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7 Main Types of Nurses and Salaries in 2022


Written By: Darby Faubion BSN, RN

Are you considering a career in the nursing industry? If so, you likely have questions about the types of nurses and salaries that are available. Perhaps you have asked yourself the question, “What are the main types of nurses and salaries in 2022?” While there are many to choose from, in this article, I will share the 7 main types of nurses and salaries in 2022. As you continue reading, you will find information about each of the seven types of nursing professionals, the wages they earn, the projected job outlook, and how you can get started in one of these promising careers. (Please note all the data on this page was sourced from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.)


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WHAT ARE THE 7 MAIN TYPES OF NURSES & WHAT DO THEY DO?

(The seven main types of nurses in the United States include Certified Nursing Assistants, Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurses, Registered Nurses, Nurse Educators, Certified Nurse-Midwives, Nurse Practitioners, and Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists.)

Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA):

Certified Nursing Assistants, often referred to as Nursing Assistants or CNAs, are unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP). Although they do not hold a nursing license, Certified Nursing Assistants are essential members of the nursing team, which is why they are included in our list of the seven main types of nurses in the United States. Certified Nursing Assistants work under the supervision of licensed nurses. The primary role of CNAs involves all aspects of direct patient care. Daily responsibilities of nursing assistants may include assisting with activities of daily living (ADLs) such as bathing, grooming, dressing, and feeding patients.

Licensed Practical Nurse/ Licensed Vocational Nurse (LPN/LVN):

A Licensed Practical Nurse/Licensed Vocational Nurse is a nursing professional specializing in providing essential nursing care to patients in various settings. LPN/LVNs work under the direct supervision of registered nurses. Responsibilities of Licensed Vocational/Practical Nurses include performing patient assessments, monitoring vital signs, administering medications and treatments, assisting the RN or other healthcare professional with treatments when needed, and offering support to clients and their loved ones.

Registered Nurse (RN):

Registered Nurses hold a minimum associate degree in nursing. RNs coordinate and provide patient care in various healthcare environments. They supervise licensed practical/vocational nurses and nursing assistants. Some RNs work in case management or supervisory or administrative roles. Daily responsibilities of registered nurses include performing initial patient assessments, collaborating with members of the interdisciplinary team, performing wound care, and providing education to patients and their families about diagnoses, treatment plans, and expected outcomes.

Nurse Educator (NE):

Anyone who understands nursing will admit Nurse Educators are the backbone of the nursing profession. Nurse Educators work in colleges, universities, and some healthcare facilities. These exceptional nurses are dedicated to educating and preparing the nurses of tomorrow. Additionally, some Nurse Educators work within healthcare facilities, such as hospitals, and provide education to nursing personnel and/or to patients and their caregivers.

Certified Nurse Midwife (CNM):

The Certified Nurse Midwife is an advanced practice registered nurse who specializes in the care of pregnant women before, during, and after childbirth. At times, Certified Nurse-Midwives provide care to newborns during the immediate postpartum period and educate women about reproductive and sexual health issues. Certified Nurse-Midwives may work in independent practices, hospitals, the offices of OB/GYNs, and birthing centers. In addition to providing perinatal care for women, some CNMs perform wellness visits for women of all ages. They prescribe medications, order laboratory and other diagnostic tests, interpret results, and create care plans appropriate for each client.

Nurse Practitioner (NP):

A Nurse Practitioner is a registered nurse with a master’s or doctorate in nursing who provides patient care in a clinical setting. Nurse Practitioners work both autonomously and in collaboration with other members of the healthcare delivery team. NPs bring a personal touch and comprehensive approach to clinical nursing experiences and use those skills to diagnose and treat health conditions, promote disease prevention, and improve patient outcomes.

Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA):

Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists are advanced practice registered nurses who administer anesthesia to patients undergoing medical procedures such as surgery. This specialized group of nurses administer anesthesia, monitor patients throughout procedures and postoperatively, identify possible risks to anesthesia and provide education to patients and caregivers.



CURRENT SALARIES, PAST SALARY GROWTH & SALARY OUTLOOK

(The salaries for the seven main types of nurses in the United States vary, sometimes significantly. Below, you will find in-depth salary information for each one of them.)

STARTING SALARY FOR THE 7 MAIN TYPES OF NURSES

The following is a list of the average starting salaries for the seven main types of nurses in the United States.


1. Certified Nursing Assistant:

The average entry-level Certified Nursing Assistant salary is $22,750 per year. This is an equivalent of $10.94 hourly, $440 weekly, or $1,900 per month. Nursing Assistants who work in specialized areas of healthcare facilities such as intensive care units, emergency departments, or telemetry typically earn incomes on the higher end of the salary scale.

Hourly Weekly Monthly Annual
$10.94 $440 $1,900 $22,750


2. Licensed Practical Nurse/ Licensed Vocational Nurse:

Licensed Practical Nurse/Licensed Vocational Nurses entering the workforce earn an average annual salary of $35,570 or $2,960 per month, equal to $680 per week or $17.10 hourly.

Hourly Weekly Monthly Annual
$17.10 $680 $2,960 $35,570


3. Registered Nurse:

Registered Nurses earn generous salaries that average $25.68 per hour in entry-level positions. This pay, equal to $1,030 weekly, $4,450 monthly, or $53,410 annually, is almost $20,000 more than the average individual income in the United States.

Hourly Weekly Monthly Annual
$25.68 $1,030 $4,450 $53,410


4. Nurse Educator:

Nurse Educators, some of the most influential people in the nursing industry, earn approximately $41,930 per year at the beginning of their careers. This is the equivalent of $3,490 monthly, $810 weekly, or $20.16 hourly.

Hourly Weekly Monthly Annual
$20.16 $810 $3,490 $41,930


5. Certified Nurse Midwife:

Certified Nurse-Midwives entering the nursing profession earn nearly $68,000 annually. Their pay rate averages $32.55 per hour, equal to $1,300 weekly or $5,640 monthly.

Hourly Weekly Monthly Annual
$32.55 $1,300 $5,640 $67,710


6. Nurse Practitioner:

The entry-level nurse practitioner salary is $82,960, on average. New nurse practitioners earn $39.88 per hour, which is equivalent to $1,600 weekly or $6,910 monthly, making five and a half times the national minimum wage.

Hourly Weekly Monthly Annual
$39.88 $1,600 $6,910 $82,960


7. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist:

The Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist salary is one of the highest entry-level nursing salaries. CRNAs earn nearly $134,000 annually, averaging $64.41 per hour, $2,580 weekly, or $11,160 monthly at the start of their careers.

Hourly Weekly Monthly Annual
$64.41 $2,580 $11,160 $133,970

What Type Of Nurse Earns The Highest Starting Salary?

With an average starting income of nearly $133,970, Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists earn the highest starting salaries of all the types of nurses featured in this article.

Why Starting Salary Is An Important Factor To Consider When Deciding What Type Of Nurse To Become?

As you research the different types of nurses, it is natural to consider your starting salary in each position. Knowing what income you can expect in an entry-level position will be helpful as you decide which career path to follow. Consider making a list of your expenses and any other income and compare that to the starting salary for the different nursing positions you are researching to find the one that will be a good fit for your financial goals.


AVERAGE SALARY FOR THE 7 MAIN TYPES OF NURSES

The following is a list of the average annual salaries for the 7 main types of nurses in the United States.


1. Certified Nursing Assistant:

In the United States, the average annual income for Certified Nursing Assistants is $32,050. This pay equals $2,670 monthly, $620 weekly, or$15.41 per hour, a little more than twice the national minimum wage.

Hourly Weekly Monthly Annual
$15.41 $620 $2,670 $32,050


2. Licensed Practical Nurse/ Licensed Vocational Nurse:

Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurses on an average earn approximately $24.08 per hour, equivalent to $960 weekly, $4,170 monthly, or $50,090 annually.

Hourly Weekly Monthly Annual
$24.08 $960 $4,170 $50,090


3. Registered Nurse:

Nurses who choose to pursue a degree as a Registered Nurse earn an average of $30,000 more each year than LPN/LVNs with yearly incomes of around $80,000. The hourly pay rate for RNs averages $38.47 per hour, $1,540 weekly, or $6,670 monthly.

Hourly Weekly Monthly Annual
$38.47 $1,540 $6,670 $80,010


4. Nurse Educator:

The average Nurse Educator salary figured on an hourly basis of $40.41 comes to $1,620 weekly. This means Nurse Educators earn approximately $7,010 monthly or $84.060 yearly.

Hourly Weekly Monthly Annual
$40.41 $1,620 $7,010 $84,060


5. Certified Nurse Midwife:

With an hourly rate of $55.55, equal to $2,220 weekly or 9,630 monthly, Certified Nurse-Midwives earn very generous incomes. These figures come toan average Certified Nurse Midwife salary of $115,540 yearly.

Hourly Weekly Monthly Annual
$55.55 $2,220 $9,630 $115,540


6. Nurse Practitioner:

Nurse Practitioners are another type of nurse that earn a six-figure income. With all specialties considered, Nurse Practitioners earn an average annual income of $114,510. The annual wage is $55.05 hourly, $2,200 weekly, or $9,540 monthly.

Hourly Weekly Monthly Annual
$55.05 $2,200 $9,540 $114,510


7. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist:

Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists are some of the highest income earners in the nursing industry. These graduate-level nurses earn nearly $91 per hour, $3,640 weekly, or $15,770 monthly. This makes the average annual CRNA salary $189,190.

Hourly Weekly Monthly Annual
$90.96 $3,640 $15,770 $189,190

What Type Of Nurse Earns The Highest Average Salary?

With an average annual income of nearly $190,000, Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists earn the highest salaries of all the main types of nurses in the United States.

Why Average Salary Is An Important Factor To Consider When Deciding What Type Of Nurse To Become?

Choosing a career path is one of the most important decisions any person can make. There are several things to consider when doing so, including researching the income opportunities. Depending on the types of nursing jobs that interest you, the average salaries will vary somewhat. Still, knowing the average salary can give you something to gauge your decision upon. As you research the types of nursing jobs that interest you, keep in mind that factors such as demand, geographical area, years of experience, and specialty area may impact your earning potential. Therefore, the "average" may differ for some job candidates.


SALARY BY LEVEL OF EXPERIENCE FOR THE 7 MAIN TYPES OF NURSES

Years of work experience are among the most influential factors in determining a person's income potential. Below you will see how salaries change with experience for the 7 main types of nurses in the United States. Keep in mind, the salaries below are based on nationwide averages and may vary depending on other factors.


