurse Attorneys?


Out of all the states in the United States, certain states stand out as the highest paying states for nurse attorneys. California is the highest paying state for nurse attorneys. In California, you can expect to be earning an annual salary of $106,480. New Jersey, Washington, New York, and Massachusetts will have you earning a yearly salary in the low to mid $90,000 range. States where you would be earning mid to high $80,000 a year range include Nevada, Minnesota, Wyoming, Hawaii, and Oregon.

Rank State Average
Annual Salary
1 California $106,480
2 New Jersey $95,480
3 Washington $92,270
4 New York $92,240
5 Massachusetts $91,950
6 Nevada $87,460
7 Minnesota $86,740
8 Wyoming $86,670
9 Hawaii $86,650
10 Oregon $86,520


What Are The 10 Highest Paying Metros For Nurse Attorneys?


So, even though a state may be the highest paying state for nurse attorneys, not every metro within a state will have you earning the same dollar amount. The highest paying metros for nurse attorneys are primarily in California. Vallejo-Fairfield, CA, is the highest-paid metro at $137,200 a year. That is a fantastic salary. Yuba City, CA is the lowest paying metro out of the top 10, with you earning $106,320. Still, that is an excellent salary.

Now, not all the 10 highest paying metros for nurse attorneys are in California. Massachusetts made it to the top ten. New Bedford, MA, is actually the 7th highest paying metro for nurses’ attorneys. Here you could earn $107,610 a year.

Rank Metro Average
Annual Salary
1 Vallejo-Fairfield, CA $137,200
2 San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, CA $129,700
3 Salinas, CA $113,300
4 San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA $111,790
5 Napa, CA $111,350
6 Sacramento--Roseville--Arden-Arcade, CA $108,070
7 New Bedford, MA $107,610
8 Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, CA $106,520
9 Santa Maria-Santa Barbara, CA $106,320
10 Yuba City, CA $105,830


Top Organizations And Associations For Nurse Attorneys


The American Association of Nurse Attorneys: This organization for nurse attorneys is a phenomenal resource for those who wish to become a nurse attorney and for those who already are. Here you will find a great deal of information regarding how to obtain the goal of being a nurse attorney. You will also find a ton of continuing education information for those who are already nurse attorneys, such as conferences.

You can also find a nurse attorney if you need one on this site. You can search for a nurse attorney either based on their specialty or the state they practice in. If you are a nurse attorney looking for employment, this organization will post jobs on their site. This organization is a one-stop shop for all your nurse attorney's needs and wants.


My Final Thoughts


So, what do you think? Are the pros worth the cons of being a nurse attorney? You have just read the pros and cons of being a nurse attorney, and if you are feeling brave enough to take on this unique career path, we wish you all the best. Just be sure to keep these top 10 pros and cons of being a nurse attorney in mind so that you can make the most informed decision possible. And if you decide that law is not really for you, do not worry – there are plenty of other great careers out there for nurses. Thanks for reading!


FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ANSWERED BY OUR EXPERT


1. Is Nursing Attorney A Good Career?

Yes, being a nurse attorney is a great career. Not only are you in demand, but you will be earning a fantastic salary that only increases with time. You will be like a fine wine. Time will make you better and more costly.


2. On Average, How Much Does A Nurse Attorney Make Per Hour?

The average nurse attorney salary per hour is $40.16. This means that you will be making a pretty good living. You will be able to afford all you need.

$40.16


3. How Many Hours Does A Nurse Attorney Work?

As a nurse attorney, you will not have a set number of hours that your will be working; it will all depend on the nature of your work. Some nurse attorneys will have an eight-hour day, whereas others may be working well into the late-night hours to get their work done.


4. Is Being A Nurse Attorney Stressful?

Being a nurse attorney can be stressful at times. The stress can come from various sources. Some examples of stressors may be completing all your work by a deadline. Another stressor you may encounter as a nurse attorney is finding time to balance your family and social life and your work life. Your job will be demanding at times.


5. Do I Need To Be Certified To Work As A Nurse Attorney?

Certification is not required to be a nurse attorney. You do, however, need to possess a license in both nursing and law.


6. What Certifications Are Required Or Recommended For A Nurse Attorney?

As previously stated, certification as a nurse attorney is not required. You can, however, obtain specialty certification in particular areas to help with your practice as a nurse attorney. Some examples of this would be wound care certification, which would help in many aspects of your legal career. Another example would become certified in gerontology. Being certified in gerontology may help you with specific issues with the aging population, such as advanced directives.


7. How Long Does It Take To Become A Nurse Attorney?

It will take you four years to complete a bachelor’s degree in nursing and an additional three years to complete your law degree. Do not forget you will also have to gain some clinical nursing experience. So, you are looking at investing about seven to 10 years of your life to become a nurse attorney.


8. How Much Does It Cost To Become A Nurse Attorney?

A bachelor’s degree in nursing will cost you anywhere from $40,000 to $100,000. Then you will need to earn your law degree, which will cost you anywhere from $40,000 to $60,000 per year for tuition. So, overall you will be spending about $160,000 to $280,000 to become a nurse attorney.


9. What Kind Of Career Advancement Opportunities Are There For Nurse Attorneys?

As a nurse attorney, you can obtain career advancement by branching out into different specialties and multiple areas of law. Being fluent in many different avenues will make you more marketable and a better nurse attorney.


10. Can I Apply To Law School With A Nursing Degree?

Yes, you can apply to law school with a nursing degree. You simply better be sure that you are applying with a bachelor’s degree in nursing.


Jennifer Schlette MSN, RN
Jennifer Schlette is a registered nurse in pediatric critical care in New York City. She is the former Director of Undergraduate Nursing at a college located in New York. After obtaining her BSN from the College of Mount Saint Vincent, she went on to complete her MSN.