32 Great Jobs for Nurses That Want to Work With Babies and Kids


Written By: Brittney Bertagna, BSN, RN


Do you love children, and know that working with babies or kids is in your future? Maybe you’ve wondered what are some of the best jobs for nurses that want to work with babies and kids? Working in pediatrics is a passion and those who want to work in this specialty know it's a calling. There may be more jobs for nurses that want to work with children than you originally thought. Continue reading to learn about the 32 great jobs for nurses that want to work with babies and kids in 2023, many of which you may have never heard about.


Is It Hard To Find A Job For A Nurse That Wants To Work With Babies And Kids?


Nurses that want to work with babies and kids have plenty of opportunities to do so and should not find it too difficult to find a job of their interest. There are so many nursing positions available right now and if you are set on working with babies and kids, you will. Working with this population is not for everyone. Those who find it difficult to work with children typically do not stay in positions that require them to do so. Meaning, turn over could be higher in pediatrics as nurses will try and realize it is not for them. There are also a few certifications that you can obtain to show your interest in a pediatric position.

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Top 3 Advantages Of Being A Nurse That Works With Babies And Kids


Here are the top three advantages for nurses that want to work with babies and kids.

1. You become a specialized nurse.

Nurses have the potential to earn more money by specializing throughout their careers. When you handle many of the same emergencies in a narrow population like pediatrics you become an expert quickly.

2. More resilient patients.

You are working with the most resilient population that you can find and this can have a huge impact on how you feel about not only your job but also how you live your own life outside of work. Children have a mindset that is unstoppable and it tends to wear off on you.

3. More opportunities to impact someone's life.

Many pediatric patients with chronic conditions will be managing symptoms for the rest of their life. Because of shortened life spans from many congenital diseases, some pediatricians and pediatric trained doctors will continue to manage the treatment of rare diseases long into adulthood because of the complexities of each individual case. You can have a significant impact on their lives both personally and medically since children are so impressionable.


Top 3 Disadvantages Of Being A Nurse That Works With Babies And Kids


Here are the top three disadvantages for nurses that want to work with babies and kids.

1. More emotionally draining.

You are surrounded by children the majority of the day. Oftentimes, children are unable to regulate their own emotions which can lead to meltdowns and temper tantrums. They require much more focus and energy if uncooperative.

2. Family dynamics.

The family dynamics of a minor are much different than adults. Not only do you have the parents of your patient, but you also have their siblings and social obligations to contend with. Coordination and compliance can sometimes be more challenging.

3. There is less communication.

Depending on the age and disease process, the children you are caring for might have limited to no communication skills. And a baby's only means of communication is to cry. This will require you to use your critical thinking skills as well as observational data to determine when something is wrong and determine the appropriate way to fix it. You will be relying on non-verbal communication and your clinical knowledge to draw conclusions to do what is best for your patients.



WHAT ARE SOME OF THE BEST JOBS FOR NURSES THAT WANT TO WORK WITH BABIES AND KIDS?

(The following are 32 great jobs for nurses that want to work with babies and kids in 2023.)

1. Camp Nursing

About the Job:

Nurses who want to work with babies and kids can consider a position outside of a clinical setting such as being a camp nurse. There are many positions for nurses in general summer camps, sports camps, or medically specific camps. These are more flexible positions in that they are typically shorter contracted positions. The day-to-day work is similar to that of a school nurse in the sense of the population as well as medication administration. You will have free time throughout the day to explore with campers and provide nursing services to those in need.

Required Education, Licensure, Certification, & Experience:

Must be an RN and have nursing education from either a 4-year bachelor’s degree program or 2-year associate's program.

No additional certification or experience is required unless you are looking at a specific camp for children with specific disorders.

Who is a Good Fit for this job:

This is a great fit for someone who is looking for a change of pace or has the flexibility and ability to be away from home for extended periods of time. This will not provide the guaranteed income as other positions will, but will be a good fit if you are seeking something less formal and more flexible.

Earning Potential:

It is a really hard job to pinpoint a specific range due to its inconsistent nature. But nurses who want to work with children in a camp nurse setting can expect to make around $47,560 a year.

Hourly $22.87
Weekly $915
Monthly $3,960
Annual $47,560


2. Cardiac ICU (peds)

About the Job:

Nurses that want to work with babies and kids can specialize too! A cardiac ICU for pediatric patients is a very specialized department that cares for children with both acquired and congenital heart conditions. These can be the most critically ill children and will require great attention to detail and teamwork to provide the best quality of care.

Required Education, Licensure, Certification, & Experience:

Must be an RN and have nursing education from either a 4-year bachelor’s degree program or 2-year associate's program.

Additional certification required: CCRN Pediatric Certification programs will provide the right training and expand on your knowledge of pediatrics and cardiology. Typically, to gain this certification you will also need 2 or more years of experience prior to specializing.

Who is a Good Fit for this job:

This job will be a good fit for those who enjoy working in a fast pace and an acutely critical environment. Typically, most candidates need some type of cardiac nursing experience prior to working in this type of environment. You will be working with very sick children and will require mental strength outside of work to cope with the stress.

Earning Potential:

The salary of a nurse working in a cardiac ICU for pediatric patients is $53.17 an hour, $2,127 a week, $9,220 a month, or, $110,591 a year.

Hourly $53.17
Weekly $2,127
Monthly $9,220
Annual $110,591


3. Labor and Delivery Nurse

About the Job:

Within a hospital setting there are many jobs for nurses that work with babies and kids, such as a labor and delivery nurse. A labor and delivery nurse will be working alongside mothers before, during, and after the labor process. Labor and delivery nurses are responsible for providing care to the baby immediately after birth in some settings. As a labor and delivery nurse, you will monitor the vital signs of both the mom and baby in a clinical setting and must be ready for anything at any time.

Required Education, Licensure, Certification, & Experience:

Must be an RN and have nursing education from either a 4-year bachelor’s degree program or a 2-year associate's program.

Possible advancement includes a certification as a nurse midwife. Becoming a Midwife is one option for those who find a passion for this area of nursing and would like to advance their degree.

Who is a Good Fit for this job:

This specialty would be a great fit for nurses who are comfortable working in a fast-paced environment. Whenever a baby is born, there is a team of people who are going to be supporting the newborn. It is the labor and delivery nurse’s job to help navigate new and worried parents and provide the appropriate support and education. You will need to be compassionate and be able to handle difficult situations as not all birthing stories have happy endings. There is also the element of critical decision-making in this type of scenario, which would be ideal for those who are able to think quickly under pressure.

Earning Potential:

The average salary of a Labor and Delivery Nurse is $47.62 an hour, $1,905 a week, $8,250 a month, or, $99,043 a year.

Hourly $47.62
Weekly $1,905
Monthly $8,250
Annual $99,043


4. Lactation Consultant

About the Job:

The role of a lactation consultant entails working directly with women and their babies to support and manage breastfeeding while at home. You will be responsible for providing education and support to nursing mothers in your role as a lactation consultant, often while the mother is recovering from childbirth in the hospital. A position such as this may be found in a hospital setting working directly with patients or in an outpatient setting. In an outpatient setting, the group may be structured similarly to a support group and will provide general education to nursing mothers.

Required Education, Licensure, Certification, & Experience:

Though no nursing experience is required, it might benefit you and your patients if you have experience working in L&D or with newborns in some capacity like postpartum, or NICU.

Lactation Consultant Training Program (LCTP) will give you what you need to provide lactation consulting to mothers and babies in a different form of healthcare.

Who is a Good Fit for this job:

The position might be suitable for someone who enjoys learning new skills and working with mothers and babies. If you are looking for a change in role or pace, this might be the perfect opportunity.

Earning Potential:

$76,787 is the average annual Lactation Consultant Salary in the U.S.

Hourly $36.92
Weekly $1,477
Monthly $6,400
Annual $76,787


5. Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: NICU

About the Job:

Like the name mentions, you will be working with newborn babies. The difference between the newborn nursery and NICU is that in the newborn nursery babies are born healthy, during uncomplicated births. In the NICU babies are critically ill and require intensive care to return to health.

Required Education, Licensure, Certification, & Experience:

Must be an RN and have nursing education from either a 4-year bachelor’s degree program or 2-year associate's program. Within your program of study, I would suggest you explore internships and specialty rotations in a neonatal unit if you are set on working with this population.

Additional courses and training in neonatal nursing may also be required.

It can be extremely difficult to find a position in the NICU as a new grad nurse. If you know you want to end up in the NICU eventually but aren’t having luck with a NICU job right out of school? Maybe consider a job with relevant experiences like L&D, pediatrics, or newborn nursery.

Who is a Good Fit for this job:

This job is great for an experienced nurse who understands the role and is comfortable working with the most fragile patients. An understanding of how healthy babies behave would be helpful in many situations you will find yourself in, in the NICU.

Earning Potential:

NICU nurses can expect to make about $99,711 per year, however, this is very dependent on what state you work in and how specialized you become.

Hourly $47.94
Weekly $1,918
Monthly $8,310
Annual $99,711


6. Newborn Nursery

About the Job:

The newborn nursery is where you will find healthy babies who were born in the last couple of days or hours. A nurse in this department will monitor vital signs, track their intake/output, and help prepare new mothers and fathers for their trip home. These nurses work around the clock in the hospital setting, so shift times and length will vary depending on organization and unit demands.

Required Education, Licensure, Certification, & Experience:

Must be an RN and have nursing education from either a 4-year bachelor’s degree program or 2-year associate's program.

Who is a Good Fit for this job:

This is a great job for a nurse who loves working with very young babies, but is not yet experienced with higher acuity patients. These babies will be well developed and generally healthy. Working in a newborn nursery, you will also have a lot of patient turnover which will help keep your time management skills sharp. This may require more charting but is great if you like a fast-paced environment where you are getting new patients all the time.

Earning Potential:

Nurses who work in a newborn nursery will see a higher starting salary as it is a more specialized area of nursing. The average salary for these nurses is $90,649 a year.

Hourly $43.58
Weekly $1,743
Monthly $7,550
Annual $90,649


7. Orthopedics

About the Job:

Nurses who want to work with babies and kids and have a passion to work in orthopedics will have an even wider range of job opportunities. Within this specialty, you will be able to work in a hospital or in outpatient facilities. The main focus will be on injuries to bones, but can also be for congenital conditions that affect the skeletal system.

Required Education, Licensure, Certification, & Experience:

Must be an RN and have nursing education from either a 4-year bachelor’s degree program or 2-year associate's program.

ONC® Certification can give you the confidence to provide the highest level of care.

Who is a Good Fit for this job:

This will be a great job for someone who wants to specialize in one area of nursing. A position like this will be great for someone wanting to work with kids with both critical injuries as well as more minor injuries. This job can be a good fit for someone wanting to work in a hospital, where you can work on a specialized unit or for someone who wants to work in an outpatient clinic.

Earning Potential:

$96,259 per year is what nurses working with babies and kids in orthopedics can expect to earn but will vary from state to state and depending on what facility you will be working in.

Hourly $46.28
Weekly $1,851
Monthly $8,020
Annual $96,259


8. Pediatric Acute Care Nurse Practitioner

About the Job:

This might be one of the best jobs for nurses that want to work with babies and kids and who have a passion for learning and helping others. This position will challenge you daily as you are not only working with acute children of many different ages, but you are also working with a population of individuals who do not always understand what you are saying. In this position, you will provide direct patient care to children in an acute care setting, like a hospital or urgent care.

Required Education, Licensure, Certification, & Experience:

Must be an RN and have nursing education from either a 4-year bachelor’s degree program or 2-year associates program plus have an advanced degree that requires additional schooling.

Because this position requires an advanced degree, you will need to apply and attend a Master’s level nurse practitioner program with at least 500 hours in an acute care pediatric setting. Then you will be required to take the CPNP-AC Certification Exam as well as a state certification for whichever state you plan to practice in.

Who is a Good Fit for this job:

This is a great opportunity for a nurse to expand their knowledge base and understanding of pediatrics. This is great for nurses who have a constant thirst for knowledge and who want to further their education in the area of pediatrics. Becoming a nurse practitioner requires a rigorous school and clinical schedule. This is something to keep in mind when planning your career path.

Earning Potential:

$119,337 is the average annual Pediatric Acute Care Nurse Practitioner salary in the U.S.

Hourly $57.37
Weekly $2,295
Monthly $9,940
Annual $119,337


9. Pediatric CNA

About the Job:

A CNA is on the hospital staff and provides additional support to units in areas of direct patient care. A pediatric CNA will do these tasks within a pediatric unit and with a slightly different lens when compared to a CNA working on an adult unit. Some roles within this position may include transportation, wound care, feeding, documentation, gathering vital signs, stocking supplies, changing bedding, playing or reading with patients, or providing emotional support during medical procedures. This is a unique position in that you are able to work in a variety of places including home health, hospitals, outpatient facilities, research centers, and rehabilitation centers.

Required Education, Licensure, Certification, & Experience:

There is no college degree requirement and as long as you find an accredited training program you will be eligible to take the certification test. CNA training programs are available all over the country to help prepare you to take the official certification exam. Most training programs are 4 to 8 weeks in length.

In addition to this certification, if you are interested in furthering your pediatric skill set, there are other 1-2 day training courses available to best suit you for this position. If this seems like something you are interested in, I would recommend you look into a PALS course or a PEARS course in your area.

Who is a Good Fit for this job:

This is a great fit for someone with little to no experience and wants to get into the medical field. For someone specifically looking to work with children in a medical capacity, this would also be a great start. This would be a great way to get experience prior to a nursing program or a job to keep you in the healthcare field while you go to school.

Earning Potential:

Average Pediatric CNA salary annually is approximately $26,036.

Hourly $12.52
Weekly $501
Monthly $2,170
Annual $26,036


10. Pediatric Developmental Disability Nurse

About the Job:

A unique position for nurses that want to work with babies and kids is within the field of developmental disabilities. This job gives you the flexibility to work within different settings including schools, homes, healthcare facilities, and at camps or other special assignments. Usually, this type of position involves providing care one-on-one or within a small group, but varies case by case.

Required Education, Licensure, Certification, & Experience:

Must be an RN and have nursing education from either a 4-year bachelor’s degree program or 2-year associate's program. There is also an opportunity for a specialized certification, though not required by all employers.

Who is a Good Fit for this job:

This is a great position for someone who loves working with the developmentally disabled. Often a position like this is a good fit for a nurse who has experience with similar patients, but wants to make it more of their specialty. It can be challenging at times, but can also be the most rewarding. It’s unique in many ways, but may also provide a unique schedule that works for you and your family.

Earning Potential:

The average salary of a Pediatric Developmental Disability Nurse is $25.29 an hour, $1,012 a week, $4,380 a month, or, $52,603 a year.

Hourly $25.29
Weekly $1,012
Monthly $4,380
Annual $52,603


11. Pediatric Diabetes Nurse

About the Job:

Some may believe this is one of the top jobs for nurses who want to work with babies and kids. Others will disagree. This is a very specific population where you will only be working with children from birth to 18 years old in the area of endocrinology. This is a position that can be inpatient or in an outpatient clinic, but you will be working with children diagnosed with diabetes mellitus as well as type 2 diabetes. This condition is a lifelong disease and it is important that both the patient and caregivers are properly educated. This will be a huge part of the position.

Required Education, Licensure, Certification, & Experience:

Must be an RN and have nursing education from either a 4-year bachelor’s degree program or 2-year associate's program. At this time, there is no specific certification, but experience will always be helpful in seeking new employment.

Who is a Good Fit for this job:

This is a good fit for someone who has a deep understanding of the endocrine system and specifically with diabetes. This position will lack a variety in disorders, but is a great position to really get to know your patients and staff. You will likely work with the same families for years and can have a huge impact. As mentioned previously, educating the patients and family is extremely important and something to consider when looking into this specialty.

Earning Potential:

$91,197 is the average annual Pediatric Diabetes Nurse salary in the U.S.

Hourly $43.84
Weekly $1,754
Monthly $7,600
Annual $91,197


12. Pediatric Dialysis Nurse

About the Job:

The best jobs for nurses that want to work with babies and kids are ones that you will strive in. Because dialysis is such a specialized area of medicine, it is important that you consider the population you will be working with. A pediatric dialysis nurse will be working with children that require dialysis. You will get to know your patients very well as they are regularly scheduled. You will be responsible for monitoring vital signs, evaluating lab results, and performing dialysis across a wide range of ages. The roles and responsibilities will keep you busy and will be repetitive in nature.

Required Education, Licensure, Certification, & Experience:

Must be an RN and have nursing education from either a 4-year bachelor’s degree program or 2-year associate's program.

Though not required by many positions, it might be beneficial to get a certification through the Nephrology Nursing Certification Commission in your local area. This will provide more in-depth training and understanding of what you will be expected to do on a daily basis.

Who is a Good Fit for this job:

This is a great position for someone who enjoys getting to know their patients and having a schedule for the day. You will likely know what patients you are seeing and will be performing repetitive nursing tasks throughout the day. Those fascinated with the nephrology system will likely enjoy this position for a longer period of time.

Earning Potential:

Average Pediatric Dialysis Nurse salary annually is approximately $105,902.

Hourly $50.91
Weekly $2,037
Monthly $8,830
Annual $105,902


13. Pediatric Emergency Department

About the Job:

Pediatric Emergency Departments will keep you on your toes. Most pediatric emergency room visits are from trauma or injury, however, you will also see a lot of medical cases. This is a fast-paced environment and you have to be prepared for anything, both critical and mild conditions. You will have worried families and scared patients on a regular basis and will need to manage both the medical emergency and the emotions also associated with it.

Required Education, Licensure, Certification, & Experience:

Must be an RN and have nursing education from either a 4-year bachelor’s degree program or 2-year associate's program.

Additional Certifications: Certified Pediatric Emergency Nurse (CPEN)

Who is a Good Fit for this job:

This is a great place for someone who loves a fast-paced environment and dealing with a variety of ailments. There may be a patient with chronic issues or something acute. You will have patients from birth to 18 years and will be expected to have a good understanding of medication doses and differences in pediatric anatomy. This will be an environment where you will consistently be working with both children and their parents during an unpleasant time of their lives, so it will be a good fit for someone who can sympathize and empathize with others.

Earning Potential:

Nurses who work with babies and kids in the pediatric emergency department can expect to make around $100,939 per year but have the potential to make much more depending on years of experience and geographic location.

Hourly $48.53
Weekly $1,941
Monthly $8,410
Annual $100,939


14. Pediatric Flight Nurse

About the Job:

Top jobs for nurses who want to work with babies and kids will require highly skilled individuals to perform the given task. This is no exception. Being a pediatric flight nurse, you will be expected to respond at any given time and are typically caring for the most critical children. It is a high-stress environment that is not for everyone. Your days will be unpredictable and you will likely never have two similar patients.

Required Education, Licensure, Certification, & Experience:

Must be an RN and have nursing education from either a 4-year bachelor’s degree program or 2-year associate's program. This position also requires 3 years of current critical care experience. Because of the nature of the job, it is also required to hold many certifications. Here are some common certifications, but these can vary from state to state.

Common certifications are as follows:

BLS (Basic Life Support)
ACLS (Advanced Cardiac Life Support)
PALS (Pediatric Advanced Life Support)
PHTLS (Prehospital Trauma Life Support)
ITLS (International Trauma Life Support)

Who is a Good Fit for this job:

This is a great position for someone who has experience in critical care and has thoroughly enjoyed it. This is a high-stress position that would be great for someone who thrives in critical situations and who is able to think critically with limited resources available. Someone who doesn't like routine or gets bored in highly structured environments would likely thrive in this position.

Earning Potential:

The average salary of a Pediatric Flight Nurse is $40.01 an hour, $1,600 a week, $6,930 a month, or, $83,212 a year.

Hourly $40.01
Weekly $1,600
Monthly $6,930
Annual $83,212


15. Pediatric Forensic Nurse

About the Job:

Top jobs for nurses who want to work with babies and kids are highly specific like this one. Pediatric forensic nursing is not for the faint at heart. Because of the nature of the specialty, it might not surprise you that you will be working with children that have been victims of physical abuse, kidnappings, neglect, sexual abuse, and many other crimes. Your day-to-day will look very different from other pediatric positions in nursing. You will likely be dealing with more psychological factors, in addition to physical caretaking.

Required Education, Licensure, Certification, & Experience:

Must be an RN and have nursing education from either a 4-year bachelor’s degree program or 2-year associate's program. There is no required certification, however, if interested you can obtain a Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner’s- Pediatrics (SANE-P) credential.

Who is a Good Fit for this job:

This is a good fit for an experienced pediatric nurse who enjoys more than just the physical tasks of nursing. These patients will require more psychological attention as well and may be in difficult situations that you have no control over. This is an extremely difficult role to be in. This is a great option for someone who has enjoyed working with these children in another capacity and has found this to be an interesting area of specialty.

Earning Potential:

$65,047 is the average annual Pediatric Forensic Nurse salary in the U.S.

Hourly $31.27
Weekly $1,251
Monthly $5,420
Annual $65,047


16. Pediatric Home Care Nurse

About the Job:

Top jobs for nurses who want to work with babies and kids include jobs where you will work directly with patients and families in a family home setting. As a pediatric home care nurse, you will be working with a unique population of children as they often have additional equipment supporting their daily life. This can include patients that you would help manage their tracheostomies, g-tubes, or patients on ventilators. You can also expect to work with children with seizure disorders requiring around-the-clock care.

Required Education, Licensure, Certification, & Experience: Who is a Good Fit for this job:

Must be an RN and have nursing education from either a 4-year bachelor’s degree program or 2-year associate's program. There are no additional requirements at this time, but it is always recommended that you have previous experience working with this population.

Who is a Good Fit for this job:

Someone who loves working closely with families and being in a different setting with every patient. If this sounds like something you would love to do, there’s a special place for people like you and this job will likely be a good fit. Someone working in this setting should have a good understanding of children and love working directly with their families. You will also need to have great communication skills and a heart for difficult times.

Earning Potential:

Average Pediatric Forensic Nurse salary annually is approximately $60,530.

Hourly $29.10
Weekly $1,164
Monthly $5,040
Annual $60,530


17. Pediatric Hospice Nurse

About the Job:

Nurses who want to work with babies and kids can become pediatric hospice nurses. The majority of children under your care require 24/7 care but are able to continue living at home with their families. In your capacity as a nurse, you can deliver these services to children of all ages. It will be your responsibility to administer medication, provide physical and emotional support, and train others on the use and care of medical equipment. In addition to these tasks, you will offer families the support they need to take care of their children safely.
Hospice nursing is similar to home health in that most of the time the care is provided in the patient’s home, But unlike managing chronic conditions like you would see in home health, you are managing end-of-life care and everything that comes with the transition.

Required Education, Licensure, Certification, & Experience:

The candidate must be a registered nurse and have nursing education either from a 4-year bachelor's program or from a 2-year associate's program.

There are additional certificates nurses can earn in the area of pediatric nursing. While, most of the time, these certificates are not required to be considered for employment many employers will pay for continuing education certificates like this one if it is relevant to their job description. Additional information can be found on the Certified Hospice and Palliative Pediatric Nurse website. In order to earn this certification, 500 hours of experience is required.

Who is a Good Fit for this job:

An individual with experience in end-of-life care who has a strong desire to care for others at the end of life is well suited for this position. Specialists in this field are dedicated to caring for every aspect of a child's life. As a nurse, you will have the opportunity to offer support and guidance to loved ones during this difficult time. This is a good fit for someone who wants to make a lasting impact on the family.

Earning Potential:

The national average is around $75,329 per year for a pediatric hospice nurse.

Hourly $36.22
Weekly $1,449
Monthly $6,280
Annual $75,329


18. Pediatric Infusion Nurse

About the Job:

Nurses that want to work with babies and kids can work in pediatric infusion centers or in the homes of pediatric patients performing transfusions or infusions for a variety of reasons. Most infusion centers focus on treating chronic illnesses such as sickle cell disease or cancer and provide a comfortable space for children to come and get the treatment needed to extend their life. As a nurse, you will be working directly with the patients in providing this treatment while monitoring and managing associated symptoms.

Required Education, Licensure, Certification, & Experience:

The candidate must be a registered nurse and have nursing education either from a 4-year bachelor's program or from a 2-year associate's program.
Some states may require a Certified Registered Nurse Infusion (CRNI) certification. This would require a minimum of 1600 hours of experience with infusions and a certification exam.

Who is a Good Fit for this job:

This is a good fit for someone who likes routine and seeing the same patients over a long period of time. This can be a slower pace when compared to other nursing positions, but that’s not to say you won’t be busy. There will always be patients and the unique pediatric population will always keep you on your toes. This is a good fit for an experienced nurse who knows what to look out for when administering chemotherapy or one who has a strong will to psychologically help sick children.

Earning Potential:

The average salary of a Pediatric Infusion Nurse is $37.61 an hour, $1,504 a week, $6,520 a month, or, $78,231 a year.

Hourly $37.61
Weekly $1,504
Monthly $6,520
Annual $78,231


19. Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU)

About the Job:

A position in the pediatric intensive care unit requires that you have a good understanding of pediatric nursing. You will be working with children and adolescents from 0-17 years old. You will need to know a wide range of conditions and their individual impact on your patient. Some patients will be able to communicate and some will not. Regardless of their age, this is a unit that patients only go to when they need around-the-clock monitoring and are in critical condition.

Required Education, Licensure, Certification, & Experience:

Must be an RN and have nursing education from either a 4-year bachelor’s degree program or 2-year associate's program. If you are hoping to get a job in a PICU with little to no experience, within your program of study I would suggest that you explore internships and specialty rotations in a pediatric unit. Additional courses in pediatric nursing are also recommended.

It can be difficult to find a job in the PICU as a new grad nurse, so you will likely need to find the relevant working experience to be considered. Areas to look into are other pediatrics units, NICU, or newborn nurseries.

Who is a Good Fit for this job:

This is a great option for someone who thrives in a high-intensity environment. You will be working closely with critical patients from infants to young adults. These patients will be one of the most vulnerable of populations. If you like fast-paced work and high stress, and you want to work with children, this might be a good option for you. Something to keep in mind is the variety in medication dosages, differences in anatomy, and vitals because the age range is so variable.

Earning Potential:

PICU Nurse salaries can vary state by state, but you will likely see a number around $104,000 per year.

Hourly $50.27
Weekly $2,011
Monthly $8,710
Annual $104,555


20. Pediatric LPN

About the Job:

Working as a Pediatric LPN is a great option for nurses that work with babies and kids but do not have the qualifications to be an RN. Within this position, you will be working with patients as an RN would, however, have a slightly different scope of practice. In many states, you would not be able to administer IV medications as an LPN, however oral medications are within your scope.

As a Pediatric LPN, you will be responsible for pediatric patient care in a variety of settings and providing children with the support they need to effectively heal. You will be responsible for taking vital signs, educating families, and working alongside other medical professionals.

Required Education, Licensure, Certification, & Experience:

You must hold an LPN certification that can typically be obtained from a community college which typically takes about a year to complete the program. Along with the course work, you will also have training with hands-on clinical experience. To be able to be licensed and begin your career you will have to pass the NCLEX-PN as well.

Who is a Good Fit for this job:

As stated above, this is a good fit for someone who has an LPN certification in nursing from a community college and does not want to attend a nursing program to become an RN. This is also a great position for someone with limited medical experience who wants to personally verify this is what they want to do before becoming an RN or furthering their education in the medical field.

Earning Potential:

$52,035 is the average annual Pediatric LPN salary in the U.S.

Hourly $25.02
Weekly $1,001
Monthly $4,340
Annual $52,035


21. Pediatric Med-Surg Unit

About the Job:

A med-surg unit is for patients in the hospital who are less critical in nature, but still require hospitalization. This can be from appendectomies, orthopedic surgeries, or medical conditions like diabetes or renal failure. You will be dealing with patients 0-17 years old and the job will include more than just vital signs and medications. Within any hospital position, you will want to consider the schedule that you might have and how it will align with your life outside of work.

Required Education, Licensure, Certification, & Experience:

Must be an RN and have nursing education from either a 4-year bachelor’s degree program or 2-year associate's program. You can get additional certifications to work specifically with the pediatric population, but this can differ from geographic location and hospital. Depending on if your hospital has a dedicated pediatric floor or unit. It is always recommended if interested to seek further education and training.

Some general experience working with children will be helpful, but not required.

Who is a Good Fit for this job:

Someone who likes variety! You will see anything and everything here, especially if you are at a larger children’s hospital. A unit like this would be a great place to start if you are looking to move to a more critical unit and are set on working with children or babies. It seems there is always a need for pediatric nurses because of the nature of the job, so finding a job may not be as difficult on these units.

Earning Potential:

Average pediatric nurse salary in a med-surg unit annually is approximately $86,567.

Hourly $41.62
Weekly $1,665
Monthly $7,210
Annual $86,567


22. Pediatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner

About the Job:

As an advanced-level practitioner, you will have the opportunity to work directly with young patients and their mental health. There are a variety of illnesses that can be assessed, treated, and managed by Nurse Practitioners (NPs). As an NP you will be responsible for prescribing medications and treating children and adolescents suffering from psychological disorders in need of guidance and intervention.

Required Education, Licensure, Certification, & Experience:

Must be an RN and have nursing education from either a 4-year bachelor’s degree program or 2-year associates program to apply to the higher education program.

Because this requires an advanced degree, you will then need to apply and attend a 2-year Master’s level PMHNP program. This typically requires an average of 2 years of working experience in the specialty prior to obtaining your Master’s degree and will require supervised hours prior to taking a certifying exam.

Who is a Good Fit for this job:

Nurses that want to work with babies and kids could find their fit in the pediatric mental health space. This is great for someone who has the desire to expand their knowledge and obtain an advanced degree. There is a great need for individuals to impact our future generations and this is a great opportunity for that. Someone who has had experience in pediatric psychiatric facilities may also be a great fit for this position.

Earning Potential:

Average Pediatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner salary annually is approximately $121,965.

Hourly $58.64
Weekly $2,345
Monthly $10,160
Annual $121,965


23. Pediatric Neurology Nurse

About the Job:

This is one of the best jobs for nurses that want to work with babies and kids because of how unique the patients are. This position will give you the opportunity to work with children suffering from neurological disorders such as epilepsy or acquired conditions following a car accident or traumatic brain injury. Like many other positions as a pediatric neurology nurse, you will be responsible for monitoring vital signs, administering medications and depending on your setting will either be working with the patients immediately after or aiding in their rehabilitation in an outpatient setting.

Required Education, Licensure, Certification, & Experience:

Must be an RN and have nursing education from either a 4-year bachelor’s degree program or 2-year associate's program. General experience working with children will be helpful but is not always required.

You can get additional certifications to work specifically with the pediatric population, but may only be required hospital to hospital. It is always recommended if interested to seek further education and training.

Who is a Good Fit for this job:

This is a great position for an experienced nurse who has loved working with this population. It is a more specialized area of nursing, so it would be a good idea to know that this is a population you would truly enjoy working with.

Earning Potential:

The average salary of a Pediatric Neurology Nurse is $49.13 an hour, $1,965 a week, $8,520 a month, or, $102,200 a year.

Hourly $49.13
Weekly $1,965
Monthly $8,520
Annual $102,200


24. Pediatric Oncology Nurse

About the Job:

Nurses that want to work with babies and kids probably already know, that cancer does not discriminate against age. This is a position that will specialize in patients who have or have had cancer and everything that is included. You will be administering chemotherapy medication, you will be managing symptoms and pain, and you will be the support a child and family needs during extremely difficult times.

Required Education, Licensure, Certification, & Experience:

Must be an RN and have nursing education from either a 4-year bachelor’s degree program or 2-year associate's program.

You can get additional certifications to work specifically in pediatric oncology units, but may only be required by individual hospitals. We always recommended you seek further education and training if interested.

Certified Pediatric Hematology Oncology Nurse (CPHON®) programs will provide the training and education needed to hold a position in this specialty.

Who is a Good Fit for this job:

This would be a great position for someone who loves repetition and patient staff comradery. These are patients who you will be seeing for a long period of time and will be performing very specific tasks that are not seen within other departments. The variety in care is limited so keep that in mind, but should be considered for anyone who is looking to have a huge impact on the lives of children.

Earning Potential:

$120,000 per year is the average salary for a pediatric oncology nurse. It is arguably the highest-paying pediatric nursing position to hold.

Hourly $51.47
Weekly $2,059
Monthly $8,920
Annual $107,066


25. Pediatric Outpatient Surgery

About the Job:

Outpatient surgery centers are available for children who may require surgery, but do not need to stay in a hospital for full monitoring. This is where you come in. These surgery centers require a lot of hands-on care before, during, and after the procedures. You will be dealing with healthy children who may be required to undergo general anesthesia for dental procedures, or need a minor surgery that does not require a full hospital stay. You will be monitoring vital signs, managing pain, and educating caregivers on the next steps or potential warning signs to seek further evaluation.

Required Education, Licensure, Certification, & Experience:

Must be an RN and have nursing education from either a 4-year bachelor’s degree program or 2-year associate's program.

Who is a Good Fit for this job:

This is a good fit for a nurse that likes working with a very specific skill set. The clientele will be patients that are well enough for outpatient surgery but still require a serious procedure. You will thrive in this environment if you appreciate autonomy and caring for children pre and post-surgery. You will be monitoring vital signs and educating parents on what to expect and what critical signs would be to return to a medical facility.

Earning Potential:

Pediatric nurses that deal with babies and kids in outpatient surgery units are typically paid around $74,004 per year. This number can fluctuate depending on your employer and the types of surgeries they perform and the size of the company that a nurse works for.

Hourly $35.58
Weekly $1,423
Monthly $6,170
Annual $74,004


26. Pediatric Primary Care Nurse Practitioner

About the Job:

This is a top job for nurses who want to work with babies and kids because of the diversity of your patients and the variety in treatment. This is an advanced-level practitioner that will allow you to work directly with young patients in an outpatient setting. There are a variety of illnesses that can be assessed, treated, and managed by these Nurse Practitioners (NPs). As a pediatric primary care NP you will be responsible for prescribing medications and treating children and adolescents in need of guidance and intervention.

Required Education, Licensure, Certification, & Experience: Who is a Good Fit for this job:

Must be an RN and have nursing education from either a 4-year bachelor’s degree program or 2-year associates program prior to applying to the higher education program.

To obtain this advanced degree you will need to attend a 2-year Master’s Level Pediatric Primary Care NP program designed for training nurse practitioners and pass a certifying exam prior to being able to practice in your area. These requirements vary state by state.

Who is a Good Fit for this job:

This is a great option for someone who loves routine in their day and variety in their patients. Typically, you will be in an outpatient setting working with patients who are relatively healthy overall or have chronic health conditions. That being said you may also be treating a child with a complex medical history in need of multiple interventions and treatment plans.

Earning Potential:

$116,073 is the average annual Pediatric Primary Care Nurse Practitioner salary in the U.S.

Hourly $55.80
Weekly $2,232
Monthly $9,670
Annual $116,073


27. Pediatric Pulmonary Nurse

About the Job:

A nurse that works with babies and kids may be enthused to work with children who have respiratory disorders. Children requiring this type of care will need support in an acute setting, as critical care patients, with rehabilitation as well as preventative medicine. As a pediatric pulmonary nurse, you have the luxury of working in-patient or out-patient and may also have the opportunity to work in a variety of different units including the NICU, PICU, or general pediatric unit depending on your preference. Like other positions, you will be administering medications, monitoring vital signs, and managing ventilators.

Required Education, Licensure, Certification, & Experience: Who is a Good Fit for this job:

Must be an RN and have nursing education from either a 4-year bachelor’s degree program or 2-year associate's program. General experience working with children will be helpful but is not always required.

Who is a Good Fit for this job:

This is a great position for a nurse who would like to specialize and has found a love for the pulmonary system. This would be a good fit for a nurse who likes consistency in their patient population, but may also enjoy the unpredictability of an inpatient nursing shift. No two patients will be the same, but with the more narrow focus on the pulmonary system you may enjoy a position like this.

Earning Potential:

Average Pediatric Pulmonary Nurse salary annually is approximately $84,491.

Hourly $40.62
Weekly $1,625
Monthly $7,040
Annual $84,491


28. Pediatric Trauma Nurse

About the Job:

A very rewarding and one of the best jobs for nurses that want to work with babies and kids will be to work as a pediatric trauma nurse. It is one of the highest paying positions. This position will likely be in an emergency department that has a specialty level of care to serve the most critical patients. Within this position, you will likely assess, administer medications, and provide education to caregivers with regard to continued care. This is a fast-paced environment where you will be expected to think critically and rapidly.

Required Education, Licensure, Certification, & Experience: Who is a Good Fit for this job:

Must be an RN and have nursing education from either a 4-year bachelor’s degree program or 2-year associate's program. It will be required that you have additional certifications such as BLS and PALS.

It is also recommended to hold a Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP) credential and Emergency Nursing Pediatric Course (ENPC) certification for additional education and support within the department. This will make you a more desirable candidate if you have this prior to applying for a position, but it is not always required.

Who is a Good Fit for this job:

This is a great position for an experienced pediatric nurse who enjoys the unpredictability of a fast-paced working environment. It will be a great position for someone who likes the physical and mental challenge of critical thinking and patient management. You will be dealing with children in critical conditions which may play a role in your mental health and is always something to consider.

Earning Potential:

The average salary of a Pediatric Trauma Nurse is $42.49 an hour, $1,699 a week, $7,360 a month, or, $88,373 a year.

Hourly $42.49
Weekly $1,699
Monthly $7,360
Annual $88,373


29. Pediatric Travel Nurse

About the Job:

This is a position where you will be working with children in a hospital setting in a variety of departments. Due to the nature of travel assignments, you will be required to frequently move and have temporary assignments in different hospitals across the nation. Within each individual assignment you will have typical pediatric nursing responsibilities such as monitoring vital signs, administering medication, and caregiver education, however, this will depend on the specific unit you are working in.

Required Education, Licensure, Certification, & Experience: Who is a Good Fit for this job:

Must be an RN and have nursing education from either a 4-year bachelor’s degree program or 2-year associate's program. Because each state has different requirements, you may need to seek further assistance in managing your certifications and qualifications such as working for a recruiting company.

Some states may require additional certifications to gain licensing and others may have additional requirements for pediatric-specific positions.

Who is a Good Fit for this job:

Someone who loves working with children and babies as well as someone who loves to travel. This unique experience might be great for someone with a family or a young but experienced nurse looking for some change in their routine. This unpredictable lifestyle is not for everyone, but may be a good fit for someone who is uncertain of where they want to settle down without committing to more than a few months.

Earning Potential:

$98,343 is the average annual Pediatric Travel Nurse salary in the U.S.

Hourly $47.28
Weekly $1,891
Monthly $8,200
Annual $98,343


30. Pediatric/Adolescent Psychology

About the Job:

Nurses that want to work with babies and kids may find themselves loving the psychology behind this particular population. These are crucial positions that can make a life-changing impact on children. Most of these positions will be within an inpatient psychiatric facility that holds adolescents until they are mentally stable enough to go back to their current living situation. There are a variety of placement options for these children, but often they require a stay until the medication is regulated or they are given additional support for their condition.

Required Education, Licensure, Certification, & Experience:

Must be an RN and have nursing education from either a 4-year bachelor’s degree program or 2-year associate's program.

There are additional certification programs that provide more insight into the field. You will be learning additional tips and tricks for behaviors and the impact of psychiatric care.

Who is a Good Fit for this job:

Typically, these jobs require a heightened sense of awareness and attention to detail. This population can be extremely subtle in their presentation of psychiatric disorders and may try to bend the rules while admitted into this unit. This job might also be good for someone who likes bedside nursing and working with children, but has not been as interested in the medical care or tasks associated with hospitalizations.

Earning Potential:

On average nurses that work in the area of Pediatric/Adolescent Psychology can expect to earn about $99,497, and this figure is predicted to increase over the next 5 years.

Hourly $47.84
Weekly $1,913
Monthly $8,290
Annual $99,497


31. Pediatricians Office

About the Job:

In most cases, pediatricians' offices are owned and operated by either a private physician or a healthcare system. Either way, you will usually work a standard 9-5 schedule as a nurse in a pediatrician's office or similar medical office. In addition, you will likely have holidays off. Pediatric offices typically provide general healthcare to children, but they may also specialize in certain fields.

At a pediatrician's office, you may administer vaccines, provide support to parents, and assist with check-ups that are necessary to ensure the health and well-being of all children. From newborns to teenagers, you can expect to work with children of all ages and with a variety of conditions. However, most are relatively healthy when they come to see you.

Required Education, Licensure, Certification, & Experience:

Must be an RN and have nursing education from either a 4-year bachelor’s degree program or 2-year associate's program.

Who is a Good Fit for this job:

It is a good match for someone who enjoys routine and working with children of all ages. It will be a similar day-to-day routine, and you will be working with a small staff and usually one pediatrician at a time. The same patients will be seen from an early age and you will be able to watch them grow into young adults. Obviously, this is not for everyone, but if you like having a general schedule for your day and want to understand what your day will look like throughout the week, this may be a good fit for you.

Earning Potential:

Nurses that work with babies and kids in the pediatrician office setting can expect to make around $37k per year.

Hourly $18.26
Weekly $730
Monthly $3,160
Annual $37,976


32. School Nurse

About the Job:

An onsite school nurse will typically have a schedule similar to those in the school. You will be responsible for administering medication to students in need as well as managing injuries or illness that occur during the school day. You will be working directly with students and will be working very independently because of the nature of the setting.

Required Education, Licensure, Certification, & Experience:

Must be an RN and have nursing education from either a 4-year bachelor’s degree program or 2-year associate's program.

Who is a Good Fit for this job:

This will be a good fit for someone who is looking for a position outside of a medical facility. The pace will typically be slower and you will be working independently so keep that in mind. It will be a great position for a new nurse or one who is looking to slow down their pace and work in a less stressful environment.

Earning Potential:

School Nurses make less than other nurses that work with kids and can expect an average of $60,739 per year.

Hourly $29.20
Weekly $1,168
Monthly $5,060
Annual $60,739



5 Tips To Stand Out In Your Job Search As A Nurse That Wants To Work With Babies And Kids


Nurses that work with babies and kids have the same minimum requirements as other nursing staff, but the following are a good way to set yourself apart and become a more desirable applicant.

1. Obtain unique certifications.

Like other specialties, there are additional certifications that you can get to better understand the role of your desired position.

2. Know why you want to work with children.

This can play into your mental health in and out of your working day. Knowing your “why” can either solidify your decision or alter your focus to a different specialty.

3. Have experience in some capacity.

By expanding on your other experiences of working with children, you will provide more variety in your approach. It is always a good idea to highlight relevant experiences in whatever way you see fit.

4. Understand the differences.

Working with babies and kids is different than working with adults. Some things may be better in your opinion, but other things will be more challenging. Understanding this in a personal way will make you stand out in your job search.

5. Having an individualized cover letter.

Applying for a new job can be intimidating especially when you are looking for a very specialized position. By having a cover letter that highlights your interest in the company and your desire to work with babies and kids, you will stand out when compared to other applicants.


On An Average, How Much Do Nurses That Work With Babies And Kids Make


Nurses that work with kids and babies typically make more in the coastal states. Specialty plays an important role in the salary of nurses who want to work with babies and kids. The level of education is also a factor when it comes to pay. The following are the salary details for nurses that work with babies and kids.

S. No Job Title Average
Annual Salary
1 Camp Nursing $47,560
2 Cardiac ICU (peds) $110,591
3 Labor and Delivery Nurse $99,043
4 Lactation Consultant $76,787
5 Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: NICU $99,711
6 Newborn Nursery $90,649
7 Orthopedics $96,259
8 Pediatric Acute Care Nurse Practitioner $119,337
9 Pediatric CNA $26,036
10 Pediatric Developmental Disability Nurse $52,603
11 Pediatric Diabetes Nurse $91,197
12 Pediatric Dialysis Nurse $105,902
13 Pediatric Emergency Department $100,939
14 Pediatric Flight Nurse $83,212
15 Pediatric Forensic Nurse $65,047
16 Pediatric Home Care Nurse $60,530
17 Pediatric Hospice or Home Health $75,329
18 Pediatric Infusion Nurse $78,231
19 Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) $104,555
20 Pediatric LPN $52,035
21 Pediatric Med-Surg Unit $86,567
22 Pediatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner $121,965
23 Pediatric Neurology Nurse $102,200
24 Pediatric Oncology Nurse $107,066
25 Pediatric Outpatient Surgery $74,004
26 Pediatric Primary Care Nurse Practitioner $116,073
27 Pediatric Pulmonary Nurse $84,491
28 Pediatric Trauma Nurse $88,373
29 Pediatric Travel Nurse $98,343
30 Pediatric/Adolescent Psychology $99,497
31 Pediatricians Office $37,976
32 School Nursing $60,739


5 Reasons Why Nurses That Work With Babies And Kids Will Always Be In Demand


The following are the 5 reasons why nurses that work with babies and kids will always be in demand.

1. It is considered a specialty.

Therefore, it may not be suitable for everyone. Children and babies are much different than adults and having such a unique set of nursing skills can be valuable in standing out amongst many applicants.

2. People will always continue to have children.

Our population has continued to grow over the years. From the first day of life, children need to be cared for and nurses will always be in demand because of this.

3. Typically, people with children do not want to do it.

For the first reason, it’s not for everyone. In general, you might shy away from working with children all day when you have your own at home to take care of.

4. Congenital conditions.

Congenital conditions will always be around and for this reason, pediatric nurses will always have a position within an organization.

5. Kids get hurt.

Let’s be real, accidents happen. Kids get hurt playing with other kids. They have diseases just like the adult population. They can get in car accidents. They are reliant on their family to care for them from day one and not all families are as capable.


My Final Thoughts


Nurses that love to work with babies and children have a wide range of opportunities. I hope I have answered your question of “what are some of the best jobs for nurses that want to work with babies and kids?” Please note is difficult to assess earning potential for each job as this is something that varies depending on geographic location and can also be influenced by your previous experience. Make sure you are enjoying your work and you will strive in any given situation. These are 32 great jobs for nurses that want to work with babies and kids in 2023 but there are many more if you still haven't found your niche.


FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ANSWERED BY OUR EXPERT


1. What Is A Nurse That Works With Babies And Kids Called?

Pediatrics encompasses working with children 17 years and younger. To be more specific with younger children you may be referred to as a neonatal nurse or depending on the unit you are working with, you might have that in your title as well to specify age range and area of focus.


2. What Is The Minimum Degree Required To Work As A Nurse Who Deals With Babies And Kids?

Typically working with babies and kids has the same minimum requirements as a nurse working with the adult population and the only requirement is an RN license. Additional requirements like certifications and training may be necessary once you are seeking employment within a specialty.


3. Do Nurses That Work With Babies And Kids Have A Part-Time Or Full-Time Schedule?

Like most other nurses, working with babies or children has the flexibility to work either part-time or full-time depending on the setting, specialty, and needs of the organization.


4. Where Do Nurses That Work With Babies And Kids Usually Work?

Nurses that work with babies and kids typically work in a hospital or outpatient clinic. But just like the adult population, there is an endless opportunity when it comes to where you can work as a nurse who wants to work with babies or children.


5. As A New Grad Nurse, Is It A Good Idea To Start A Nursing Job With Babies And Kids?

If you know this is where you want to work and where you want to spend the majority of your career, yes! If you are unsure, it might be a good idea to start working in a setting with more variety of patient care to gain more insight into what it is like working with babies and kids.


6. What Are The Top 3 Entry-Level Jobs For Nurses That Want To Work With Babies And Kids?

The top 3 entry-level jobs for nurses that want to work with babies and kids are:

School Nursing
Pediatric med-surg units
Outpatient pediatric offices.


7. What Are The Top 3 High-Paying Jobs For Nurses That Want To Work With Babies And Kids?

Specialized nurses who want to work with babies and kids have the potential to make the most money if they work in the following specialties and add additional certifications to their experience and education. The top three specialties and certifications are:

Certified Pediatric Hematology Oncology Nursing (CPHON)
Critical Care Registered Nurse (CCRN)
Certified Pediatric Emergency Nurse (CPEN)

These positions have additional training opportunities and typically require the most experience to best understand the position. These are also typically the more stressful environments to work in, which may play into the increased pay.


8. What Are The 3 Least Stressful Jobs For Nurses That Want To Work With Babies And Kids?

This question is very subjective, so it really depends on the individual but from my personal experience I would say the following jobs would be the least stressful jobs for nurses that want to work with babies and kids:

School Nursing
Camp nursing
Lactation consultants


9. Can A Nurse That Works With Babies And Kids Work From Home?

There may be options to work from home via teletherapy or as an advice nurse, but typically your nursing career will be in person.


10. Are There Any Non-Clinical Jobs For Nurses Who Want To Work With Babies And Kids?

Yes, there are non-clinical jobs for nurses who want to work with babies and kids. Consider camp or school nursing as a less clinical setting, but you may also consider being a nurse educator or nurse consultant for businesses that work closely with kids like daycares or school systems.


11. Are Nurses That Work With Babies And Kids Happier Than Other Nurses?

If this is your passion, then yes! I like to acknowledge everyone’s individual happiness regardless of their career choice, but working with babies and kids is not for everyone, so some nurses may not be happier in this position as such.


Brittney Bertagna, BSN, RN
Brittney Bertagna is currently a nurse and writer in Las Vegas, NV. After receiving a bachelor’s degree in business administration she completed nursing school and became a registered nurse. While working a night shift in the neonatal ICU she went back to school to get her second bachelor’s degree in nursing from Western Governors University. Now she enjoys working with children in the surgical setting as well as with her adult patients as an infusion nurse.