1. Certified Nursing Assistant:

Certified Nursing Assistants typically begin their careers with salaries averaging near $23,000 per year. By the time they have one to four years of experience, the CNA salary increases by around $4,000, increasing to approximately $26,650. With ten years' experience, Nursing Assistants can earn almost $37,000 annually. Certified Nursing Assistants who stick with their chosen role and gain twenty years of work experience or more may earn more than $42,000 yearly.

Starting (Entry-Level) 1-4 Years of Experience 5-9 Years of Experience 10-19 Years of Experience 20 Years or More Experience
$22,750 $26,650 $30,850 $36,990 $42,110


2. Licensed Practical Nurse/ Licensed Vocational Nurse:

The average starting salary for a Licensed Practical Nurse/Licensed Vocational Nurse is $35,570. In the five-to-nine-year span of work as an LPN/LVN, the nurse may earn almost $49,000 annually. With twenty or more years of experience, Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurses can earn almosttwice their starting salaries with incomes of about $65,520 yearly.

Starting (Entry-Level) 1-4 Years of Experience 5-9 Years of Experience 10-19 Years of Experience 20 Years or More Experience
$35,570 $42,060 $48,820 $57,860 $65,520


3. Registered Nurse:

The higher your degree, the higher your income earning potential, as evidenced by the difference in the LPN/LVN and RN salary. Registered Nurses earn entry-level wages of approximately $53,410. Their pay typically increases by $8,000 within the first four years of work. With ten years of experience, an RN can earn more than $93,000 annually. The Registered Nurse who continues in this role and has twenty or more years of experience can earn an average of $116,230 per year.

Starting (Entry-Level) 1-4 Years of Experience 5-9 Years of Experience 10-19 Years of Experience 20 Years or More Experience
$53,410 $61,630 $75,330 $93,590 $116,230


4. Nurse Educator:

Nurse Educators are perfect examples of how remaining constant in a career choice can really pay off. The entry-level salary for these nurses is $41,930. Within ten years, Nurse Educators can earn two and a half times their starting salaries with incomes of more than $100,000. Longevity is key, which is evident when you consider a twenty-year or longer career as a Nurse Educator can bring in incomes more than three times their entry-level pay, approximately $133,420.

Starting (Entry-Level) 1-4 Years of Experience 5-9 Years of Experience 10-19 Years of Experience 20 Years or More Experience
$41,930 $57,660 $75,470 $100,330 $133,420


5. Certified Nurse Midwife:

Certified Nurse-Midwives earn one of the highest incomes among the 7 types of nurses in the United States. CNMs typically begin their careers with an average income of $67,710. In as little as one to four years, their income can increase to more than $91,000 per year. By the time a Certified Nurse Midwife gains ten to twenty years of clinical experience, the CNM salarycan increase to wages that range from $136,000 to nearly $180,000.

Starting (Entry-Level) 1-4 Years of Experience 5-9 Years of Experience 10-19 Years of Experience 20 Years or More Experience
$67,710 $91,590 $111,130 $136,960 $179,770


6. Nurse Practitioner:

Nurse Practitioners are among the types of nurses who can choose from several specialties to focus their practices. The NP salaries in this chart are an average of all Nurse Practitioner specialties. These graduate-degree nurses begin their careers with salaries of approximately $82,960. In five years, many Nurse Practitioners earn nearly $112,000 per year. Once an NP gains twenty years of work experience or more, they make more than $156,000 annually.

Starting (Entry-Level) 1-4 Years of Experience 5-9 Years of Experience 10-19 Years of Experience 20 Years or More Experience
$82,960 $94,890 $111,680 $130,240 $156,160


7. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist:

The Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist tops the list of income earning potential with entry-level incomes that average $133,970. With as little as one to four years of work experience, the CRNA salary may increase by more than $20,000, making their annual incomes just short of $95,000. By the time a Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist reaches the ten-year mark in work experience, they can earn $208,000, a salary that is likely to increase yearly throughout their careers.

Starting (Entry-Level) 1-4 Years of Experience 5-9 Years of Experience 10-19 Years of Experience 20 Years or More Experience
$133,970 $154,540 $183,580 > $208,000 > $208,000


What Type Of Nurse Earns The Highest Salary With Increasing Years Of Experience?

Among the diverse kinds of nurses featured in our article, those who earn graduate degrees such as master's or doctorate in nursing typically earn higher salaries. Nurse Practitioners, Certified Nurse-Midwives and Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists are examples of the nurses who earn the highest wages and whose earning potential increases the most with increased years of experience.

Why Salary By Level Of Experience Is An Important Factor To Consider When Deciding What Type Of Nurse To Become?

Comparing salary potential by the level of experience is an essential factor in most people's opinions. While you may be satisfied with an entry-level salary, experienced nurses can be an asset to patients, employers, and the nursing industry. Higher salaries are one way to show appreciation for that.


AVERAGE ANNUAL COMPENSATION FOR THE 7 MAIN TYPES OF NURSES IN GOVERNMENT & PRIVATE ORGANIZATIONS

The type of work setting is one factor that influences the compensation offered to nurses. For example, in this section, we will compare the difference between the salaries the seven main types of nurses earn in government and private organizations. Salary and benefits are combined to create "total compensation." Benefits include insurance, paid sick or vacation time, retirement contributions, or other benefits as required by law. As you will see in the charts below, benefits are an excellent way to boost the value of a compensation package. If a prospective employer does not discuss a benefits package with you when you apply for a job, be sure to initiate a conversation about it.


1. Certified Nursing Assistant:

The average annual salary for Certified Nursing Assistants ranges from $31,750 to $34,930 for private workplaces and state and local government jobs, respectively. However, when you add the value of potential benefits packages, the income differences in the two types of facilities differ by more than $11,000. CNAs who work in state or local government offices and facilities can see total compensation of approximately $56,430. In comparison, those who work for private institutions have total salary and compensation packages of just over $45,000 per year.

Component State and Local
Government
Private
Workplace
Paid Leave $4,289 $3,342
Supplemental Pay $564 $1,581
Insurance $6,602 $3,523
Retirement and Savings $6,997 $1,536
Legally Required $3,104 $3,432
Total Benefits $21,500 $13,414
Average Annual Salary $34,930 $31,750
Total Compensation $56,430 $45,164


2. Licensed Practical Nurse/ Licensed Vocational Nurse:

Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurses who work without a benefits package earn an average salary of $49,700 when working in a government agency or $50,150 in private healthcare facilities. LPN/LVNs are often offered benefits packages valued between $21,000 and $30,000 or more. With added benefits, a Licensed Practical Nurse/Licensed Vocational Nurse can see total compensation offers from $71,337 in private workplaces to $80,291 if they work in a state or local government facility.

Component State and Local
Government
Private
Workplace
Paid Leave $6,102 $5,279
Supplemental Pay $803 $2,497
Insurance $9,394 $5,564
Retirement and Savings $9,956 $2,425
Legally Required $4,416 $5,422
Total Benefits $30,591 $21,187
Average Annual Salary $49,700 $50,150
Total Compensation $80,291 $71,337


3. Registered Nurse:

Registered Nurses who work for state or local governments earn an average of $132,116 with benefits packages valued at more than $50,000. In private workplaces, the RN salary falls about $20,000 short of the wages offered by government facilities. Nevertheless, Registered Nurses who work for private facilities still earn a six-figure income with benefits and salary combined to make a total compensation of approximately $113,300.

Component State and Local
Government
Private
Workplace
Paid Leave $10,041 $8,384
Supplemental Pay $1,321 $3,966
Insurance $15,458 $8,837
Retirement and Savings $16,382 $3,852
Legally Required $7,266 $8,611
Total Benefits $50,336 $33,650
Average Annual Salary $81,780 $79,650
Total Compensation $132,116 $113,300


4. Nurse Educator:

The total compensation for Nurse Educators varies little from private workplaces to state and local government settings. The way the total compensation is figured is where the difference can be seen. For example, in government facilities, the average Nurse Educator's salary is near $77,000. Their benefits packages often total more than $47,000, making their total compensation $124,362. In private settings, Nurse Educators often earn higher base salaries, around $86,920. Nurse Educators in privatesettings may have benefits packages of lesser value, approximately $36,722.

Component State and Local
Government
Private
Workplace
Paid Leave $9,452 $9,149
Supplemental Pay $1,244 $4,327
Insurance $14,550 $9,644
Retirement and Savings $15,421 $4,204
Legally Required $6,840 $9,397
Total Benefits $47,382 $36,722
Average Annual Salary $76,980 $86,920
Total Compensation $124,362 $123,642


5. Certified Nurse Midwife:

Like Nurse Educators, Certified Nurse-Midwives see a bit of variance in their total income when comparing average annual salary and benefits packages. Certified Nurse-Midwives have higher average annual salaries in private workplaces, but those who work for state and local governments have higher benefits package values. The total compensation for both types of employment settings only differs by about $5,000, with government agenciespaying $166,446 on average and private organizations paying $161,053.

Component State and Local
Government
Private
Workplace
Paid Leave $12,650 $11,918
Supplemental Pay $1,664 $5,637
Insurance $19,474 $12,562
Retirement and Savings $20,639 $5,476
Legally Required $9,155 $12,240
Total Benefits $63,416 $47,833
Average Annual Salary $103,030 $113,220
Total Compensation $166,446 $161,053


6. Nurse Practitioner:

Nurse Practitioners often receive benefits packages valued between $48,000 and $69,749, depending on their work setting. Among the 7 main types of nurses in the United States, nurse practitioners are among the highest income earners with total compensation of $163,030 in private workplaces and $183,069 in local or state government facilities.

Component State and Local
Government
Private
Workplace
Paid Leave $13,913 $12,064
Supplemental Pay $1,831 $5,706
Insurance $21,419 $12,716
Retirement and Savings $22,701 $5,543
Legally Required $10,069 $12,390
Total Benefits $69,749 $48,420
Average Annual Salary $113,320 $114,610
Total Compensation $183,069 $163,030


7. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist:

Again, Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists are among some of the highest-paid nurses in the industry. With annual salaries that range from $187,950 to $199,860, their incomes are generous. CRNAs employed in private workplaces can receive benefits valued at over $79,000, and those in government positions may have benefits packages worth six figures. In fact, the total compensation for Certified Nurse Registered Anesthetist in state or local government averages $322,876, and the CRNAs who work in private practice receive more than $267,000 yearly!

Component State and Local
Government
Private
Workplace
Paid Leave $24,539 $19,784
Supplemental Pay $3,229 $9,357
Insurance $37,776 $20,854
Retirement and Savings $40,037 $9,090
Legally Required $17,758 $20,319
Total Benefits $123,016 $79,404
Average Annual Salary $199,860 $187,950
Total Compensation $322,876 $267,354


What Type Of Nurse Earns The Highest Average Annual Compensation (Salary + Benefits)?

Certified Nurse-Midwives, Nurse Practitioners, and Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists earn the highest average annual compensation among the different kinds of nurses featured here. Benefits packages for these types of nurses range from $47,833 to $123,016. Their average yearly salaries range from $103,030 to $199,860.

Why Average Annual Compensation Is An Important Factor When Deciding What Type Of Nurse To Become?

Considering the total average annual compensation is always a good idea when deciding which type of nursing career interests you most. Benefits packages can be worth several thousands of dollars, making a big difference in the total compensation. If you had to purchase your own insurance or do not receive other benefits such as paid sick or personal leave, it could mean bringing home less money than a nurse who works in a position that offers those perks.


PAST 5-YEAR SALARY GROWTH FOR THE 7 MAIN TYPES OF NURSES

The opportunity for salary growth is something everyone should consider when choosing a career path. As we researched the seven main types of nurses and salaries, we found the following information about salary growth from the past five years.


1. Certified Nursing Assistant:

From 2016 to 2020, Certified Nursing Assistants experienced an increase of $5,230 in their salaries. In 2016, the average salary of a CNA was $44,840. The 19.50% increase in the past five years means a new average annual income of $50,090.

Year Average
Salary
Growth
Number %
2016 $44,840 +$810 +1.84%
2017 $45,710 +$870 +1.94%
2018 $47,050 +$1,340 +2.93%
2019 $48,500 +$1,450 +3.08%
2020 $50,090 +$1,590 +3.28%
Overall Growth in Past Five Years +$5,230 +19.50%


2. Licensed Practical Nurse/ Licensed Vocational Nurse:

Licensed Practical Nurse/Licensed Vocational Nurses experienced salary increases by 1.84% to 3.28% each year from 2016 to 2020, with an overall salary increase of 13.76%. In 2016, the LPN/LVN salary was approximately $44,480. That number increased by $870 to $1,590 each year until it reached $50,090 in 2020.

Year Average
Salary
Growth
Number %
2016 $44,840 +$810 +1.84%
2017 $45,710 +$870 +1.94%
2018 $47,050 +$1,340 +2.93%
2019 $48,500 +$1,450 +3.08%
2020 $50,090 +$1,590 +3.28%
Overall Growth in Past Five Years +$6,060 +13.76%


3. Registered Nurse:

In the past five years, the overall growth for Registered Nurse salaries has been 12.69%. This growth resulted in an increase in the average annualsalary of RNs from $72,180 to $80,010, a difference of $9,010.

Year Average
Salary
Growth
Number %
2016 $72,180 +$1,180 +1.66%
2017 $73,550 +$1,370 +1.90%
2018 $75,510 +$1,960 +2.66%
2019 $77,460 +$1,950 +2.58%
2020 $80,010 +$2,550 +3.29%
Overall Growth in Past Five Years +$9,010 +12.69%


4. Nurse Educator:

Nurse Educators are also among the types of nurses who have seen a pretty decent salary increase in recent years. The average Nurse Educator's salaryrose from $75,030 in 2016 to $84,060 in 2020, a growth of 14.91%.

Year Average
Salary
Growth
Number %
2016 $75,030 +$1,880 +2.57%
2017 $77,360 +$2,330 +3.11%
2018 $81,350 +$3,990 +5.16%
2019 $83,160 +$1,810 +2.22%
2020 $84,060 +$900 +1.08%
Overall Growth in Past Five Years +$10,910 +14.91%


5. Certified Nurse Midwife:

Since 2016, the average annual salary of Certified Nurse-Midwives has grown by nearly $22,000. In 2016, CNMs earned around $102,000, which was $8,780 more than the year before. In 2020, that number increased to $114,540, an overall increase of 23.43%.

Year Average
Salary
Growth
Number %
2016 $102,390 +$8,780 +9.38%
2017 $103,640 +$1,250 +1.22%
2018 $106,910 +$3,270 +3.16%
2019 $108,810 +$1,900 +1.78%
2020 $115,540 +$6,730 +6.19%
Overall Growth in Past Five Years +$21,930 +23.43%


6. Nurse Practitioner:

If you’re considering becoming a Nurse Practitioner and wondering how the outlook for income is, you will be glad to know, the possibility of steady and growing income is good. In the past five years, the average Nurse Practitioner salary has increased by more than 13%, with NPs earning approximately $13,250 more than they made in 2015.

Year Average
Salary
Growth
Number %
2016 $104,610 +$3,350 +3.31%
2017 $107,480 +$2,870 +2.74%
2018 $110,030 +$2,550 +2.37%
2019 $111,840 +$1,810 +1.65%
2020 $114,510 +$2,670 +2.39%
Overall Growth in Past Five Years +$13,250 +13.09%


7. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist:

Among the different types of nurses featured in this article, Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists have experienced the most significant pay increase earning nearly $29,000 more per year in 2020 than in the previousfive years combined. The total overall salary growth for CRNAs is 18.06%.

Year Average
Salary
Growth
Number %
2016 $164,030 +$3,780 +2.36%
2017 $169,450 +$5,420 +3.30%
2018 $174,790 +$5,340 +3.15%
2019 $181,040 +$6,250 +3.58%
2020 $189,190 +$8,150 +4.50%
Overall Growth in Past Five Years +$28,940 +18.06%


What Type Of Nurse Has The Highest Salary Growth In The Past 5 Years?

Certified Nurse-Midwives have experienced the highest salary growth percentage-wise, with a five-year increase of 23.43%. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists, however, have seen the most significant increase in wages earning $28,940 more in 2020 than they did in the preceding five years.

Why Past 5-Year Salary Growth Is An Important Factor To Consider When Deciding What Type Of Nurse To Become?

It is always a good idea to consider the past salary growth while deciding what type of nurse to become. When a specific job or specialty experiences salary increases, it is a good indication that there is a need for qualified individuals to fill positions in that field, which means job security is likely. As you research and consider the different types of nurses and the ones that interest you most, pay close attention to the growth trends, especially within the most recent five years.


FUTURE SALARY OUTLOOK FOR THE 7 MAIN TYPES OF NURSES

Choosing a career is one of the most important decisions you will make. You undoubtedly want to find a job that offers long-term stability and good income earning potential. Let us look at the future salary outlook for the seven main types of nurses in the United States.


Certified Nursing Assistant:

According to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics, medical support staff and unlicensed assistive personnel, like Certified Nursing Assistants, can see an increase in jobs by more than 12% from 2020 to 2030. Recent salary trends coupled with the increased need for qualified people in these positions strongly indicate that salaries will continue an upward trend.

Licensed Practical Nurse/ Licensed Vocational Nurse:

With an anticipated increase in available LPN/LVN jobs of at least 9% through 2030 and a nationwide shortage of nurses, the salary outlook for Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurses is favorable. With an average of nearly 61,000 LPN/LVN job openings expected yearly for the next decade, the increased need for nurses to fill these positions contributes to why the salary outlook for this type of nurse is promising.

Registered Nurse:

The demand for healthcare services, particularly nursing care, is higher than ever. Whether the demand is related to aging baby boomers, a retiring workforce, or issues like the COVID-19 pandemic, the need for qualified nurses cannot be overstated. With anticipated increases in the number of available jobs and comparing the previous five years' salary growth, the income outlook for Registered Nurses appears to be favorable. In fact, if current trends continue, RNs will likely see a salary increase of 2.54% annually over each of the next five years.

Nurse Educator:

Nurse Educators are essential to the future of nursing. Unfortunately, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing reports an extreme shortage of Nurse Educators. The deficit has resulted in thousands of prospective nursing students being denied entry into nursing programs nationwide. In response, the AACN uses resources to help secure federal funding to collect data on nursing faculty vacancy rates and identify strategies, such as increased compensation, to address and resolve the shortage. It is feasible to believe that the demand for qualified Nurse Educators means salary increases in the coming years. However, even if the salary growth is maintained at the same pace as the previous five years, Nurse Educators could expect a 2.99% increase yearly, giving them an average of an additional $12,566.97 per year by the end of the next five years.

The demand for workers in a particular field is a strong indication of whether they will experience growth in income. The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts a 45% growth in Certified Nurse Midwife, Nurse Practitioner, and Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist jobs through 2030. With the anticipated job growth and salary growth for each of these types of nurses, the following salary changes are likely in the next five years.

Certified Nurse Midwife:

From 2016-2020, Certified Nurse-Midwives saw a 14% growth in available jobs and a 23.43% increase in earnings. If the same trend continues, which is very likely given BLS predictions of job growth, CNMs could see salary increases of at least another $4,386 annually. This wage increase means Certified Nurse-Midwives could earn more than $137,000 annually by 2026.

Nurse Practitioner:

Nurse Practitioners in all specialties combined have had an average salary growth of 2.61% yearly since 2016, resulting in a yearly increase of around $13,250. While this number is not as high as the raises some other main types of nurses experienced, it is an average of $2,650 each year. If the salary growth for Nurse Practitioners remained at the same level as the previous five years, the average annual salary for NPs could reach $127,760 by 2026. The demand for services and projected growth for nurses in this role strongly indicate that they will see even greater growth.

Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist:

The highest-paid of the different types of nurses we have featured, the Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist, can expect an upward trend in salary growth of at least 3.6% each year. Based on previous growth records, CRNAs should earn at least $5,788 more yearly over the next five years, making their average annual salary more than $218,000!

What Type Of Nurse Has The Best Future Salary Outlook?

The types of nurses with the best future salary outlook are Certified Nurse Midwives, Nurse Practitioners, and Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists. The salary outlook is based on growth from the past five years and Bureau of Labor Statistics projections for job growth.

Why Future Salary Outlook Is An Important Factor To Consider When Deciding What Type Of Nurse To Become?

Considering salary outlook is essential for anyone choosing a nursing career path. Knowing whether a job has the potential to offer long-term security and good earning potential can help you determine if it is an excellent option to help you meet your personal, financial, and professional goals.



EMPLOYMENT, JOB OPENINGS & JOB OUTLOOK

(Below, you will find in-depth information about the current employment, job openings, and job outlook for the 7 main types of nurses in the United States.)

HOW MANY OF THE 7 MAIN TYPES OF NURSES ARE CURRENTLY WORKING IN THE U.S.?

The following is a breakdown of how many nurses are currently working in each of the 7 main nursing careers in the United States.


1. Certified Nursing Assistant:

More than 1.3 million Certified Nursing Assistants are currently working in the United States.

1,371,050


2. Licensed Practical Nurse/ Licensed Vocational Nurse:

Licensed Practical Nurse/Licensed Vocational Nurse account for 676,440 of the different types of nurses currently practicing in the U.S.

676,440


3. Registered Nurse:

Nearly three million Registered Nurses are actively practicing nationwide. This number includes RNs of all degree levels and across several specialties.

2,986,500


4. Nurse Educator:

There are presently 61,100 Nurse Educators working in the U.S., which supports reports of a shortage of these types of nurses.

61,100


5. Certified Nurse Midwife:

Certified Nurse-Midwives make up the smallest number among the different types of nurses featured in this article, with 7,120 actively practicing nationwide.

7,120


6. Nurse Practitioner:

Today, more than 211,000 Nurse Practitioners work in the United States. NPs may have a general family practice specialty or a more focused specialty such as mental health, pediatrics, or geriatrics.

211,280


7. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist:

Today, there are nearly 41,000 Certified Nurse Anesthetists working in the U.S. This number is expected to grow substantially with a projected job growth of 45% through 2030.

41,960


What Type Of Nurse Is The Most In Number In The U.S.?

Of all the main types of nurses in the United States, Registered Nurses account for 55.66% of the total, making them the most in number.

Why The Number Of Nurses Currently Working Is An Important Factor To Consider When Deciding What Type Of Nurse To Become?

There are a few reasons the number of nurses currently working is an important factor to consider when choosing a career path in this industry. Job satisfaction contributes to whether there are consistent numbers in any given field. Knowing if nurses in a particular field are happy with their jobs can give you an idea of whether that nursing job will offer long-term satisfaction. However, keep in mind that opinions vary as much as people, and you should choose a career path that fits your skills, passion, and life goals.


PAST 5-YEAR EMPLOYMENT GROWTH FOR THE 7 MAIN TYPES OF NURSES

The employment growth over the past five years for the seven main types of nurses in the United States ranges from a decrease of 2.98% to an increase of 55.28%. The following is a breakdown of the employment growth each specialty experienced.


1. Certified Nursing Assistant:

Although Certified Nursing Assistants earned more money in the past five years than in years before, the total number of working CNAs declined by 49,520 from 2016 to 2020, a -3.49% change.

Year Number of Employees Growth % Growth
2016 1,443,150 +22,580 +1.59%
2017 1,453,670 +10,520 +0.73%
2018 1,450,960 -2,710 -0.19%
2019 1,419,920 -31,040 -2.14%
2020 1,371,050 -48,870 -3.44%
Overall Growth in Five Years -49,520 -3.49%


2. Licensed Practical Nurse/ Licensed Vocational Nurse:

There were 21,070 fewer Licensed Practical Nurse/Licensed Vocational Nurses in 2020 than in 2016. Changes in nurse-to-patient ratio laws and the number of LPN/LVNs transitioning to Registered Nurse roles may be a few contributing factors to the decreased number of Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurses.

Year Number of Employees Growth % Growth
2016 702,400 +5,150 +0.74%
2017 702,700 +300 +0.04%
2018 701,690 -1,010 -0.14%
2019 697,510 -4,180 -0.60%
2020 676,440 -21,070 -3.02%
Overall Growth in Five Years -20,810 -2.98%


3. Registered Nurse:

Registered Nurses have increased by 8.76% in the past five years. In 2016, the nation had more than 2.8 million RNs practicing. That number grew to nearly three million in 2020.

Year Number of Employees Growth % Growth
2016 2,857,180 +111,270 +4.05%
2017 2,906,840 +49,660 +1.74%
2018 2,951,960 +45,120 +1.55%
2019 2,982,280 +30,320 +1.03%
2020 2,986,500 +4,220 +0.14%
Overall Growth in Five Years +240,590 +8.76%


4. Nurse Educator:

The number of Nurse Educators in the U.S. increased by 3,710 from 2016 and 2020. There was a slight decrease between 2016 and 2017. However, numbers began to grow again in 2018, resulting in an overall 6.46% in Nurse Practitioners in the previous five years.

Year Number of Employees Growth % Growth
2016 56,210 -1,180 -2.06%
2017 55,580 -630 -1.12%
2018 55,710 +130 +0.23%
2019 59,680 +3,970 +7.13%
2020 61,100 +1,420 +2.38%
Overall Growth in Five Years +3,710 +6.46%


5. Certified Nurse Midwife:

Although Certified Nurse-Midwives saw an increase in numbers in three of the past five years, the total number of CNMs decreased by 4.17%. The most significant change in numbers occurred in 2016, with a loss of 1,160 Certified Nurse-Midwives.

Year Number of Employees Growth % Growth
2016 6,270 -1,160 -15.61%
2017 6,530 +260 +4.15%
2018 6,250 -280 -4.29%
2019 6,930 +680 +10.88%
2020 7,120 +190 +2.74%
Overall Growth in Five Years -310 -4.17%


6. Nurse Practitioner:

The role of the Nurse Practitioner has become more diverse, with these types of nurses having several specialty options from which to choose. Increased autonomy has made this a more sought-after role among many nurses and is evident by an increase of more than 75,000 new Nurse Practitioners since 2016.

Year Number of Employees Growth % Growth
2016 150,230 +14,170 +10.41%
2017 166,280 +16,050 +10.68%
2018 179,650 +13,370 +8.04%
2019 200,600 +20,950 +11.66%
2020 211,280 +10,680 +5.32%
Overall Growth in Five Years +75,220 +55.28%


7. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist:

Another one of our featured main types of nurses in the United States, Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists, is seeing growth patterns, as well. Despite a 3.7 percent decline in numbers in 2020, CRNAs have increased by 6.4 percent, with 2,550 more Certified Registered NurseAnesthetists working in the field today than there were five years ago.

Year Number of Employees Growth % Growth
2016 39,860 +450 +1.14%
2017 42,620 +2,760 +6.92%
2018 43,520 +900 +2.11%
2019 43,570 +50 +0.11%
2020 41,960 -1,610 -3.70%
Overall Growth in Five Years +2,550 +6.47%


What Type Of Nurse Has The Highest Employment Growth In The Past 5 Years?

In the past five years, Nurse Practitioners saw the highest employment growth. These types of nurses grew from 200,600 to 211,280, a difference of 75,220 new nurse practitioners at a growth rate of 55.28%.

Why The Past 5-Year Employment Growth Is An Important Factor To Consider When Deciding What Type Of Nurse To Become?

Examining trends in employment growth opportunities is an excellent way to gauge whether the career that interests you has potential for long-term security. One great thing about nursing is that there will always be a need for healthcare services and professionals to provide those services. As you research the different types of nurses and salaries, it is good to consider which type had an overall growth in numbers and a steady rise in pay, both of which indicate a promising option for a career path.


ANNUAL JOB OPENINGS FOR THE 7 MAIN TYPES OF NURSES

The number of annual job openings experienced in any field is a good indicator of those most likely to experience job security and/or opportunities for advancement. The following are the annual job openings for the 7 main types of nurses in the United States including both new and replacement jobs.


1. Certified Nursing Assistant:

Certified Nursing Assistants typically see around 187,000 annual job openings. These positions are in various settings and include more than 175,000 replacement jobs.

New Jobs Replacement
Jobs
Annual Job Openings
(New + Replacement)
11,530 175,470 187,000


2. Licensed Practical Nurse/ Licensed Vocational Nurse:

There are about 6,380 new job openings for Licensed Practical Nurse/Licensed Vocational Nurses nationwide. Approximately 54,000 of the nearly 61,000 total job openings are replacement jobs, some left vacant by retiring nurses or those who choose other career paths.

New Jobs Replacement
Jobs
Annual Job Openings
(New + Replacement)
6,380 54,320 60,700


3. Registered Nurse:

Registered Nurses see an average of 194,500 annual job openings. Fourteen percent or 27,680 of these jobs are new positions, while the other eighty-six percent are replacement jobs.

New Jobs Replacement
Jobs
Annual Job Openings
(New + Replacement)
27,680 166,820 194,500


4. Nurse Educator:

There are approximately 9,000 new and replacement jobs for Nurse Educators annually in the U.S. Like all the main types of nurses featured in this article, most of the openings are replacement positions.

New Jobs Replacement
Jobs
Annual Job Openings
(New + Replacement)
1,630 7,370 9,000


5. Certified Nurse Midwife:

As more people begin to use the services of Certified Nurse-Midwives, this type of nurse is seeing an increase of about five hundred new jobs each year. While around four hundred twenty are replacement positions, there are generally at least eighty new jobs annually.

New Jobs Replacement
Jobs
Annual Job Openings
(New + Replacement)
80 420 500


6. Nurse Practitioner:

Nurse Practitioners are also seeing steady growth in their field, with 26,000 annual job openings. The number of new and replacement jobs for NPs is a little closer than the other main types of nurses. Eleven thousand four hundred ninety of the openings are new positions, and 14,510 are replacement job opportunities.

New Jobs Replacement
Jobs
Annual Job Openings
(New + Replacement)
11,490 14,510 26,000


7. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist:

While Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists show the second smallest number of new jobs, their specialty does continue to grow steadily. There are approximately 2,900 new and replacement opportunities for CRNAs each year.

New Jobs Replacement
Jobs
Annual Job Openings
(New + Replacement)
560 2,340 2,900


What Type Of Nurse Has The Highest Number Of Annual Job Openings?

Registered Nurses have the highest number of annual job openings with nearly 195,000 new and replacement jobs. Several factors can be attributed to the need for RNs. In addition to the number of nurses who retire each year, there is an aging population with many acute and chronic health problems and increased awareness of the importance of preventive health measures.

Why Annual Job Openings Is An Important Factor To Consider When Deciding What Type Of Nurse To Become?

The number of annual job openings among the different types of nurses is one of the tell-tale signs of whether future employment opportunities are likely to become available. For example, Registered Nurses had an 8.76 percent increase in job growth in the past five years and saw an average of nearly 195,000 job openings each year. This includes 166,820 replacement positions and 27,680 new positions, indicating a strong likelihood that someone considering a career as a Registered Nurse will be able to find employment.


10-YEAR JOB OUTLOOK FOR THE 7 MAIN TYPES OF NURSES

Making plans to pursue a career path means considering several things. One crucial factor is whether your career choice provides long-term job security. Here is a look at the ten-year job outlook for the seven main types of nurses.


1. Certified Nursing Assistant:

Certified Nursing Assistants are expected to see an 8.26% increase in jobs through 2030. This amount of growth will result in at least 115,300 additional CNA jobs.

Employment
in 2020
Projected
Employment in 2030
New Employment
Growth (2020-2030)
Number %
1,396,700 1,512,000 +115,300 +8.26%


2. Licensed Practical Nurse/ Licensed Vocational Nurse:

The number of Licensed Practical Nurse/Licensed Vocational Nurses in the United States is projected to grow by 63,800 in the next decade. This is a 9.27% job growth in ten years.

Employment
in 2020
Projected
Employment in 2030
New Employment
Growth (2020-2030)
Number %
688,100 751,900 +63,800 +9.27%


3. Registered Nurse:

Registered Nurses will remain one of the fastest-growing types of nurses for the next ten years. The projected growth in numbers is expected to be near 277,000, a 9.00% increase.

Employment
in 2020
Projected
Employment in 2030
New Employment
Growth (2020-2030)
Number %
3,080,100 3,356,800 +276,800 +8.99%


4. Nurse Educator:

Based on U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data, the number of Nurse Educators will increase by 16,300, with nearly 89,000 Nurse Educators employed by 2030. These numbers represent a significant growth rate of 22.45%.

Employment
in 2020
Projected
Employment in 2030
New Employment
Growth (2020-2030)
Number %
72,600 88,900 +16,300 +22.45%


5. Certified Nurse Midwife:

Although Certified Nurse-Midwives do not have the lowest ten-year job growth projection among the kinds of nurses featured in this article, they are expected to see the least number of new nurses in their field. By 2030, the BLS predicts there will be 8,200 CNMs nationwide, a growth of approximately eight hundred.

Employment
in 2020
Projected
Employment in 2030
New Employment
Growth (2020-2030)
Number %
7,300 8,200 +800 +10.96%


6. Nurse Practitioner:

On the other hand, Nurse Practitioners can anticipate a more than fifty percent increase in their numbers over the next decade. These nurses areprojected to see a growth of nearly 115,000 new positions by 2030.

Employment
in 2020
Projected
Employment in 2030
New Employment
Growth (2020-2030)
Number %
220,300 335,200 +114,900 +52.16%


7. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist:

Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists will continue to see a steady rise within their specialty. The 44,200 CRNAs employed in 2020 can anticipatehaving at least 5,600 new colleagues nationwide by 2030, increasing 12.67%.

Employment
in 2020
Projected
Employment in 2030
New Employment
Growth (2020-2030)
Number %
44,200 49,800 +5,600 +12.67%


What Type Of Nurse Has The Highest 10-Year Job Outlook?

When comparing the number of new jobs expected to be added to the different types of nurses, Registered Nurses has the highest ten-year job outlook, expecting more than 276,800 new RNs by 2030. On the other hand, with percentage growth, Nurse Practitioners have the highest ten-year job growth outlook, with predictions of a 52.16% increase in NP jobs.

Why 10-Year Job Outlook Is An Important Factor To Consider When Deciding What Type Of Nurse To Become?

Individuals making personal and professional plans or goals should understand the importance of the long-term effect their choices can have on their lives. When deciding what type of nurse to become, looking at the ten-year job outlook is an excellent way to determine the stability of a job within a particular market, in this case, the healthcare industry. If you know the likelihood of job growth is good, that indicates that your job will remain available to you instead of worrying about the role being eliminated.



HIGHEST PAYING WORKPLACES, STATES & METROS

(Below, you will find information about the highest paying workplaces, states, and metros for the 7 main types of nurses in the United States.)

WORKPLACES PAYING THE HIGHEST SALARIES FOR THE 7 MAIN TYPES OF NURSES

Once you decide the type of nursing job you want to pursue, the next step is to research where you can find a job in that role. The following are the workplaces that pay the highest salaries for each of the 7 main types of nurses.


1. Certified Nursing Assistant:

The highest paying Nursing Assistant jobs pay between $38,420 and $49,250 annually. Outpatient Care Centers and Scientific Research and Development Service rank numbers four and five among the top five paying jobs. Junior Colleges offer the highest paying jobs, with CNAs earning an average of $23.68 per hour or $49,250 yearly.

Rank Workplace Hourly Monthly Annual
1 Junior Colleges $23.68 $4,104 $49,250
2 Colleges, Universities, and Professional Schools $21.57 $3,739 $44,870
3 Federal Executive Branch $19.81 $3,684 $41,210
4 Scientific Research and Development Services $19.05 $3,302 $39,630
5 Outpatient Care Centers $18.47 $3,202 $38,420


2. Licensed Practical Nurse/ Licensed Vocational Nurse:

Licensed Practical Nurse/Licensed Vocational Nurses earn the highest salaries at Junior Colleges and in Outpatient Care Centers with incomes of $60,570 and $56,320, respectively, on average. Insurance Carriers, Religious Organizations, and Scientific Research and Development Servicespay some of the highest LPN/LVN salaries ranging from $54,490 to $56,260.

Rank Workplace Hourly Monthly Annual
1 Junior Colleges $29.12 $5,047 $60,570
2 Outpatient Care Centers $27.08 $4,693 $56,320
3 Insurance Carriers $27.05 $4,688 $56,260
4 Religious Organizations $26.49 $4,591 $55,100
5 Scientific Research and Development Services $26.20 $4,540 $54,490


3. Registered Nurse:

Business Support Services currently offer the highest-paying Registered Nurse wages. Federal Executive Branches and Pharmaceutical/Medical Manufacturing are also among the top places for RN salaries. The fivehighest-paying Registered Nurse jobs pay between $89,490 and $106,670.

Rank Workplace Hourly Monthly Annual
1 Business Support Services $51.28 $8,889 $106,670
2 Federal Executive Branch $46.26 $8,019 $96,230
3 Pharmaceutical and Medicine Manufacturing $44.29 $7,675 $92,110
4 Other Investment Pools and Funds $44.23 $7,658 $91,990
5 Office Administrative Services $43.02 $7,457 $89,490


4. Nurse Educator:

Nurse Educators fill roles in various educational and medical/hospital settings. The highest incomes for Nurse Educators come from General Medical & Surgical Hospitals and Psychiatric & Substance Abuse Hospitals. Local governments, business schools, colleges, universities, and professional schools also rank among the top five high-paying nurseeducator jobs sources. These jobs range from $84,320 to $119,050 annually.

Rank Workplace Hourly Monthly Annual
1 General Medical and Surgical Hospitals $57.24 $9,920 $119,050
2 Psychiatric and Substance Abuse Hospitals $45.88 $7,952 $95,430
3 Local Government, excluding Schools and Hospitals $43.75 $7,582 $90,990
4 Business Schools and Computer and Management Training $43.31 $7,506 $90,080
5 Colleges, Universities, and Professional Schools $40.54 $7,026 $84,320


5. Certified Nurse Midwife:

Certified Nurse-Midwives earn generous six-figure incomes in most settings. The highest-paid CNMs work for local governments, making more than $158,000 annually. Outpatient care centers, physicians' offices, general medical and surgical hospitals, colleges, universities, and professional schools also rank the highest paying employers for these nurses.

Rank Workplace Hourly Monthly Annual
1 Local Government, Excluding Schools and Hospitals $76.06 $13,184 $158,210
2 Outpatient Care Centers $68.28 $11,834 $142,010
3 Offices of Physicians $55.98 $9,703 $116,440
4 General Medical and Surgical Hospitals $53.57 $9,285 $111,420
5 Colleges, Universities, and Professional Schools $51.51 $8,927 $107,130


6. Nurse Practitioner:

The highest paying workplaces for Nurse Practitioners include Community Food and Housing and Emergency or Other Relief Services, where NPs can make nearly $12,000 each month. Religious organizations, mental health and substance abuse facilities, residential intellectual and developmental disability facilities, social advocacy organizations, and outpatient care centers are among the top-paying workplaces for NPs. Nurse Practitionersmake between $123,850 and $131,710 yearly in these settings.

Rank Workplace Hourly Monthly Annual
1 Community Food and Housing, and Emergency and Other Relief Services $68.98 $11,956 $143,480
2 Religious Organizations $63.32 $10,975 $131,710
3 Residential Intellectual and Developmental Disability, Mental Health, and Substance Abuse Facilities $62.90 $130,830 $130,830
4 Social Advocacy Organizations $61.52 $10,902 $127,970
5 Outpatient Care Centers $59.54 $10,320 $123,850


7. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist:

Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists remain the top money earners among the seven main types of nurses in the United States. The employment types that pay CRNAs most include General Medical and Surgical Hospitals, Colleges, Universities, Professional Schools, Specialty Hospitals, Home Health Agencies, and Outpatient Care Centers. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists earn from $196,530 to more than $224,000 annually with these employers.

Rank Workplace Hourly Monthly Annual
1 Outpatient Care Centers $108.08 $18,734 $224,810
2 Home Health Care Services $101.28 $17,555 $210,670
3 Specialty Hospitals (Except Psychiatric and Substance Abuse) $96.74 $16,768 $201,220
4 Colleges, Universities, and Professional Schools $95.05 $16,475 $197,700
5 General Medical and Surgical Hospitals $94.49 $16,378 $196,530


STATES PAYING THE HIGHEST SALARIES FOR THE 7 MAIN TYPES OF NURSES

Geographical location has been one of the most influential factors in determining salaries for people, despite their career choices. Typically, the higher the cost of living, the higher the salary one earns. Additionally, some areas pay more money because the demand for services is higher. The following are the states that pay the highest salaries for each of the 7 main types of nurses.


1. Certified Nursing Assistant:

Massachusetts, Hawaii, California, New York, and Alaska pay the highest Certified Nursing Assistant salaries. Not surprisingly, residents in each of these states have remarkably higher living costs than anywhere else in the country. CNAs in these states earn between $37,160 and $42,500 each year.

Rank State Average
Annual Salary
1 Alaska $42,500
2 New York $40,620
3 California $39,280
4 Hawaii $38,650
5 Massachusetts $37,160


2. Licensed Practical Nurse/ Licensed Vocational Nurse:

Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurses earn the most money in Alaska, where the average LPN/LVN salary is $67,620. Also ranking in the top five for highest-paying states for Licensed Practical Nurse/Licensed Vocational Nurse are California, Massachusetts, Washington, and Nevada, with annual salaries ranging from $59,700 to $64,090.

Rank State Average
Annual Salary
1 Alaska $67,620
2 California $64,090
3 Massachusetts $60,400
4 Washington $59,780
5 Nevada $59,700


3. Registered Nurse:

In Alaska, RNs earn approximately $95,270 per year. Oregon, Massachusetts, and Hawaii also pay top dollar for Registered Nurses, with these states offering salaries that range from $96,230 to $104,830. RNs typically make the most money in California, where their wages are more than $120,000.

Rank State Average
Annual Salary
1 California $120,560
2 Hawaii $104,830
3 Massachusetts $96,250
4 Oregon $96,230
5 Alaska $95,270


4. Nurse Educator:

Nurse Educators in Connecticut, New York, California, Massachusetts, and Florida are the highest paid in their field. Florida ranks as the state that pays Nurse Educators the most; in this state, they make nearly $117,000 per year.

Rank State Average
Annual Salary
1 Florida $116,650
2 Massachusetts $106,950
3 California $106,420
4 New York $98,850
5 Connecticut $96,620


5. Certified Nurse Midwife:

Certified Nurse-Midwives are growing in popularity nationwide, evident by the variety in the states that pay them top incomes. CNMs in Minnesota, New York, and Mississippi earn between $123,600 and $127,960 per year, whilethose in Utah and California earn $133,680 and $159,590, respectively.

Rank State Average
Annual Salary
1 California $159,590
2 Utah $133,680
3 Mississippi $127,960
4 New York $125,780
5 Minnesota $123,600


6. Nurse Practitioner:

Earning salaries that range from $126,050 to $145,970 in the top-paying states , Nurse Practitioners remain in the top three for the highest income earners among the featured nurses in this article. The salary for these types of nurses averages $131,166, with California offering the highest pay of $145,970.

Rank State Average
Annual Salary
1 California $145,970
2 New Jersey $130,890
3 Washington $126,480
4 New York $126,440
5 Massachusetts $126,050


7. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist:

The average pay for Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists in the top paying states is $228,070. Connecticut, Nevada, Wyoming, and Wisconsin CRNAs earn between $217,360 and $231,520 annually, while Oregon snags the top stop paying $236,540.

Rank State Average
Annual Salary
1 Oregon $236,540
2 Wisconsin $231,520
3 Wyoming $231,250
4 Nevada $223,680
5 Connecticut $217,360


METROS PAYING THE HIGHEST SALARIES FOR THE 7 MAIN TYPES OF NURSES

There is as much diversity from one metropolitan area to another as there is from state to state when it comes to comparing the highest salaries for the seven main types of nurses. California, home to movie stars and a popular tourist destination, is where the metros offering the most money to five of our featured nurses can be found. Let's take a closer look at the metros that pay the most for each of the 7 main types of nurses in the United States.


1. Certified Nursing Assistant:

The highest-paying metropolitan areas for Certified Nursing Assistants can be found in California. From Sacramento to San Jose, Vallejo-Fairfield, Santa Cruz, and San Francisco, CNAs earn an average of $43,702. The metro area that offers the highest Nursing Assistant pay is the San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward area.

Rank Metro Hourly Monthly Annual
1 San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, CA $23.28 $4,040 $48,420
2 Santa Cruz-Watsonville, CA $21.13 $3,660 $43,960
3 Vallejo-Fairfield, CA $20.29 $3,520 $42,200
4 San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA $20.18 $3,500 $41,980
5 Sacramento--Roseville--Arden-Arcade, CA $20.17 $3,500 $41,950


2. Licensed Practical Nurse/ Licensed Vocational Nurse:

Anchorage, Alaska, and four metropolitan areas of California are ranked as the top five metro areas for Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurses to earn money. The pay ranges from $69,990 per year in Anchorage to $75,950 in the San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California metro area.

Rank Metro Hourly Monthly Annual
1 San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA $36.51 $6,330 $75,950
2 Santa Rosa, CA $35.97 $6,240 $74,820
3 San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, CA $35.83 $6,210 $74,520
4 Vallejo-Fairfield, CA $34.78 $6,030 $72,350
5 Anchorage, AK $33.65 $5,830 $69,990


3. Registered Nurse:

With average annual incomes of $140,944, five California metros rank the highest paying metropolitan areas for Registered Nurses in the United States. RNs in Salinas earn approximately $63.54 per hour or $11,010 monthly, equal to $132,160 annually. Registered Nurses in the San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward metro area earn an average of $71.73 hourly, $12,430 monthly, or $149,200 yearly.

Rank Metro Hourly Monthly Annual
1 San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, CA $71.73 $12,430 $149,200
2 San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA $70.61 $12,240 $146,870
3 Vallejo-Fairfield, CA $68.34 $11,850 $142,140
4 Sacramento--Roseville--Arden-Arcade, CA $64.59 $11,200 $134,350
5 Salinas, CA $63.54 $11,010 $132,160


4. Nurse Educator:

From the San Diego-Carlsbad, California, to the Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, Florida metros, Nurse Educators bring in an average income of $121,602 per year. Los Angeles, Long Beach-Anaheim, California, Savannah, Georgia, and Boston-Cambridge-Nashua, MA-NH metros pay between $112,400 and $120,040. Miami-Fort-Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, Florida, is the highest paying metro area offering Nurse Educators wages of about $146,000 annually.

Rank Metro Hourly Monthly Annual
1 Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, FL $70.19 $12,170 $145,990
2 Boston-Cambridge-Nashua, MA-NH $57.71 $10,000 $120,040
3 Savannah, GA $56.54 $9,800 $117,610
4 Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, CA $54.04 $9,370 $112,400
5 San Diego-Carlsbad, CA $53.83 $9,330 $111,970


5. Certified Nurse Midwife:

Among all the metro areas that offer high-paying positions, five California metropolitan areas pay Certified Nurse-Midwives more than any other area. The Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim metro area pays CNMs the most, with average salaries of more than $191,000.

Rank Metro Hourly Monthly Annual
1 Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, CA $92.04 $15,950 $191,440
2 Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, CA $82.21 $14,250 $171,000
3 San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA $80.71 $13,990 $167,870
4 San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, CA $77.94 $13,510 $162,110
5 Sacramento--Roseville--Arden-Arcade, CA $75.53 $13,090 $157,100


6. Nurse Practitioner:

Once again, California metros rank as the highest paying for another of our featured types of nurses, Nurse Practitioners. In these metropolitan areas, Nurse Practitioners earn an average annual salary of $165,412. The pay ranges from $152,640 in the Napa Valley to $188,070 in the Vallejo-Fairfield metro.

Rank Metro Hourly Monthly Annual
1 Vallejo-Fairfield, CA $90.42 $15,670 $188,070
2 San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, CA $85.48 $14,820 $177,800
3 Salinas, CA $74.67 $12,940 $155,310
4 San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA $73.67 $12,770 $153,240
5 Napa, CA $73.39 $12,720 $152,640


7. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist:

Wisconsin, Michigan, California, and Illinois are home to the highest paying metros for Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists. CRNAs in Springfield, Illinois, make approximately $235,860 each year, while those in Green Bay and Duluth, Wisconsin, earn $239,140 and $271,940.

Rank Metro Hourly Monthly Annual
1 Duluth, MN-WI $130.74 $22,660 $271,940
2 Ann Arbor, MI $126.39 $21,910 $262,890
3 Green Bay, WI $114.97 $19,930 $239,140
4 Vallejo-Fairfield, CA $114.65 $19,870 $238,470
5 Springfield, IL $113.39 $19,660 $235,860




WORKPLACES, STATES & METROS WITH THE HIGHEST EMPLOYMENT

(Below, you will find information about the workplaces, states, and metros where the highest number of the 7 main types of nurses in the United States are currently employed.)

WORKPLACES WHERE THE HIGHEST NUMBER OF THE 7 MAIN TYPES OF NURSES ARE CURRENTLY EMPLOYED

Knowing where the highest number of nurses are currently employed can give you insight into what opportunities await you once you choose which nursing path you wish to follow. Below is a breakdown of workplaces with the highest numbers of each of the seven main types of nurses in the United States.


1. Certified Nursing Assistant:

Of the nearly 1.4 million Certified Nursing Assistants currently employedin the United States, more than 1.1 million work in individual and family services, home health care services, continuing or assisted living facilities, general medical and surgical hospitals, and nursing care facilities. General medical and surgical hospitals and nursing care facilities employ the mostCNAs, with over 900,000 employed in these healthcare facilities.

Rank Workplace Employment
1 Nursing Care Facilities 527,480
2 General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 374,770
3 Continuing Care Retirement Communities and Assisted Living Facilities for the Elderly 151,540
4 Home Health Care Services 77,300
5 Individual and Family Services 40,850


2. Licensed Practical Nurse/ Licensed Vocational Nurse:

Nursing Care Facilities are the top employers of Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurses, employing close to 200,000 LPN/LVNs nationwide. Another 306,860 LPN/LVNs work in physicians' offices, home health agencies, general medical and surgical hospitals, continuing careretirement communities, and assisted living facilities for the elderly.

Rank Workplace Employment
1 Nursing Care Facilities 199,760
2 Offices of Physicians 88,300
3 Home Health Care Services 84,460
4 General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 80,820
5 Continuing Care Retirement Communities and Assisted Living Facilities for the Elderly 53,280


3. Registered Nurse:

The top five employers of Registered Nurses employ more than 2.3 million RNs. General medical and surgical hospitals are the top-ranked employer of RNs, employing close to 1.7 million Registered Nurses. The other 600,000 work in physicians' offices, home health agencies, outpatient centers, and nursing care facilities.

Rank Workplace Employment
1 General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 1,729,200
2 Offices of Physicians 192,300
3 Home Health Care Services 169,630
4 Outpatient Care Centers 150,380
5 Nursing Care Facilities 143,250


4. Nurse Educator:

The highest number of Nurse Educators work in colleges, universities, professional schools, junior colleges, general medical and surgical hospitals, technical and trade schools, business schools, and computer and management training. Among these settings, more than sixty thousand nurse educators are employed.

Rank Workplace Employment
1 Colleges, Universities, and Professional Schools 36,130
2 Junior Colleges 17,610
3 General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 4,550
4 Technical and Trade Schools 1,800
5 Business Schools and Computer and Management Training 310


5. Certified Nurse Midwife:

Certified Nurse-Midwives are found in the highest numbers in physicians' offices, outpatient care centers, colleges, universities, and professional schools and local governments, not including schools and hospitals. These top five employer types currently have close to five thousand CNMs employed.

Rank Workplace Employment
1 Offices of Physicians 3,050
2 Outpatient Care Centers 1,170
3 Offices of Other Health Practitioners 580
4 Colleges, Universities, and Professional Schools 110
5 Local Government, Excluding schools and Hospitals 80


6. Nurse Practitioner:

Offices of physicians employ the most nurse practitioners, with 101,220 actively practicing. The other top four types of employers who have hired the highest number of NPs have approximately 82,000 Nurse Practitioners working for them.

Rank Workplace Employment
1 Offices of Physicians 101,220
2 General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 49,920
3 Outpatient Care Centers 18,920
4 Colleges, Universities, and Professional Schools 6,970
5 Offices of Other Health Practitioners 6,170


7. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist:

Of the 41,960 Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists employed in the United States, ninety-eight percent are employed by colleges, universities, professional schools, outpatient care centers, general medical and surgical hospitals, or physicians and other healthcare practitioners' offices. Physicians' offices employ the highest number of CRNAs.

Rank Workplace Employment
1 Offices of Physicians 21,560
2 General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 14,030
3 Outpatient Care Centers 2,460
4 Offices of Other Health Practitioners 1,670
5 Colleges, Universities, and Professional Schools 1,290


STATES WHERE THE HIGHEST NUMBER OF THE 7 MAIN TYPES OF NURSES ARE CURRENTLY EMPLOYED

Florida and Texas consistently rank among the states where the highest number of the seven types of nurses are currently employed.


1. Certified Nursing Assistant:

California, Florida, New York, Texas, and Pennsylvania are the states with the highest number of Certified Nursing Assistants currently employed. Although these states have the highest number of actively employed CNAs,they only account for 3.02% of the Nursing Assistant population nationwide.

Rank State Employment
1 California 97,970
2 Florida 84,520
3 New York 81,440
4 Texas 75,690
5 Pennsylvania 71,880


2. Licensed Practical Nurse/ Licensed Vocational Nurse:

39.59% of the Licensed Practical Nurse/Licensed Vocational Nurses in the United States work in California, Texas, New York, Florida, and Ohio. These states are the top five employers of LPN/LVNs, with approximately 267,820 combined.

Rank State Employment
1 California 71,320
2 Texas 69,650
3 New York 44,440
4 Florida 41,560
5 Ohio 40,850


3. Registered Nurse:

Pennsylvania is home to 146,640 actively practicing Registered Nurses. The state ranks number five among the top five states for RN employment numbers. New York and Florida have a combined 361,680 RNs. Texas and California employ the most Registered Nurses nationwide with 219,330 and 307,060 RNs.

Rank State Employment
1 California 307,060
2 Texas 219,330
3 Florida 183,130
4 New York 178,550
5 Pennsylvania 146,640


4. Nurse Educator:

61,100 Nurse Educators are working in the U.S., 20,690 of whom are employed in either New York, Texas, Florida, California, or Ohio. These five states employ nearly 34% of Nurse Educators nationwide and have the highest number of Nurse Educators than any other state.

Rank State Employment
1 New York 5,100
2 Texas 5,040
3 Florida 3,980
4 California 3,510
5 Ohio 3,060


5. Certified Nurse Midwife:

2,580 Certified Nurse Midwives work in the states ranked as the top five CNM employers. Florida, Michigan, Georgia, and New York have 1,570 Certified Nurse Midwives combined, and California has the highest number with 1,010.

Rank State Employment
1 California 1,010
2 New York 460
3 Georgia 420
4 Michigan 350
5 Florida 340


6. Nurse Practitioner:

There are presently 211,280 Nurse Practitioners in active practice in the U.S. Of those, 31.74%, or 67,070, work in the top five employment states: California, New York, Texas, Florida, and Ohio.

Rank State Employment
1 California 15,100
2 New York 14,850
3 Texas 14,680
4 Florida 13,010
5 Ohio 9,430


7. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist:

More than fourteen thousand CRNAs are collectively employed in Michigan, North Carolina, Ohio, Texas, and Florida. Florida is ranked #1, employing the highest number of Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists with approximately 3,660 currently employed.

Rank State Employment
1 Florida 3,660
2 Texas 2,960
3 Ohio 2,880
4 North Carolina 2,790
5 Michigan 2,420


METROS WHERE THE HIGHEST NUMBER OF THE 7 MAIN TYPES OF NURSES ARE CURRENTLY EMPLOYED

The highest number of nurses are not found in one concentrated area but are in various metros across the United States. Of the seven main types of nurses in the United States, six are located in the greatest numbers in the New York-Newark-Jersey City, NY-NJ-PA metropolis. Here, we will look at the numbers in the top metros for each of our featured nurses.


1. Certified Nursing Assistant:

The top five metro areas to employ CNAs have an average of 42,610 Nursing Assistants working there. The Boston-Cambridge-Nashua, MA-NH metro comes in at #5 for the highest number of Certified Nursing Assistants, employing more than 27,000. New York-Newark-Jersey City, NY-NJ-PA employs the most,with approximately 84,340 CNAs working in this metropolitan area.

Rank Metro Employment
1 New York-Newark-Jersey City, NY-NJ-PA 84,340
2 Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, CA 39,590
3 Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, IL-IN-WI 37,030
4 Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington, PA-NJ-DE-MD 34,740
5 Boston-Cambridge-Nashua, MA-NH 27,350


2. Licensed Practical Nurse/ Licensed Vocational Nurse:

The most significant numbers of LPN/LVNs are spread nationwide from Texas to Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, and California. The highest numbers are in metro areas in New York-New Jersey-Pennsylvania and California, with Texas and Maryland ranking #3-5 for Licensed Practical Nurse/Licensed Vocational Nurses.

Rank Metro Employment
1 New York-Newark-Jersey City, NY-NJ-PA 34,270
2 Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, CA 29,230
3 Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, TX 16,040
4 Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington, PA-NJ-DE-MD 15,760
5 Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, TX 13,150


3. Registered Nurse:

The Boston-Cambridge-Nashua, MA-NH and Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington, PA-NJ-DE-MD metro areas are among the top five ranked metros for high numbers of registered nurses. These metros alone have a combined number of 132,610 RNs working in them. The top three metros, Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, IL-IN-WI, Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, CA, and New York-Newark-Jersey City, NY-NJ-PA, have nearly 400,000 RegisteredNurses, roughly 12.69% of the total RN population of the U.S.

Rank Metro Employment
1 New York-Newark-Jersey City, NY-NJ-PA 173,570
2 Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, CA 109,790
3 Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, IL-IN-WI 95,730
4 Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington, PA-NJ-DE-MD 70,350
5 Boston-Cambridge-Nashua, MA-NH 62,260


4. Nurse Educator:

More than nineteen percent of the Nurse Educators working today can be found in one of five metro areas. Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington, Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, and Chicago-Naperville-Elgin employ 5,090 Nurse Educators. The Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach metro has 2,140,second only to the New York-Newark, Jersey City metro, where there are more than 4,600 Nurse Educators.

Rank Metro Employment
1 New York-Newark-Jersey City, NY-NJ-PA 4,650
2 Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, FL 2,140
3 Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington, PA-NJ-DE-MD 1,860
4 Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, CA 1,630
5 Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, IL-IN-WI 1,600


5. Certified Nurse Midwife:

1,290 of the 7,120 Certified Nurse Midwives nationwide work in one of five metropolitan areas. Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach has the smallest number of the five metros with one hundred seventy CNMs. San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, CA, Boston-Cambridge-Nashua, MA-NH, and Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, CA employ seven hundred twenty altogether. New York-Newark-Jersey City, NY-NJ-PA metro has the highest number CNMs with four hundred Certified Nurse-Midwives in active practice.

Rank Metro Employment
1 New York-Newark-Jersey City, NY-NJ-PA 400
2 Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, CA 260
3 Boston-Cambridge-Nashua, MA-NH 250
4 San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, CA 210
5 Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, FL 170


6. Nurse Practitioner:

Once again, the NY-NJ-PA metro area that includes New York-Newark-Jersey City ranks as number one for the highest number of nurses employed in a specialty. This metro area has approximately 13,760 Nurse Practitioners. Four other metro areas are ranked in the top five with a combined total of 19,000 Nurse Practitioners. The NPs in these five metropolitan regions make up 15.5% of the Nurse Practitioner population nationwide.

Rank Metro Employment
1 New York-Newark-Jersey City, NY-NJ-PA 13,760
2 Boston-Cambridge-Nashua, MA-NH 4,950
3 Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, IL-IN-WI 4,760
4 Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, GA 4,740
5 Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, CA 4,550


7. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist:

More than six thousand eight hundred Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists can be found in five metropolitan regions in Florida, NY-NJ-PA, Michigan, IL-IN-WI, and Texas. The Houston-Woodlands-Sugar Land, TX area has 1,010, and the Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, Floridametro has the highest number with 1,740 Certified RN Anesthetists.

Rank Metro Employment
1 Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, FL 1,740
2 New York-Newark-Jersey City, NY-NJ-PA 1,660
3 Detroit-Warren-Dearborn, MI 1,350
4 Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, IL-IN-WI 1,060
5 Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, TX 1,010




STATES & METROS WITH THE HIGHEST JOB OPENINGS & JOB OUTLOOK

(Below, you will find information about the states and metros with the highest job openings and job outlook for the 7 main types of nurses in the United States.)

STATES WITH THE HIGHEST NUMBER OF JOB OPENINGS FOR THE 7 MAIN TYPES OF NURSES

New York, Texas, and Florida consistently make the list of the top five states with the highest number of job openings for the seven main types of nurses in the United States. California and Pennsylvania are commonly seen among top-ranking opportunities for various nurses. Additionally, Illinois, North Carolina, Ohio, Georgia, Minnesota, and Tennessee have made the "Top 5" lists of where our featured nurses should be able to find jobs. Let's take a closer look at how the numbers compare.


1. Certified Nursing Assistant:

Nearly sixty thousand Certified Nursing Assistants jobs are available each year in the five states: New York, Florida, Texas, California, and Pennsylvania. This means that 30.98% of the new and replacement CNA jobs each year can be found in one of these five states.

Rank State New Jobs Replacement
Jobs
Annual Job Openings
(New + Replacement)
1 New York 1,399 12,091 13,490
2 Florida 1,039 11,131 12,170
3 Texas 1,056 10,814 11,870
4 California 1,090 9,130 10,220
5 Pennsylvania 822 9,368 10,190


2. Licensed Practical Nurse/ Licensed Vocational Nurse:

LPN/LVNs see the highest number of job openings in the same states as Nursing Assistants. Licensed Practical Nurse/Licensed Vocational Nurse new and replacement jobs in the top-ranked states total around 27,720 each year.

Rank State New Jobs Replacement
Jobs
Annual Job Openings
(New + Replacement)
1 California 1,160 6,280 7,440
2 Texas 795 5,975 6,770
3 New York 996 4,254 5,250
4 Florida 589 3,981 4,570
5 Pennsylvania 487 3,203 3,690


3. Registered Nurse:

81,400 of the 194,500 Registered Nurse jobs that become available each year are in the top five ranked states. California has the most job openings yearly for RNs, with nearly 24,000 postings available. New York and Texas have a combined 33,400, while Florida and Pennsylvania usually see increases of 14,000 and 10,510, respectively.

Rank State New Jobs Replacement
Jobs
Annual Job Openings
(New + Replacement)
1 California 5,340 18,510 23,850
2 New York 4,923 11,987 16,910
3 Texas 3,621 12,509 16,130
4 Florida 3,053 10,947 14,000
5 Pennsylvania 1,897 8,613 10,510


4. Nurse Educator:

Ohio joins the ranks of states with the most annual job openings for Nurse Educators, with two hundred eighty new jobs each year. Texas, Pennsylvania, California, and New York have about 2,330 annual job openings. Of the approximately nine thousand new and replacement Nurse Educator jobs available each year, these five states account for more than thirty-five percent.

Rank State New Jobs Replacement
Jobs
Annual Job Openings
(New + Replacement)
1 New York 189 641 830
2 California 130 460 590
3 Pennsylvania 88 372 460
4 Texas 98 352 450
5 Ohio 43 237 280


5. Certified Nurse Midwife:

New York State currently reports the highest number of new and replacement job openings for Certified Nurse-Midwives, with about fifty positions each year. Illinois, Georgia, and Florida each need around thirty CNMs, and Minnesota has openings for about twenty annually.

Rank State New Jobs Replacement
Jobs
Annual Job Openings
(New + Replacement)
1 New York 13 37 50
2 Illinois 7 23 30
3 Georgia 9 21 30
4 Florida 9 21 30
5 Minnesota 5 15 20


6. Nurse Practitioner:

Nationwide, at least twenty-six thousand Nurse Practitioner jobs become available every year. Twenty-three percent of those jobs are in Illinois, Florida, Texas, California, and New York.

Rank State New Jobs Replacement
Jobs
Annual Job Openings
(New + Replacement)
1 New York 639 1,001 1,640
2 California 460 930 1,390
3 Texas 397 773 1,170
4 Florida 410 700 1,110
5 Illinois 254 506 760


7. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist:

Forty-four percent of the Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist jobs available each year are in Tennessee, New York, Florida, North Carolina, and Texas. The lowest number of new and replacement jobs among the top-five ranked states are in Tennessee and New York, where about one hundred eighty CRNA jobs need to be filled each year. The highest number of replacementpositions for CRNAs, a little more than five hundred, are in Texas.

Rank State New Jobs Replacement
Jobs
Annual Job Openings
(New + Replacement)
1 Texas 160 350 510
2 North Carolina 53 167 220
3 Florida 63 127 190
4 New York 62 118 180
5 Tennessee 51 129 180


STATES WITH THE HIGHEST JOB OUTLOOK FOR THE 7 MAIN TYPES OF NURSES

It's no secret; everyone wants to know what the job outlook is and where it is best for a job before committing to a career. The seven main types of nurses are expected to see the most growth in Colorado, Arizona, Utah, Georgia, and New York. Additionally, growth in the industry among these nurses should be seen in Nevada, Tennessee, South Carolina, New Hampshire, West Virginia, Florida, Wyoming, and California. The following data shows the top five states for job outlook and projected employment growth for each of the 7 main types of nurses in the United States.


1. Certified Nursing Assistant:

Idaho, Maryland, Arizona, Utah, and Colorado expect to see the highest growth for Certified Nurse Assistants through 2030. The average employment growth is expected to be 21.45% a year, with the addition of 14,080 CNA jobs by the end of the decade. Colorado exceeds the other four top-ranked states in both number and percentage growth, with a projected increase of 24.80% or 5,390 CNA jobs in the next ten years.

Rank State Employment
in 2020
Projected
Employment
in 2030
New Employment
Growth (2020-2030)
Number %
1 Colorado 21,730 27,120 +5,390 +24.80%
2 Utah 9,440 11,690 +2,250 +23.83%
3 Arizona 1,440 1,760 +320 +22.22%
4 Maryland 25,930 30,690 +4,760 +18.36%
5 Idaho 7,530 8,890 +1,360 +18.06%


2. Licensed Practical Nurse/ Licensed Vocational Nurse:

LPN/LVNs practicing in Nevada, New York, Idaho, Colorado, and Arizona can anticipate growth of 12,770 new jobs, an average increase of 21.35% annually. While Arizona should see a 28.96 percent increase, New York will experience higher numbers of new jobs for Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurses, nearly 10,000.

Rank State Employment
in 2020
Projected
Employment
in 2030
New Employment
Growth (2020-2030)
Number %
1 Arizona 3,350 4,320 +970 +28.96%
2 Colorado 5,680 6,870 +1,190 +20.95%
3 Idaho 2,550 3,070 +520 +20.39%
4 New York 50,880 60,840 +9,960 +19.58%
5 Nevada 770 900 +130 +16.88%


3. Registered Nurse:

Registered Nurses will have a 27.95 percent growth in numbers each year throughout the next decade with more than 96,000 new jobs. The highest percentage growth is expected in Arizona, where 21,620 RNs now work, and more than 7,500 jobs will be added. New York will see the greatest increase in overall numbers with the addition of more than 4,000 new Registered Nurse jobs.

Rank State Employment
in 2020
Projected
Employment
in 2030
New Employment
Growth (2020-2030)
Number %
1 Arizona 21,620 29,190 +7,570 +35.01%
2 Colorado 53,000 68,630 +15,630 +29.49%
3 Utah 23,410 30,000 +6,590 +28.15%
4 New York 199,870 249,100 +49,230 +24.63%
5 Georgia 77,460 94,880 +17,420 +22.49%


4. Nurse Educator:

From 2020-2030, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates Nurse Educator jobs will increase by 37.75%. According to data, Utah will see the highest percentage growth while Georgia will add the most new Nurse Educator jobs, more than four hundred forty. By the decade's end, thenumber of Nurse Educators should increase by at least 1,480.

Rank State Employment
in 2020
Projected
Employment
in 2030
New Employment
Growth (2020-2030)
Number %
1 Utah 370 570 +200 +54.05%
2 Georgia 1,100 1,540 +440 +40.00%
3 Colorado 1,270 1,700 +430 +33.86%
4 Nevada 130 170 +40 +30.77%
5 Tennessee 1,230 1,600 +370 +30.08%


5. Certified Nurse Midwife:

Colorado and Tennessee can anticipate a 29.67% growth in the number of Certified Nurse-Midwives between 2020 and 2030. These states rank just below South Carolina, New Hampshire, and West Virginia, expecting a 33.33% growth. While Colorado ranks number four in projected percentage growth, the state is currently considered to be #1 in the number of new jobs for CNMs that will become available within the next ten years.

Rank State Employment
in 2020
Projected
Employment
in 2030
New Employment
Growth (2020-2030)
Number %
1 South Carolina 30 40 +10 +33.33%
2 New Hampshire 60 80 +20 +33.33%
3 West Virginia 30 40 +10 +33.33%
4 Colorado 130 170 +40 +30.77%
5 Tennessee 70 90 +20 +28.57%


6. Nurse Practitioner:

Arizona, Colorado, Georgia, New York, and Florida are the top five states for projected new employment growth for Nurse Practitioners nationwide. While Arizona, Colorado, and Georgia will see higher percentage growths, New York and Florida will see the most significant number of new jobs, withat least 10,490 new NP jobs combined between the two states.

Rank State Employment
in 2020
Projected
Employment
in 2030
New Employment
Growth (2020-2030)
Number %
1 Arizona 1,670 2,520 +850 +50.90%
2 Colorado 3,040 4,400 +1,360 +44.74%
3 Georgia 6,260 8,850 +2,590 +41.37%
4 New York 15,480 21,870 +6,390 +41.28%
5 Florida 11,100 15,200 +4,100 +36.94%


7. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist:

Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists can anticipate at least a 30.77% increase in jobs in California, which ranks the state as #5 in percentage growth. However, California is likely to see the most significant number of new CRNAs, expected at least four hundred new jobs by the end of the decade. Arizona, on the other hand, comes in at #1, predicting a 50% increase in available CRNA jobs by 2030.

Rank State Employment
in 2020
Projected
Employment
in 2030
New Employment
Growth (2020-2030)
Number %
1 Arizona 100 150 +50 +50.00%
2 Idaho 660 880 +220 +33.33%
3 Wyoming 30 40 +10 +33.33%
4 Colorado 350 460 +110 +31.43%
5 California 1,300 1,700 +400 +30.77%



Apart From The Salary, Job Outlook, And Job Openings, What Are The Other Factors Should You Consider When Deciding What Type Of Nurse To Become?


While salary and employment opportunities are at the top of the list of things to consider when deciding what type of nurse to become, other things are important. The following are six factors to consider as you research and select among the different types of nurses.

1. What level of education have you achieved or are you willing to pursue?

There are nursing jobs for people of all education levels and backgrounds. For example, if you have a high school diploma or GED but no college credits and do not wish to enroll in a college or university, you may find that becoming a Certified Nurse Assistant is a good option for you. LPN/LVNs can earn their credentials in less time than a Registered Nurse, but in more time than it takes to become a CNA. Other nurses may be required to earn a graduate degree such as a master's or doctorate in nursing.

2. What are you passionate about?

Perhaps you have heard it said, “Diversity is what makes the world interesting.” That statement can certainly be applied to nursing. Some people are passionate about teaching others and could find becoming a Nurse Educator rewarding. Others prefer to work with some independence but wish to provide hands-on care to patients. For them, the role of a Nurse Practitioner could be a perfect fit.

3. How important is income in helping you meet your personal and financial goals?

In a perfect world, no one would have to worry about money or whether they could afford the things they want and need. Unfortunately, we do not live in a perfect world. Consider the things you hope to accomplish personally and how your finances will factor into your ability to make that happen. Then compare the types of nursing jobs and potential salaries to help you decide which will better serve your goals.

4. Do you have commitments/responsibilities aside from work that you cannot negotiate or give up?

If so, that's not a bad thing. However, some jobs require more flexibility than others. For example, some types of nurses, like CNAs, LPN/LVNs, and RNs, may be required to work nights, weekends, or holidays. Certified Nurse-Midwives, Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists, and Nurse Practitioners may need to rotate weekend call or be on standby for emergencies with their patients. Carefully consider your obligations as you try to choose a career path.

5. Do you have a preference for the setting where you would like to work?

For example, Nurse Educators work in colleges, universities, and healthcare facilities. Certified Nurse-Midwives and Nurse Practitioners typically work in private practices or physicians' offices. Knowing the environment where you'd like to work can help narrow your choices.

6. How technologically advanced are you?

While most healthcare facilities have transitioned to electronic health records and digital equipment, some nursing jobs may require you to be more experienced with computers or other equipment than others. If you prefer a job that involves the use of technology you are unfamiliar with, don't fret. There are plenty of classes and on-the-job training for people like you who want to grow their skillsets.


My Final Thoughts


Are you one of the people who wondered, “What are the main types of nurses and salaries in 2022?” If so, it is my hope that this article has given you some better insight into the options you have and the main types of nurses and salaries available. Now that you know the 7 main types of nurses and salaries in 2022, you can decide which of these, if any, interests you. I encourage you to pursue your goal of becoming a nurse. There is no time like the present to take the next step toward achieving your dreams!


Darby Faubion BSN, RN
Darby Faubion is a nurse and Allied Health educator with over twenty years of experience. She has assisted in developing curriculum for nursing programs and has instructed students at both community college and university levels. Because of her love of nursing education, Darby became a test-taking strategist and NCLEX prep coach and assists nursing graduates across the United States who are preparing to take the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX).