FIND NP PROGRAMS
Nursingprocess.org is an advertising-supported site. Clicking in this box will show you programs related to your search from schools that compensate us. This compensation does not influence our school rankings, resource guides, or other information published on this site.

10 Pros and Cons of Being a Navy Nurse + Salary + Steps to Become


Written By: Jennifer Schlette MSN, RN

If you are looking for an interesting and exciting career, becoming a Navy nurse may be just what you are looking for. You will also have the opportunity to travel and see the world. There are many pros to this job, but it is not without its drawbacks. On the downside, being a nurse in the Navy can be highly challenging and stressful at times. It can also be difficult to maintain a work-life balance.

In this article, we will cover what are the pros and cons of being a Navy nurse, how much does a Navy nurse earn, and what steps do you need to take to become one. The top 10 pros and cons of being a navy nurse + salary + steps to become one will surely help you decide if this is a career path worth traveling down.


RECOMMENDED ONLINE MSN PROGRAMS

What Exactly Is A Navy Nurse?


Navy nurses are an essential part of the United States Navy Medical Corps. Navy nurses are registered nurses who care for sailors, marines, and their families. As a Navy nurse, you will be trained in various medical disciplines, including emergency medicine, pediatrics, and surgery. You will also receive training in counseling and psychology, which will allow you to support sailors and marines dealing with stress and trauma.


What Does A Navy Nurse Do?


So, I am sure you are wondering, what does a navy nurse do? Well, let me tell you! Navy nurses provide care for sailors, marines, and their families. Navy nurses are responsible for the health and well-being of these patients. Below you will find the duties of a navy nurse.

1. Provide care to service members:

As a Navy nurse, you will be providing care to service members. You could be working in a hospital, aboard a ship, or even in a clinic. No matter where you are stationed, you will be an important part of the Navy team. Navy nurses have been providing care to service members for many years. In times of war and peace, Navy nurses have always been there to provide the best possible care because of the high standards they set.

2. Provide care to service members' families:

As a Navy nurse, you will also be providing care to service members' families. You will not only treat their physical ailments, but you will also be their support system during difficult times and their advocate when necessary. You may find yourself providing care in various settings in the United States and abroad. No matter where you are stationed, you will be an essential part of the Navy team.

3. Provide emergency aid in developing countries:

As a Navy nurse, you will provide emergency aid in developing countries. You will be responsible for caring for patients needing immediate medical attention. Your skills as a Navy nurse will be put to the test in developing countries. This is a demanding role but one that is immensely rewarding. Emergency Aid offers medical support for those who need it the most, and you will be a vital part of this team.

4. Administering vaccines across the globe:

Vaccine administration is one of the many responsibilities of a Navy nurse. You as a Navy nurse are often deployed to vaccination sites worldwide to help protect people from disease. As a Navy nurse, you will administer vaccines to people of all ages, from infants to the elderly. You will also administer vaccines to animals, including horses and dogs.

5. Perform triage in the field:

Triaging is a critical component to the Navy nurse's job. In devastated areas, you will often have to make quick decisions about who is in most need of medical attention. Navy nurses are trained to triage patients based on their condition. You will use a variety of methods to assess a patient's condition, including taking vital signs and observing their symptoms. Navy nurses also use their experience and knowledge to make decisions about which patients need to be seen first.

6. Provide disaster relief:

Navy nurses provide disaster relief all over the world. As a Navy nurse, you are highly skilled and trained to provide care in some of the most challenging circumstances around the world. Navy nurses are often the first responders in times of disaster. They have provided relief to Hurricanes Katrina and Sandy victims, Haiti's earthquake, and the typhoon in the Philippines.

7. Educating, leading, and shaping policy within Navy Health Care:

As a Navy nurse, you will have the opportunity to provide Education, lead, and shape policy within Navy Health Care. You will be able to make a difference in the lives of those you serve and the world.

8. Instructing Hospital Corpsmen on how to provide quality patient care:

As a Navy nurse, you will be providing instruction to Hospital Corpsmen on how to deliver quality patient care. In order to be successful in this role, you must be able to communicate effectively and have a strong knowledge of the subject matter. Additionally, you must be able to work well under pressure and maintain a positive attitude.


Where Does A Navy Nurse Work?


1. On a Navy ship:

As a Navy nurse, one of the settings you may find yourself working in is on a Navy ship. Navy nurses are essential in providing healthcare to sailors and Marines while deployed at sea.

2. Combat zone:

Navy nurses are no strangers to difficult and dangerous situations. They work in some of the most challenging environments, providing care to those who need it most. Navy nurses are often the first responders in combat zones, providing life-saving care to those who have been injured in battle.

3. In a clinic:

Navy nurses work in a clinic setting. In this setting, you will provide medical care to sailors and Marines. You will also find them providing care to the family members of the service members. Clinics are typically found on naval bases. These clinics will offer a variety of services, including primary care, mental health care, and dental care.

4. In a hospital:

If you are looking for a career in nursing that will take you places, consider becoming a Navy nurse. These dedicated professionals work in hospitals worldwide, providing top-notch care to service members and their families. You will find navy nurses working in many different specialties. Some of the specialties that you could be working in are:

• Critical Care
• Education
• Emergency Trauma
• Manpower System Analysis
• Maternal/Infant
• Medical/Surgical
• Midwife Nurse
• Neonatal Intensive Care
• Nurse Anesthetist
• Nurse Practitioner (Family, Pediatric, Psychiatric, or Women’s Health)
• Pediatrics
• Perioperative
• Psychiatric
• Public Health
• Research
• Training Management



What Is The Typical Work Schedule Of A Navy Nurse?


The typical work schedule of an active duty Navy nurse will vary and depends on the position's specific duties. However, most Navy nurses work a rotating schedule that includes day, evening, and night shifts. Some positions may require working weekends or holidays. Nurses in the Navy Reserve typically work one weekend a month and two weeks out of the year.


What Are The Most Important Skills And Abilities Required To Successfully Work As A Navy Nurse?


When you are deciding on becoming a navy nurse, it is vital to ensure that you possess the essential skills to perform your job. There are a few very important skills that are needed to be successful. These skills are:

1. The ability to work well under pressure:

The ability to work well under pressure is probably the most crucial skill you can have as a navy nurse. You will often find yourself in situations where you must act quickly and efficiently to save lives. It is therefore essential that you are able to remain calm under pressure and think clearly to make the best decisions.

2. Excellent communication skills:

As a navy nurse, you will be required to communicate with a variety of different people on a daily basis. This includes patients, their families, and other medical team members. It is therefore essential that you have excellent written and verbal communication skills in order to be able to effectively communicate with all of these different groups of people.

3. Compassion:

One of the most essential qualities that you as a navy nurse must possess is compassion. This is because you will be working with patients who are often going through complex and challenging times in their lives. It is therefore essential that you are able to show compassion and empathy towards your patients in order to provide them with the best possible care.

4. Patience:

Another important quality that a navy nurse must possess is patience. This is because you will often be working with patients who may be going through a lot of pain or who may be feeling very frustrated and angry. It is therefore essential that you are able to remain calm and patient in order to provide the best possible care for your patients.

5. Excellent Assessment Skills:

As a Navy nurse you must be excellent at assessing patients. You will need to be able to quickly and accurately identify any problems or potential problems a patient may have. This ability is essential in providing quality care to patients.

6. Time Management Skills:

Navy nurses have to be able to manage their time effectively. You will need to be able to juggle multiple patients, tasks, and responsibilities all at once. Time management skills are essential for you to have as a navy nurse.

7. The ability to prioritize:

Navy nurses must have the ability to prioritize their patients' care. Prioritizing your patients is an important aspect of triaging. "Triage is the process of determining the priority of patients' treatments based on the severity of their condition." By utilizing a systematic approach to prioritizing, you as a navy nurse can provide safe and effective care for your patients.

8. Organization:

Navy nurses must be organized. It is your job to ensure the health and well-being of those in your care. From keeping track of medical records to providing patient care, you must be able to handle a variety of tasks.

9. Leadership skills:

Navy nurses must have good leadership skills in order to provide the best care possible for their patients. You must be able to delegate tasks, motivate others, and make decisions quickly in order to provide the best possible care for your patients.


How Much Does A Navy Nurse Make?


When you are trying to decide if you should become a Navy nurse, an essential factor to consider is how much does a navy nurse make? The average navy nurse's salary is $34.15 an hour. This will essentially equate to $5,920 a month or $71,026 a year. If you are just starting out in the career, the entry-level salary for a Navy nurse is $47,410 a year. This means you will be earning $22.79 an hour or $3,950 a month.

Once you have gained a bit more experience, one to four years, your salary will increase to $26.30 an hour or $4,560 a month. This will be an annual salary of $54,710. A Navy Nurse who has been working for five to nine years can expect the hourly wage to increase to $32.15 or $5,570. This will be an annual salary of $66,870.

After you have dedicated some time to this career, around ten to nineteen years, you can expect an annual salary of $83,080. This means you will earn an hourly rate of $39.94 or $6,920 monthly. After you have worked twenty or more years as a Navy nurse, you can expect your annual salary to increase to $103,180. This will breakdown into a monthly income of $8,600 or an hourly wage of $49.61

Level of Experience HourlyMonthlyAnnual
Entry-Level $22.79$3,950$47,410
1-4 Years of Experience $26.30$4,560$54,710
5-9 Years of Experience $32.15$5,570$66,870
10-19 Years of Experience $39.94$6,920$83,080
20 Years or More Experience $49.61$8,600$103,180
Average Salary$34.15$5,920$71,026


Is There A Demand For Navy Nurses?


When you are trying to decide on a career, it is essential to know if there is a demand for it. That is no different when you are trying to determine if you should become a navy nurse. You want to be sure that your skills will be in demand so you can have a successful career.

So, is there a demand for navy nurses? The answer is yes! Navy nurses are in high demand due to the many benefits they offer.

1. Experience:

One reason Navy nurses are in demand is because of the experience they can offer. Navy nurses have the opportunity to work in a variety of settings, including on ships and in hospitals. This means they can gain a wealth of experience that other nurses may not have.

2. Training:

Another reason why navy nurses are needed is because of the excellent training they receive. Navy nurses receive some of the best training in the world, making them highly sought after by employers.

3. Skill sets:

Finally, navy nurses also offer a unique set of skills that other nurses may not have. For example, navy nurses are trained to deal with mass casualties and provide medical care in austere environments. This makes them ideal candidates for working in disaster zones or other difficult situations.


What Is The Step-By-Step Process To Become A Navy Nurse?


1. The first step to becoming a Navy nurse is to earn a bachelor's degree in Nursing. You must be a Graduate of a school of nursing accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN) or the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE).

2. Next, you must pass the National Certification Licensure Exam (NCLEX). Your Nursing license must be current, unrestricted license, and in good standing.

3. If you are seeking the Navy Reserve, a minimum of three years of work experience in the practice of nursing is required.

4. For active-duty Navy nurses, you must then become an officer. The requirements that you must meet to become an officer in the Navy are:

1. Be a United States Citizen

2. Navy Nurse Corps applicants must be commissioned before their 42nd birthday. Waivers will be considered only on a case-by-case basis. A waiver may be approved in a restricted number of cases. These circumstances include when the candidate exceeds the statutory age for commissioning but otherwise has an extraordinary record or proven skill set required by the Navy.

3. You must pass a physical fitness test.

4. Active Duty: You may be recently licensed baccalaureate degree graduates.

Navy Reserves: You must have at least three months of work experience and be engaged in nursing practice.

5. Time Commitment: Active-duty commitment: Navy Nurse Corps selectees must commit to a 3-year active-duty obligation before your appointment. The remaining time of your service, up to a total of 8 years, may be served in a ready reserve condition.

Reserve obligation: Nurse Corps Reserve selectees will be required to serve an 8-year ready reserve duty, with the first three years as a Selected Reserve. Your commitment takes effect upon commissioning.

6. If you are new to the Navy, you will be expected to attend Officer Development School (ODS) in Newport, RI, after commissioning. ODS is a five-week curriculum that will familiarize you as a new nurse with Navy culture. You may not be required to attend ODS if you have been commissioned via a school NROTC program.

7. You must also be certified in Basic Life Support (BLS). Depending on your specialty, a navy nurse may also need an Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support (ACLS) certification or Pediatric Advance life support (PALS).




TOP CONS OF BEING A NAVY NURSE


(The following are the top 10 disadvantages of being a Navy Nurse.)

1. You could be deployed.

One of the biggest disadvantages of being a navy nurse is that you can get deployed at any time. Deployments can be for several months, and you will be away from your loved ones during that time. This can be very difficult, as you will miss important moments in the lives of your loved ones. Another downside is that you may not have a family and friends support network which will make it difficult to cope with the stress of deployment.

2. You will have a time commitment that must be met.

As an active duty navy nurse, you will have to incur a 3-year active-duty obligation beginning on the date of appointment. The remaining of your service time, up to a total of 8 years, may be served in a ready reserve condition. If you are in the Navy reserves, you will be required to serve an 8-year ready reserve duty, with the first three years as a Selected Reserve.

3. You may have to move multiple times.

One of the cons of being a navy nurse is that you will have to move around a lot. You might be stationed in California one year, and then the following year, you could be stationed in Florida. This can be tough for some people because they have to leave their life behind and start over again in a new place.

4. The Navy can place you where they want to.

As a Navy nurse, you will need to work in the unit where you are assigned. This means that if you are a critical care nurse and they need a nurse in Labor and Delivery, guess where you will work, Labor and Delivery. Suppose you are a nurse working in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), and they need a nurse in the Emergency Department. In that case, that is where you will work. There are no choices given as to what units you will work in; it is simply based on the needs of the Navy at that time.

5. I hope you do not get seasick.

One of the places where you can be stationed as a Navy nurse is on a ship at sea. If you have a problem with sea sickness, you might want to rethink your career choice! Who wants to spend the day in and day out feeling nauseous and queasy, barely able to keep anything down? Not me! I would rather be on land any day.

6. You must meet specific requirements to join.

Having the desire to serve the Navy as a Nurse is sometimes not good enough. Another one of the disadvantages of being a navy nurse is that you have to meet specific requirements in order to serve. If you do not meet these qualifications, then you will not be able to serve as a navy nurse. Some of the qualifications that you must meet include being a U.S. citizen, being between the ages of 18 and 41, and having a clean criminal record. Other criteria include being a certain height. You must be between 57 inches and 80 inches tall.

7. You must pass a physical fitness test.

As a Navy nurse, you will need to pass an annual physical fitness test. These standards include being able to swim 500 yards, run 1.5 miles in less than 12 minutes, and do at least 42 sit-ups.

8. You may work very long hours.

One of the top cons of being a navy nurse is the long hours. If you are not used to working long hours, this job may not be for you. You will have to work 12-hour shifts or even longer, depending on the circumstances. This can be tough on your body and your mind. You will need to be able to handle the long hours and the stress that comes with them.

9. Your rank may hinder you.

As an officer in the Navy, your rank may hinder you. Suppose you are applying for a job and you are clearly the best candidate for the position because you meet all the qualifications, but you are of a lower rank than another candidate. This higher-ranking candidate is lazy and is not a good leader, but unfortunately, that candidate will get the job over you because they outrank you.

10. You have to get permission for everything you do.

Another one of the cons of being a navy nurse is that you have to get permission for everything. This includes vacations and any type of leave. This permission must be written permission. So, if you are the type who likes to spontaneously take off on a whim, being a navy nurse is probably not your career.



TOP PROS OF BEING A NAVY NURSE


(The following are the top 10 advantages of being a Navy Nurse.)

1. You get to travel

One of the top pros of being a navy nurse is that you get to travel. You will be stationed at various hospitals around the world. You will have the opportunity to help people in need while seeing new places. This can be a great way to see the world and learn about different cultures.

2. Your pay is pretty good.

As a Navy nurse, you will make a pretty good salary. Making a good living will afford you the finer things in life. You will have a place to live, food to eat, and clothes to wear. All of this will be made possible by your Navy nursing salary. So, if you are considering a career in nursing, the Navy is a great option!

3. You can get loan forgiveness.

Another advantage of being a navy nurse is that you will have your student loans forgiven. That is right; after a certain amount of time serving in the Navy, your student loans will be forgiven. So, if you are worried about how you are going to pay back your loans, consider joining the Navy and becoming a nurse. You will be able to serve your country and eliminate your debt.

4. As your rank increases, so does your pay.

As a Navy nurse, your pay will increase as your rank does. You will be rewarded for your service. You will be able to provide for your family and live a comfortable life. You will have the opportunity to serve your country and make a difference in the world.

5. You can get particular special pay and bonuses.

Another one of the pros of being a Navy nurse is the extra pay and bonuses you can receive for serving. For example, you will receive hazardous duty pay if you serve in a hazardous duty location. Suppose you are forced to be away from your family for long periods of time. In that case, you will receive family separation pay. And if you have a specialty, you may be eligible for bonuses. So, not only do you get to help people and serve your country, but you also get paid extra for it!

6. You will have educational opportunities.

As a Navy nurse, you will have access to excellent educational opportunities. You can take advantage of tuition assistance and duty under instruction programs to pursue a post-graduate degree. With the Navy's support, you can continue your education and grow your career.

7. You will have leadership opportunities.

Another one of the top pros of being a navy nurse is the leadership opportunities you will have. Not only will you be taking care of patients and helping save lives, but you will also be in charge of other nurses and medical staff. This is an excellent opportunity to impact people's lives and make a difference in the world.

8. You will get medical and dental benefits if you are on active duty

If you are considering a career in nursing, the Navy is a great option. Not only will you get excellent training and experience, but you will also receive fantastic benefits, including medical and dental coverage. So, if you are looking for a rewarding career that comes with great benefits, consider becoming a Navy nurse!

9. Your family will get medical and dental benefits if you are on active duty

One of the biggest advantages of being a navy nurse is that your family will get medical and dental benefits if you are on active duty. This can be a huge relief financially, and it can help you focus on your career without having to worry about your family's health.

10. You can have a living stipend.

As a Navy nurse, you can have a living stipend that helps you cover the costs of housing, food, and other essentials. This stipend can help you live a more comfortable life while serving your country.



BREAKING DOWN THE SALARY OF A NAVY NURSE


What Is The Starting Salary Of A Navy Nurse?


The starting salary of a navy nurse is $47,410 annually. This figure is essentially $3,950 a month or $912 a week. You will have an hourly wage of $22.79.

Hourly$22.79
Weekly $912
Monthly$3,950
Annual$47,410


What Is The Average Salary Of A Navy Nurse?


The average navy nurse salary is $71,026 a year or $5,920 a month. This is $1,366 a week or an hourly wage of $34.15 an hour.

Hourly$34.15
Weekly $1,366
Monthly$5,920
Annual$71,026
(Source: Ziprecruiter.com)


What Is The Average Navy Nurse Salary In Your State?


The average Navy nurse's salary will differ depending on the state you practice in. For example, you will earn $53,470 a year in Alabama. Now, in California, you will be making quite a bit more. Here you will be earning $107,020 a year. What is shocking about the salary difference you see between these two states is that you are being paid drastically different amounts for the same job.

State Hourly Monthly Annual
Alabama $25.71 $4,460 $53,470
Alaska $40.66 $7,050 $84,570
Arizona $34.30 $5,950 $71,350
Arkansas $27.16 $4,710 $56,490
California $51.45 $8,920 $107,020
Colorado $33.23 $5,760 $69,120
Connecticut $36.21 $6,280 $75,320
Delaware $31.72 $5,500 $65,980
Florida $29.67 $5,140 $61,710
Georgia $30.52 $5,290 $63,480
Hawaii $44.74 $7,760 $93,060
Idaho $30.58 $5,300 $63,600
Illinois $31.82 $5,520 $66,190
Indiana $28.80 $4,990 $59,910
Iowa $26.70 $4,630 $55,540
Kansas $27.40 $4,750 $56,990
Kentucky $27.63 $4,790 $57,460
Louisiana $29.02 $5,030 $60,370
Maine $30.32 $5,260 $63,060
Maryland $34.82 $6,040 $72,430
Massachusetts $41.08 $7,120 $85,440
Michigan $31.57 $5,470 $65,670
Minnesota $34.55 $5,990 $71,870
Mississippi $26.14 $4,530 $54,370
Missouri $28.13 $4,880 $58,500
Montana $30.10 $5,220 $62,610
Nebraska $29.65 $5,140 $61,680
Nevada $38.30 $6,640 $79,670
New Hampshire $32.42 $5,620 $67,440
New Jersey $36.58 $6,340 $76,090
New Mexico $32.31 $5,600 $67,200
New York $38.31 $6,640 $79,680
North Carolina $29.43 $5,100 $61,210
North Dakota $29.72 $5,150 $61,810
Ohio $29.77 $5,160 $61,920
Oklahoma $28.42 $4,930 $59,120
Oregon $41.07 $7,120 $85,420
Pennsylvania $31.65 $5,490 $65,840
Rhode Island $35.33 $6,120 $73,490
South Carolina $28.65 $4,970 $59,600
South Dakota $26.02 $4,510 $54,120
Tennessee $27.37 $4,740 $56,920
Texas $32.78 $5,680 $68,180
Utah $30.03 $5,210 $62,470
Vermont $30.79 $5,340 $64,040
Virginia $31.75 $5,500 $66,030
Washington $38.97 $6,760 $81,060
West Virginia $27.80 $4,820 $57,820
Wisconsin $31.91 $5,530 $66,370
Wyoming $30.99 $5,370 $64,450



HIGHEST PAID NAVY NURSES IN THE NATION


What Are The 10 Highest Paying States For Navy Nurses?


So, now that you know that different states pay different salaries for Navy nurses, I am sure that you want to know what the highest paying states are for navy nurses. California is the highest paying state for Navy nurses, paying $107,020 annually. Hawaii is not far behind, paying $93,060. Massachusetts, Oregon, Alaska, and Washington all pay salaries in the $80,000 range. New York, Nevada, New Jersey, and Connecticut will all have you earning wages in the $70,000 range.

Rank State Average
Annual Salary
1 California $107,020
2 Hawaii $93,060
3 Massachusetts $85,440
4 Oregon $85,420
5 Alaska $84,570
6 Washington $81,060
7 New York $79,680
8 Nevada $79,670
9 New Jersey $76,090
10 Connecticut $75,320


What Are The 10 Highest Paying Metros For Navy Nurses?


So, you already know that California is the highest paying state for Navy nurses, but now let’s take a look at the highest paying metros for navy nurses. The highest paying metro for Navy nurses is San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, CA. Here you will be earning $132,450 a year. The lowest-paying metro out of the ten highest-paying metros is Redding, CA. In this metro of California, you will be earning $99,300.

Rank Metro Average
Annual Salary
1 San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, CA $132,450
2 San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA $130,380
3 Vallejo-Fairfield, CA $126,180
4 Sacramento--Roseville--Arden-Arcade, CA $119,260
5 Salinas, CA $117,320
6 Santa Rosa, CA $110,820
7 Modesto, CA $107,490
8 Stockton-Lodi, CA $102,850
9 Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, CA $100,420
10 Redding, CA $99,300



Top Organizations And Associations For Navy Nurses


Navy Nurse Corps Association (NNCA): The Navy Nurse Corps Association is a non-profit organization that was established in 1987 to bring together all nurses, regardless of rank or status. The NNCA is dedicated to preserving the rich history and traditions of Navy Nurses. You will find links to resources for Navy Nurses on their site and information about reunions.

American Nurses Association: The American Nurses Association is an outstanding source for any nurse looking to advance their career. The site offers articles on all topics related to certification, education opportunities, and even some job listings!


My Final Thoughts


So, are you feeling the call of the sea? The Navy Nurse Corps is a unique and exciting way to serve your country while making a difference in people’s lives. We have outlined the top 10 pros and cons of being a navy nurse + salary + steps to become one, so, if you decide that this is the right path for you, we wish you all the best on your journey. After reading the pros and cons of being a navy nurse, if you decide this is not the path for you, well, we have plenty of nursing career articles for you to check out.


FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ANSWERED BY OUR EXPERT


1. Is Navy Nursing A Good Career?

Yes, being a navy nurse is a good career. This is a career that will provide you with a good income and one that is stable. You can be proud of the career path that you have chosen.


2. On Average, How Much Does A Navy Nurse Make Per Hour?

The average navy nurse's salary per hour is $34.15.

$34.15


3. How Many Hours A Week Does A Navy Nurse Work?

As a Navy Nurse, the number of hours you will be working will depend on the type of setting you decide to work in, as well as if it is peacetime or wartime. You will typically be working 40 hours a week if it is peacetime. You may find yourself working well over that 40-hour mark if it is wartime.


4. Is Being A Navy Nurse Stressful?

Yes, being a Navy nurse can be stressful at times. Remember, you may be dealing with life and death situations.


5. Do I Need To Be Certified To Work As A Navy Nurse?

Currently, there is no certification for Navy Nurses.


6. What Certifications Are Required Or Recommended For A Navy Nurse?

A required certification for navy nurses is essential life support (BLS). Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) and Pediatric advanced life support (PALS) may be required based on your work setting.


7. How Long Does It Take To Become A Navy Nurse?

Being a Navy nurse will take around four years and five weeks. You will need four years to earn your Bachelor's degree in Nursing and the 5 weeks to complete the Officer Development Curriculum.


8. How Much Does It Cost To Become A Navy Nurse?

A Bachelor’s degree in Nursing will cost anywhere from $20,000 to $200,000.


9. What Kind Of Career Advancement Opportunities Are There For Navy Nurses?

Since you already have your Bachelor's degree in Nursing, you can achieve your advanced degree goal. You can become a nurse practitioner, a nurse-midwife, or you could earn a master's in administration or education.


10. What Are The 5 Most Common Navy Nurse Interview Questions?

1. What is your greatest weakness for the position of Navy nurse?
2. Why do you want to be a Navy Nurse?
3. How do you handle stressful situations?
4. Do you prefer to work alone or in teams?
5. What do you know about the role of a Navy Nurse?



11. How Many Navy Nurses Are There?

There are currently 4,540 nurses in the Navy.


12. Can You Become A Nurse While In The Navy?

The Navy requires that you hold a Bachelor's Degree in Nursing before becoming a commissioned officer in the Navy. The Navy will not train you to become a nurse.


13. Is There A Height Requirement For Navy Nursing?

The Navy does not have specific height standards but requires an applicant to measure between 57 and 80 inches tall. The Navy will not supply waivers for individuals who measure outside this range.


14. What Are The Physical Requirements To Be A Navy Nurse?

You will be required to meet certain standards as a Navy nurse. You will need to meet the height requirement and measure between 57inches to 80 inches. You will also need to meet the weight standards for your height. If you are unable to meet this weight standard, you must then meet the abdominal circumference. To qualify based on the abdominal circumference measurement (ACM), it must be equal to or less than the maximum allowed (39 inches for a male or 35.5 inches for a female). You must then be able to complete the Physical Readiness Test. (PRT)


15. How Long Is Navy Nurse Training?

Navy nurse training is 5 weeks long. Navy Nurses are required to attend Officer Development School in Newport, RI.


16. Do Navy Nurses Have To Go To Bootcamp?

Navy nurses do not have to go to Bootcamp. This is because if you are a NAVY nurse, you are a commissioned officer, not an enlisted sailor.


17. Do Navy Nurses Go On Ships?

Not all Navy nurses will be stationed on ships. However, there will be times that you will find Navy nurses on ships.


18. What Rank Do Nurses In The Navy Start At?

A Navy nurse will start at the rank of 0-1. From here, you can work your way up the ranks.


19. What Is The Highest Rank For A Nurse In The Navy?

The highest rank for a Navy nurse is an Admiral or a rank of 0-10.


20. How Long Are Navy Nurse Contracts?

For Active Duty: Three years (36 months) from the appointment date. The remainder of service, sufficient to complete eight years total, may be served in an individual ready reserve status (IRR).

Navy Reserve: Selectees will incur an 8-year ready reserve obligation, of which the first 3 years must be as a Selected Reserve. The obligation commences upon commissioning.


21. Do Navy Nurses Get Deployed?

Yes, Navy nurses can be deployed.


22. How Often Do Navy Nurses Get Deployed?

There is no set amount of how often a Navy nurse can be deployed. Your deployment will depend on the need of the Navy.


23. How Long Are Navy Nurse Deployments?

Navy nurse deployment can last anywhere from six to seven months but may last longer if there is a need.


24. Do Navy Reserve Nurses Get Deployed?

Yes, Navy reserve nurses have the potential to get deployed.


25. What Is A Navy Nurse Corps?

The Navy Nurse Corps is a team of military health professionals. This team provides care to service members at Military Treatment Facilities, hospitals, on ships, and with Marines stateside and at various overseas locations. Navy nurses will also deploy to support combat operations, disaster relief efforts, and humanitarian assistance missions around the world.


26. How Old Is The Navy Nurse Corps?

The Navy Nurse Corps was started in 1908, which means that in 2022, the Navy Nurse Corps will be 114 years old.


27. How Do I Join The Navy Nurse Corps?

You will be able to join the Navy nurse Corps once you have satisfied the educational and physical requirements. Once you have achieved these requirements, you can contact a recruiter to start the ball rolling.


28. What Is A Navy Nurse Candidate Program?

The Nurse Candidate School (NCP) provides financial aid to full-time students attending an authorized baccalaureate nursing program. The NCP will pay a monthly stipend to full-time students enrolled in authorized Bachelor of Science Nursing programs that are accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) or the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission, Inc. (NLNAC). After graduation, you will join the Navy as a Commissioned officer.


29. How Competitive Is The Navy Nurse Candidate Program?

The Navy Nurse Candidate Program is challenging, but it is not impossible once you have satisfied the requirements.


30. Where Do Navy Nurses Train?

Navy nurses will train in Newport, Rhode Island.


31. Is It Better To Be A Nurse In The Navy OR Air Force?

There is not one branch of the military better than the other. Which branch of the military is better is based on personal preference.


32. What Is The Age Limit For Navy Nursing?

You must join the Navy nursing ranks prior to your 42nd birthday. However, in certain circumstances, an age waiver may be provided.


33. Where Do Most Navy Nurses Get Stationed?

You can be stationed at any of the 250 facilities that the Navy has worldwide.


34. What Do Navy Nurses Wear?

At times, NAVY nurses will wear active combat uniforms (ACUs), Active Battle Uniform (ABU), or Scrubs.


35. Do Navy Nurses Wear Scrubs?

Yes, Navy Nurses will wear scrubs at times.


36. Do Navy Nurses Get Special Pay?

There are various special pay opportunities for Navy nurses. Some examples of this special pay include incentive, hazard pay, and accession pay. Here is a complete list of special pay opportunities.


37. Do Navy Nurses Make More Than RN?

As a Navy nurse, your annual salary will be 0.98% higher than a civilian RN. This is $691.00 more annually.

Navy Nurse
Average Annual Salary
RN Average
Annual Salary
Difference
Number %
$71,026$70,335+$691+0.98%
(Source: Ziprecruiter.com)


Jennifer Schlette MSN, RN
Jennifer Schlette is a registered nurse in pediatric critical care in New York City. She is the former Director of Undergraduate Nursing at a college located in New York. After obtaining her BSN from the College of Mount Saint Vincent, she went on to complete her MSN.