FIND PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAMS

FIND PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAMS

Is a Master’s in Forensic Psychology Worth it – (Pros VS. Cons)


Written By: Darby Faubion BSN, RN

Are you looking for an exciting career that will spare you from the boredom of most 9-5 jobs? Did you earn your undergraduate degree in psychology or a related health science and have an interest in criminal justice? If so, earning a master's in forensic psychology could be an excellent option. Maybe you have considered forensic psychology as a career path but wonder, "Is a master’s in forensic psychology worth it?”

In this article, I will try to answer that question by sharing 25 reasons why a master’s in forensic psychology is worth it and 7 reasons why it may not be the right degree for you. As you continue reading, you will find information about the program's goals, how long it takes to earn a master's in forensic psychology, and what you can do with the degree. By the time you finish the article, you will have information to help you decide if this is a career path you wish to pursue.



RECOMMENDED ONLINE PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAMS

WHAT IS A MASTER’S IN FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY DEGREE?


A master’s in forensic psychology is a specialized psychology degree that gives you a deeper understanding of human behavior and how it relates to the law and the criminal justice system. This degree program will prepare you to apply psychological knowledge, theory, competencies, and skills in civil and criminal justice systems and behavioral health settings, as well as several other diverse opportunities.



HOW LONG DOES A MASTER’S IN FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY DEGREE TAKE?


A master’s in forensic psychology degree typically takes two to three years to complete, depending on whether you enroll as a part-time or full-time student. Because one of the prerequisites is to have a previous bachelor’s degree, you don’t have to spend four or more years earning the degree (unless you choose to take your time).

For example, at Marymount University, you can earn a master's in forensic psychology in 18 to 24 if you enroll full-time. Part-time students typically graduate in three years. The University of Denver offers a full-time Master of Forensic Psychology program that takes two years to complete. At Fairleigh Dickinson University, you can complete your degree with 18 months of full-time study, which includes taking classes in the summer.



HOW MUCH DOES A MASTER’S IN FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY DEGREE COST?


If you are like most prospective graduate students, one of the deciding factors regarding going back to school is cost. Because several factors determine program costs, it is essential to research different programs and weigh your options. The cost to earn a degree as a Master of Forensic Psychology can range between $20,000 and $80,000.

For example, at the University of Houston- Victoria, you will pay $480.72 per credit if you are considered in-state and $888.72 per credit if you are out-of-state. The program includes a 66-credit hour curriculum, which means in-state students pay approximately $31,727.52, and out-of-state students pay an average of $58,655.52 to earn the degree.

The University of North Dakota charges $660.08 per credit hour. The program requires you to complete 30 credits, costing $19,802.40 to complete your degree. At The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, the Master of Forensic Psychology program costs $1,303 per credit. The curriculum consists of 37 credit hours, costing an average of $48,211.



WHAT ARE THE ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR A MASTER’S IN FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY DEGREE?


Although the admission criteria for Master's in Forensic Psychology programs may vary among programs, the general admission requirements are similar. The following are some of the criteria you must meet to be considered for admission.

• A bachelor's degree with a focus in behavioral or social sciences or a bachelor's degree in psychology, criminal justice, sociology, counseling, or social work
• A minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale
• Copies of official transcripts from any post-secondary school
• A written statement or letter of purpose
• Letters of recommendation from previous instructors or people you have worked with
• Some schools will also want your standardized test scores from the Graduate Record Exam (GRE)
• International students or those for whom English is a second language are typically asked to submit International English Language Testing System (TOEFL) test scores.




WHY IS A MASTER’S IN FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY WORTH IT? – THE PROS


(The following are the 25 reasons why a Master’s in Forensic Psychology is worth it in 2023.)

REASON #1: You will have a deeper understanding of human behavior.


Have you ever wondered why people make the decisions they make? Why do criminals commit crimes? What makes crime victims react a specific way to trauma? Earning a master’s in forensic psychology is worth it if you want to learn the answers to these questions. You can use your knowledge of human behavior to predict the possibility of future criminal behavior, treat offenders or victims, and help law enforcement.


REASON #2: You can work for the government.


With a master's in forensic psychology, you could work in various government jobs, including as a jury consultant, investigator, or in federal prison programs. One of the great things about government jobs is they come with excellent salaries and benefits. If you like the idea of combining your love of psychology with working in a government job, you may feel a master’s in forensic psychology is worth it.


REASON #3: You will gain an in-depth knowledge of how the law and human behavior relate to one another.


Forensic psychology focuses on more than criminal behavior. When you earn a master's in forensic psychology, you will be able to look at crime and criminal behavior with a legal perspective, studying criminal justice, law, and crime prevention to discover how all of these relate and the impact of each on the other. You will have firsthand insight into how decisions are made and the unique details that make legal systems work. If you are interested in learning about the law and human behavior, you may find a master’s degree in psychology is worth it.


REASON #4: Earning a master's in forensic psychology lays the groundwork for doctoral studies.


One of the top reasons why a master’s in forensic psychology is worth it is that you can pursue a doctoral degree in psychology. Holding a Ph.D. in Forensic Psychology is a lucrative and high-demand job. You will significantly increase your income and provide a crucial service to individuals in need, government agencies, and the criminal justice system.


REASON #5: You can become an investigative journalist.


Suppose you like the idea of investigating and discovering new things and are interested in the legal system. In that case, you could use your master's in forensic psychology to become an investigative journalist. As an investigative journalist, you will collect and analyze information from witnesses and informants related to a crime, interview people involved in a criminal event, and follow up on leads that could result in solving crimes, bringing criminals to justice, and closure to victims. Some forensic investigative journalists write content for the internet and television and host documentaries about events.


REASON #6: You do not need a bachelor’s in psychology before pursuing a master’s in forensic psychology.


One of the biggest reasons a master’s in forensic psychology is worth it is you do not need an undergraduate degree in psychology before pursuing this academic or career path. If you have a bachelor's degree in social work, criminal justice, or another relevant field, you are a good candidate for a master's in forensic psychology program. Keep in mind, you may need to take some psychology prerequisites, but your previous degree still gives you a head start on completing the degree.


REASON #7: You can work on a specialty crisis intervention team.


A crisis intervention team is a collaborative team that promotes positive interactions between mentally ill individuals, their loved ones, mental healthcare professionals, and law enforcement officers. Crisis intervention teams are instrumental in reducing the arrests of people with mental illness, and their work is associated with fewer officer injuries during mental health emergency calls. With a master's degree in forensic psychology, you could be a valuable part of a crisis intervention team, helping to de-escalate crisis situations.


REASON #8: You can help incarcerated individuals.


With a master's in forensic psychology, you can assess and evaluate suspects and criminal offenders to determine their eligibility for a rehabilitation plan. Your knowledge and expertise will be instrumental in helping determine whether rehabilitation efforts for offenders have been successful and make recommendations on whether to continue incarceration, long-term treatment, or plan for their exit from incarceration. You can also help determine if someone suspected of a crime and awaiting trial is competent to stand trial. The help you provide to incarcerated individuals could help turn their lives around and is enough to make many people believe a master’s in forensic psychology is worth it.


REASON #9: The job outlook for graduates of master’s in forensic psychology programs is promising.


The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts psychology jobs will increase by 8% between 2020 and 2030. This rate suggests you will be able to find employment easily after graduating from the program. Considering the various avenues to specialize and diverse settings where you could work, the job outlook suggests earning a master’s in forensic psychology is worth it.


REASON #10: You could play a critical role in identifying and reducing the risk of terrorism.


Although forensic psychology degree holders can be responsible for studying and understanding the behavior behind terrorists' actions. This knowledge and research can help the government run counterterrorism and better predict and prevent future terrorist attacks. If you want to help with this critical work, a master’s in forensic psychology degree is worth it.


REASON #11: You can earn a good income.


One of the biggest reasons a master's in forensic psychology is worth it is the potential to earn a good income. Graduates of master's in forensic psychology programs earn an average of a little more than $98,000 annually. Your income potential can be significantly higher depending on the setting where you work and your years of experience.


REASON #12: You can specialize your degree for specific careers.


Another reason you may feel a master's in forensic psychology is worth it is that you can specialize. Depending on your preference, a few options for specialization include adult forensic psychology, child & family forensic psychology, law enforcement, or forensic neuropsychology.


REASON #13: You can participate in research opportunities while enrolled and after graduating.


Some graduate programs offer you access to research through specialized programs or faculty. As a graduate of a master's in forensic psychology program, you may choose to use your knowledge and skills to conduct research with others or independently. Forensic psychology researchers often research what type of person is likely to commit a particular crime and who may become a repeat offender. This research background can help you stand out when applying for jobs after graduation.


REASON #14: You can make an impact in your local community.


If you choose to work in your local criminal justice department in the community where you live, you can make an impact on your local community. You can help solve crimes and ensure fair trials for the people in your county or state. If making a positive impact on your community is your goal, a master’s in forensic psychology is worth it.


REASON#15: You can work as a victim’s advocate.


With a master's in forensic psychology, you can not only work within the criminal justice system to help address criminal behavior and help identify possible risks of criminal behavior. You can also work as an advocate representing crime victims. As a victim's advocate, you may help victims understand their legal rights and offer support through trials. You may attend hearings with the victim or act as a witness describing a criminal event's impact on the victim.


REASON#16: You can collaborate with professionals from several fields.


With a master's degree in forensic psychology, you will have an in-depth knowledge of the thoughts and behaviors of people as it relates to forensic science. Your education and experiences will make you a perfect candidate to collaborate with professionals from several fields, including law enforcement, physicians, probation and parole officers, and educators.


REASON #17: You can teach at a college or university.


One of the great things about earning a master's degree in forensic psychology is that you can use your knowledge and clinical skills to teach others by becoming an instructor at a college or university. If you enjoy sharing your knowledge and mentoring others, the possibility of a career in academia is another reason that makes a master’s in psychology worth it.


REASON#18: You can become a licensed forensic clinical counselor.


If working one-on-one with clients interests you, you could use your master's in forensic psychology to become a licensed forensic clinical counselor. As a forensic clinical counselor, you can counsel individuals who have been incarcerated or are presently in jail. You may work with inmates individually or in group therapy settings and report to authorities about their progress in therapy sessions.


REASON#19: You can impact and improve the lives of children in the juvenile justice system.


When you earn a master's in forensic psychology, you will have the knowledge many judges, attorneys, and family social workers rely upon to make critical decisions about minors involved in juvenile justice systems. Your forensic evaluations will provide caseworkers, law enforcement officers, attorneys, hearing officers, and judges with valuable insight into the minor's behavioral, cognitive, and emotional functioning and abilities.


REASON#20: With a master’s in forensic psychology, you will enjoy challenging work.


The field of forensic psychology is unique and diverse. Whether you work as a consultant, in private practice, or with law enforcement, you can expect to be challenged and learn things daily. If you like the idea of growing, learning, and being challenged, you may feel a master’s in forensic psychology is worth it.


REASON#21: You can find work almost anywhere.


Another one of the biggest reasons why a master’s in forensic psychology is worth it is that you can work almost anywhere. Whether you stay in your current city or state or move somewhere new, your master's degree in forensic psychology qualifies you for exciting jobs anywhere you go.


REASON#22: You can become a probation officer.


If you are interested in the justice system but prefer to have a more independent role, you could use your master's in forensic psychology to become a probation officer. As a probation officer, you will assist in supervising people recently released from correctional facilities as they transition to civilian life.


REASON#23: Many forensic psychology jobs offer great work schedules.


Although some forensic psychology jobs may require evening, night or weekend shifts, most have predictable work schedules. If you have a home and family or other responsibilities outside of work, having a good work schedule is one of the reasons you may feel a master’s in forensic psychology is worth it.


REASON#24: You can start your own business.


As a Master of Forensic Psychology, you can start your own business. You may choose to offer counseling services to offenders or victims of crimes. You could open a consulting firm or conduct research related to forensic psychology. The possibilities for business opportunities are unlimited.


REASON#25: You can help people affected by drug addiction and substance abuse disorders.


Studies show that approximately 62% of perpetrators of general violence are diagnosed with some type of substance abuse disorder. Because of the close relationship between substance abuse and violence, many behavioral health programs and substance abuse centers utilize forensic psychology professionals to develop and implement specialized treatment plans for clients. In this role, you can identify risk factors for violence and educate individuals about substance use and its relationship to violence, which can contribute to reducing risks. The impact your knowledge, skills, and guidance will have on clients, their loved ones, and the public makes a master’s in forensic psychology worth it.



WHY A MASTER’S IN FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY MAY NOT BE WORTH IT FOR YOU? – THE CONS


(Now that we have discussed the 25 reasons why a Master’s in Forensic Psychology is worth it, I want to share a few reasons why you could feel a Master’s in Forensic Psychology is not worth it.)

REASON #1: You may be unable to "leave work at work."


Because of the nature of the work involved in forensic psychology, it is important to set personal boundaries so what you see and do every day does not negatively impact your personal life. If you find it difficult to leave work at the office or separate your personal life from your work life, you may feel a master’s in psychology is not worth it.


REASON #2: Working in forensic psychology can be stressful.


Even if you enjoy working in forensic psychology, the work can be quite stressful. Depending on where you work, you may deal with criminal offenders, crime victims, or tense legal situations. If you do not handle stress well, you could feel pursuing a master’s in forensic psychology is not worth it.


REASON #3: You may have to work long hours.


Some people with forensic psychology degrees work long hours. This is especially true if you work alongside law enforcement or in correctional or behavioral health facilities. You may be called upon at odd hours, evenings, or weekends to evaluate offenders or victims. Although some people feel this is enough reason to say a master’s in psychology is not worth it, if you genuinely want to work in this field, you can consider specializing in a field with a more routine schedule.


REASON #4: Your expertise could be called into question in legal proceedings.


With a master's degree in forensic psychology, you may be called on to share your knowledge and experience in a legal setting, such as in the role of an expert witness. While some personal pleasure is derived from being called an "expert," you also open yourself up to critique from opposing sides. If you are not confident defending your knowledge and experience or are easily offended, you could do more harm than good on the witness stand. For this reason, you may feel a master’s in psychology is not worth it.


REASON #5: A forensic psychology career may change how you view others and could negatively impact your personal relationships.


One of the unfortunate things about working in forensic psychology is how the things you see each day could affect your personal life. Even the most seasoned professionals working on complex cases may feel such empathy for clients that it affects their outlook on personal relationships. While demonstrating compassion and empathy are good qualities for forensic psychology professionals, the outcome could be detrimental to your relationships if you find it challenging to show compassion without allowing yourself to become emotionally affected. In this case, I believe it is safe to say earning a master’s in psychology is not worth it.


REASON #6: You are happy with your career where it is.


There are many advantages to earning a master's in forensic psychology. However, if you are happy with your current career and have no aspiration to change paths or advance to a position that requires a graduate degree in forensic psychology, a master's in psychology may not be worth it.


REASON #7: Ignoring your personal biases can be challenging.


As a forensic psychologist, you will be considered an expert in your field. It is understandable to have personal feelings about crime, offenders, and their victims. When involved in criminal cases or investigations, you must ignore personal biases and stick to the facts. Failure to ignore personal biases could jeopardize a criminal case or a legal decision for an offender or victim. Therefore, if you find it difficult to separate your personal feelings and biases from facts related to the job, you may feel a master’s in forensic psychology is not worth it.



WHAT ARE THE 3 MAIN REASONS BEHIND THE DEMAND FOR MASTER’S IN FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY DEGREE HOLDERS?


Although forensic psychology is not a new science, it is becoming more popular. The demand for professionally trained psychology majors with forensic knowledge is increasing, as well. The following are three of the main reasons behind the demand for master’s in forensic psychology degree holders.

1. An Increase in Violent Crime Rates:

As the rate of violent crimes continues to rise, there is a growing demand for trained professionals who can help investigate and interpret data from crimes, help understand why and how they occurred, and determine the likelihood of someone being a repeat offender. Forensic psychologists can also help to understand the human behavior behind people who commit crimes and help them repair their bad behavior.

2. Increased awareness of the relationship between psychological disorders and criminal behavior:

Today, there is increased awareness about mental health, mental illness, and addictive and behavioral disorders. With that awareness, there is also a better understanding of how psychological disorders play a role in one's propensity to commit criminal acts. Forensic psychology professionals understand the relationship between psychological disorders and a person's behavior and work to find ways to rehabilitate offenders, making this an in-demand service.

3. A growing number of cybercrimes:

In a world now driven by technology, there is a marked increase in cybercrimes and malware attacks, with tens of thousands of people and businesses affected daily. In fact, according to Digital Guardian, cybercrime cost the United States $6.9 billion in 2021. Forensic psychology degree holders use their skills to help analyze the evidence of cybercrimes and understand the reason criminals target specific people or companies through online crimes. With an in-depth knowledge of forensics and human behavior, forensic psychology degree holders can teach individuals, businesses, governments, and populations measures to protect against cybercrimes.



WHAT IS THE STARTING SALARY FOR NEW MASTER’S IN FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY DEGREE HOLDERS?


The starting salary for new graduates of master's in forensic psychology programs is $39,760 per year. This can also be broken down to $3,310 per month, $765 per week, and, $19.12 per hour.

Hourly$19.12
Weekly$765
Monthly$3,310
Annual$39,760
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)



WHAT IS THE AVERAGE SALARY FOR EXPERIENCED MASTER’S IN FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY DEGREE HOLDERS?


The average salary for master’s in forensic psychology degree holders is around $98,010 per year. This is also equivalent to $8,170 per month, $1,885 per week, or $47.12 per hour.

Hourly$47.12
Weekly$1,885
Monthly$8,170
Annual$98,010
(Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)



IS THE COST OF A MASTER’S IN FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY DEGREE WORTH THE RETURN ON INVESTMENT (ROI)?


If you look at the average cost to complete your degree compared to the average starting salary you can expect, your return on investment should happen within a few years of graduating. Of course, the specific amount of time it will take to see your ROI depends on the cost of the program you choose, how much financial aid you receive, your starting salary, and how soon you receive pay increases. Overall, the long-term return on investment for a master's in forensic psychology degree is positive.



WHAT ARE THE 3 BEST JOBS YOU CAN GET WITH A MASTER’S IN FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY DEGREE?


There are numerous jobs and subspecialties to choose from when you earn a master’s in forensic psychology degree. The following are three of the best jobs graduates of these programs find.

1. Jury Consultant:

In this job, you will have multiple responsibilities, including assisting with jury selection, helping to prepare expert witnesses for their testimony, and analyzing and consolidating relevant forensic data. This can be an exciting job that gives you a high level of exposure to the criminal justice system and utilizes your degree at the highest level.

2. Crime Analyst:

Crime analysts work with law enforcement officers and agencies to sort profiles and detect suspects of crimes. The role involves providing strategic, statistical, and investigative support to law enforcement officers by collecting data about crimes in a specific region. Crime analysts review criminal reports, recorded police calls, arrest records, and other pertinent data to help law enforcement identify areas at increased risk for criminal activity. They also develop and test measures to predict and reduce crime and identify crime patterns and trends.

3. Forensic Laboratory Manager:

With a master's in forensic psychology, you will be qualified to work as a manager in a forensics laboratory. You may analyze evidence collected from suspects, victims, or crime scenes, identify weapons suspected of use in a criminal act, perform document analysis or run trace analysis of fibers and hairs. The work that occurs behind the scenes in a forensics laboratory plays an integral part in bringing offenders to justice.



BONUS! 3 TIPS TO MAKE MORE MONEY WITH A MASTER’S IN FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY DEGREE?


When you earn a master’s in forensic psychology, you can choose to work for someone else or have your own business, depending on your primary interests. Much of your decision will probably be based on your earning potential. The following are a few tips to help you make more money with a master’s in forensic psychology degree.

1. Become a consultant:

With a master's in forensic psychology, you can use your knowledge and experience to offer consulting services to legal firms or private attorneys. Working as an independent consultant gives you the freedom to set your own rates and make more money to supplement or even replace your current income.

2. Choose a dual degree:

You can choose to have a dual master’s degree in forensic psychology and law or criminal justice. Although you will learn about both law and criminal justice through the program, having a dual degree gives you more in-depth knowledge and will make you more valuable to private companies.

3. Select a licensure track program:

Many of the master's in forensic psychology programs offer either licensure or non-licensure track. By choosing a licensure track, you will be eligible to take a professional exam and apply for licensure after graduating. Being a licensed psychologist allows you to practice in clinical settings and use your degree in more ways. Licensed psychologists can also make more money compared to their non-licensed counterparts.



SO, IS A MASTER’S IN FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY WORTH YOUR TIME AND MONEY – MY FINAL THOUGHTS


If you are interested in psychology and the legal system, it is natural to wonder about career options. Knowing you can combine your love for studying human behavior and the law, it is natural to wonder, "Is a master’s in forensic psychology worth it?” In this article, we discussed 25 reasons why a master's in forensic psychology is worth it and 7 reasons why it may not be the right degree for you to give you some insight into what your career could be like with this degree. If you imagine yourself working alongside law enforcement and crime victims, or conducting research related to forensic psychology, earning a master's degree in forensic psychology is well worth the time and money it takes to earn the degree.



FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ANSWERED


1. What Is The Best Age To Pursue A Master’s In Forensic Psychology Degree?

While there is no perfect age to pursue a master’s in forensic psychology, one of the prerequisites is to have a previously earned bachelor’s degree. With that in mind, the youngest most candidates pursue this degree is early to mid-20s. Knowing when the right time or best age is to pursue a degree is objective and a decision to be weighed carefully.


2. How Hard Is It To Get Into A Master’s In Forensic Psychology Degree Program?

Admission to master's in forensic psychology degree programs may be more competitive in some areas than others. Ensuring you meet all the necessary prerequisites before applying can help increase your chances of getting into a top program.


3. Do I Need Work Experience To Get Into A Master’s In Forensic Psychology Degree Program?

Generally, work experience in forensics or psychology is not required to get into a master's in forensic psychology program. However, if you have experience, it could help to highlight it on your application or professional resume when applying.


4. What Is The Minimum GPA To Get Into A Master’s In Forensic Psychology Degree Program?

Minimum GPA requirements vary for master’s in forensic psychology programs, with the average being 3.0 on a 4.0 scale for all college coursework or your most recent degree.


5. Are Online Master’s In Forensic Psychology Degree Programs Worth It?

Yes! If you want to earn a master’s in forensic psychology and need the flexibility of online learning to accomplish that goal, an online master's in forensic psychology program is worth it.


6. Are Scholarships And Grants Available For Master’s In Forensic Psychology Degree Programs?

Yes, there are many scholarships and grant opportunities for students seeking a master’s in forensic psychology degree.


7. Is It Hard To Complete A Master’s In Forensic Psychology Degree?

All master’s programs can be challenging and hard to complete. If obtaining a master’s in forensic psychology is something you are passionate about, it is worth the hard work to achieve the degree.


8. Can Master’s In Forensic Psychology Students Have A Life?

It is definitely possible for students in master's in forensic psychology programs to have a life. Creating a healthy school/work/life balance is conducive to good physical and mental health, which can help you succeed in the program.


9. Can I Work Part-Time And Successfully Complete The Master’s In Forensic Psychology Degree Program?

Many students in master’s in forensic psychology programs choose to continue working while earning their degrees.


10. Can I Work Full-Time And Successfully Complete The Master’s In Forensic Psychology Degree Program?

It is possible to work full-time and complete a master's in forensic psychology degree program. However, it requires careful planning for your work, school, and personal schedules to succeed.


11. Do Students Fail In Master’s In Forensic Psychology Degree Programs?

Unfortunately, just like any degree program, some students fail master’s in forensic psychology programs. If you begin a program and find yourself struggling with grades, talk to your academic advisor and instructors to determine a plan to help you get back on track.


12. Will I Ever Regret Getting A Master’s In Forensic Psychology Degree?

Although it is difficult to predict whether you will regret getting a master’s in forensic psychology, the majority of degree holders report being happy with their career choice.


13. How Much Does A Master’s In Forensic Psychology Graduate Make Per Hour?

Graduates of master’s in forensic psychology programs make an average of $47.12 per hour.

$47.12


14. How Much Does A Master’s In Forensic Psychology Graduate Make Per Year?

On average, master’s in forensic psychology program graduates make $98,010 per year.

$98,010


15. Will Master’s In Forensic Psychology Graduates Be Paid Less In The Future?

Due to current inflation and the growing demand for qualified professionals in this field, it is not likely that master’s in forensic psychology program graduates will see a reduction in pay.


16. Are All Master’s In Forensic Psychology Graduates Successful In Their Careers?

While many graduates of master’s in forensic psychology graduates are successful in their careers, not all graduates succeed. Being successful in your career is a product of your choosing the right job and finding value in your work.


17. Are Master’s In Forensic Psychology Graduates Happy With Their Jobs?

Current data suggests most graduates of master's in forensic psychology programs are happy with their jobs. However, that is not to say that all graduates are satisfied. The great thing about this degree is that there are options to specialize or transition to another field in psychology if you become unhappy in your current role.


18. Can Master’s In Forensic Psychology Degree Holders Become Rich?

Being rich is a matter of opinion. Some people define rich based on personal possessions and financial wealth, and others consider being rich having a happy and full life. With a master's in forensic psychology degree, you can attain personal wealth and financial stability. Careful planning with your finances and avoiding unnecessary spending can build your wealth, while doing things you enjoy and helping others can give you a sense of feeling emotionally rich.


19. What Are Some Of The Best Master’s In Forensic Psychology Degree Alternatives?

Some of the best master’s in forensic psychology degree alternatives are degrees in social work, criminal justice, and research assistant.


Darby Faubion BSN, RN
Darby Faubion is a nurse and Allied Health educator with over twenty years of experience. She has assisted in developing curriculum for nursing programs and has instructed students at both community college and university levels. Because of her love of nursing education, Darby became a test-taking strategist and NCLEX prep coach and assists nursing graduates across the United States who are preparing to take the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX).