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10 Pros and Cons of Being an Endoscopy Nurse


Written By: Jennifer Schlette MSN, RN

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to work as an endoscopy nurse? You are not alone if you have. In fact, many nurses are curious too! Being an endoscopy nurse is an interesting and exciting job. Do you know what are the pros and cons of being an endoscopy nurse? Well, I have got your answer with this blog post. I am going to let you know all about the pros and cons of being an endoscopy nurse such as what the job entails, where an endoscopy nurse works and the salary information about this job. You will find all you need to know about this profession in this 10-point guide. So, are you ready for a bit of education about the career of an endoscopy nurse? Let's go! Here are the top 10 pros and cons of being an endoscopy nurse.


What Does An Endoscopy Nurse Do?


What does an endoscopy nurse do? An endoscopy nurse is responsible for the comfort of patients undergoing a procedure requiring an endoscope placed inside their body to view any abnormalities, growths, or changes in the structure of the alimentary canal or other hollow internal organs.

As an endoscopy nurse, you will find that your day will be filled with a rush after rush of patients. You will be responsible for the patient’s safety and well-being throughout the process, making sure they are comfortable, relaxed, pain-free, and stress-free. The endoscopy nurse is in charge of preparing the patient with the necessary medications, sedation if required, and positioning equipment such as the stirrups or footrests used to assist the patient in positioning during the procedure. The endoscopy nurse will also be responsible for monitoring the patient’s vital signs and documenting the patient's information and the procedure. Each patient you have will be a new and exciting experience.


Where Does An Endoscopy Nurse Work?


You can find endoscopy nurses working in private outpatient clinics, community health services, private hospitals, and government agencies. With the rapid development of medical technology such as endoscopy equipment and improved application techniques, there is a wide variety of ways for endoscopy nurses to utilize their skills in the industry. You may also find endoscopy nurses working in administration departments, education departments, and research departments.


How Much Does An Endoscopy Nurse Make?


As an endoscopy nurse, you can expect to earn a pretty good living. What is nice about this career choice is that your earning potential will increase with your years of experience in the field. In essence, you are being rewarded for your longevity as an endoscopy nurse with a higher salary. The average endoscopy nurse salary is around $78,669 per year, which is $37.82 an hour. So, let’s break it down a bit more. I am going to show you how you will get rewarded for your experience. So, if you are just starting out in this career, you can expect an entry-level salary of around $32.69 an hour, which is $68,000 a year. If you have been working for some time, you will be able to expect a mid-level experience salary of $43.27 an hour, which is $90,000 a year. That is quite a jump. Now, the top-level experience salary will be around $98,000 a year, which roughly works out to be $47.12 an hour.

Level of
Experience
HourlyAnnual
Entry-Level$32.69$68,000
Mid-Level$43.27$90,000
Top-Level$47.12$98,000
Average Salary$37.82$78,669
(Source: Ziprecruiter.com)


Steps To Becoming An Endoscopy Nurse


The first step in order to become an endoscopy nurse is to attend and graduate from an accredited nursing program. The minimum degree you need to work as an endoscopy nurse is an Associate's degree in nursing. However, many employers will require you to earn a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN).

The next step to becoming an endoscopy nurse is to pass the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX-RN). In order to take the exam, you must be at least 18 years of age and have graduated from an accredited nursing program. The NCLEX-RN examination is a computerized test that consists of multiple-choice and alternative format questions.

The final step to becoming an endoscopy nurse is to gain valuable experience. Hospitals are more likely to hire you for an endoscopy nurse position if you have worked as a nurse in another capacity.


TOP CONS OF BEING AN ENDOSCOPY NURSE

(The following are the top 10 disadvantages of being an Endoscopy Nurse.)

1. You will need a formal education.

In order to become an endoscopy nurse, you will need to complete a formal education in nursing. You can choose to earn an associate degree or a bachelor’s degree. One of the top disadvantages of being an endoscopy nurse is that the formal education required for this field will need at least two to four years to complete. This can be an extended amount of time without being able to possibly work full time. You have the potential to be spending a lot more money than you are making.

2. Your education will be expensive.

We already discussed that you will need to earn a formal education if you want to become an endoscopy nurse. The downside to this is that this formal education is not free. If you choose to pursue an associate’s degree, you will be spending anywhere from $4,651 to $135,759. A public institution will cost you between $4,651 and $45,282, and a private institution $5,939 and $135,759. If you choose to pursue a bachelor’s degree, you are looking to spend anywhere from $8,590 to $201,610. At private institutions, you will pay anywhere from $16,710 to $201,610 for your education. Public schools offer the most affordable education but are still expensive, the program cost will be anywhere from $8,590 to $112,890.

3. You must pass a licensing exam.

To be an endoscopy nurse, you must possess a nursing license. In order to obtain your nursing license, you must pass the NCLEX licensing exam. This exam is administered by the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN). There are hundreds of thousands of students who graduate from nursing programs each year who take this exam and hope they pass and become registered nurses. However, the NCLEX exam is very difficult for many individuals to pass. It is designed to ensure that all nurses possess the knowledge and skills necessary to provide high-quality patient care in any setting. The exam covers all content areas that are relevant to nursing practice; therefore, there are no shortcuts or tips that guarantee success on this exam. So, if you do not pass this exam, well, it looks like you will not be working as an endoscopy nurse anytime soon.

4. Your day will be extremely busy.

I hope you are prepared to be working in an extremely busy environment. One of the pros and cons of being an endoscopy nurse is that your day will be packed. Having such a packed day can be good and bad. Sometimes having such a packed day will leave you exhausted at the end of the day and sometimes it may make the day go extremely fast. During your busy day, you are usually the first point of contact for patients before they move on to meeting other diagnostic staff. You will have many different responsibilities, including taking blood, assisting with patient preparation, and helping physicians throughout their examination by handing them equipment if needed. Furthermore, you may also need to deal with more urgent matters such as anaphylaxis, severe bleeding, and other emergencies if they should arise. So, if you are looking for a slow-paced sit-down type of job, well, an endoscopy nurse is not it.

5. You will be exposed to pathogens.

One of the biggest disadvantages of being an endoscopy nurse is that you may be exposed to all different types of pathogens. Some of these pathogens that you may be exposed to can make you sick. You may even run the risk of infecting your loved ones. You could be exposed to Ecoli or Giardia lamblia to name a few. Giardia lamblia is a small parasite that causes severe diarrhea, stomach cramps, and nausea. Ecoli has similar symptoms but also causes vomiting. Neither of these sounds fun to contract.

6. You may have to be on-call.

The need for an endoscopy procedure can occur at any time. You may be called in on weekends, after hours, and holidays. You never know when you will be called in to assist on a procedure, so prepare yourself for many nights and holidays on-call. Being on-call can make it difficult to enjoy your time off. You will not be able to do much on your days off because you never know when that call will come in. When the phone rings, you must drop everything you are doing and go in to assist with endoscopies.

7. You may encounter emergency situations.

One of the disadvantages of being an endoscopy nurse is that you will never know when you may encounter an emergency situation. Sometimes these situations can be stressful and frustrating. An emergency may come from the emergency room, the in-patient hospital units or may occur during a routine procedure. Regardless of where the emergency stems from, you will be required to jump into action. I hope you can think on your toes.

8. You must stay up to date with techniques and procedures.

As an endoscopy nurse, it will be your responsibility to keep up-to-date on the latest endoscopy equipment, procedures, and techniques. It is essential that you learn the procedures and understand why they are using specific endoscopy equipment, what it is used for, and how it will benefit the patient. This additional education can be highly time-consuming and may occur outside of work hours.

9. You may be on your feet all-day

Working in endoscopy will have you on your feet all the time. You will be moving around helping doctors and surgeons, checking equipment to make sure it is working correctly, preparing supplies for procedures, monitoring patients before, during and after procedures; it never ends. This can be highly exhausting. Being an endoscopy nurse is not an easy job when it comes to physical demands. You will be lifting patients up in bed for procedures, moving them around, or putting them on stretchers when they are transported.

10. You could be exposed to radiation.

One of the cons of being an endoscopy nurse is that you will have the potential to be exposed to radiation. Some of the procedures that are performed in endoscopy will utilize radiation. There is a chance that you can be exposed to radiation each time you are in an endoscopy room. Too much radiation can cause you to become ill or develop cancer.


TOP PROS OF BEING AN ENDOSCOPY NURSE

(The following are the top 10 advantages of being an Endoscopy Nurse.)

1. You will earn a great living.

One of the top pros of being an endoscopy nurse is the money you will be making. Endoscopy nurses make an excellent salary. The average salary for an endoscopy nurse is approximately $78,669 per year, which is $37.82 an hour. If you are new to the career, you can expect an entry-level salary of around $32.69 an hour, which is $68,000 a year. A mid-level experience salary is about $43.27 an hour, which is $90,000 a year. If you have been working for some time, you can expect a top-level experience salary of around $98,000 a year, which roughly works out to be $47.12 an hour. Think of all you can do with an earning like this.

2. You may not have to work scheduled weekends.

Another one of the top pros of being an endoscopy nurse is that you may not have to work scheduled weekends. Not having to work weekends is often one of the best perks of being an endoscopy nurse. When you have weekends off, you will be able to spend time with your family and friends or just catch up on some decent sleep.

3. You may not have to work holidays.

Being an endoscopy nurse means that you can spend quality time with your loved ones during the holidays. This is because an endoscopy nurse may not have to work holidays. You will be able to celebrate Thanksgiving hand in hand with them, watch Christmas shows in a row, and even make New Year's resolutions at midnight together!

4. You could make extra money by being on-call

One of the biggest advantages of being an endoscopy nurse is that you may be able to earn additional income when being on-call. Most institutions will offer an hourly rate to be on-call and another if you are called in. You essentially will have the potential to make extra money for not having to go to work if you do not get called in.

5. You will have job security.

Job security is a nice safety blanket to have. As an endoscopy nurse, you will be able to have that job security that so many people strive for. Think about it, people are always going to need endoscopic procedures. This is great if you are an endoscopy nurse.

6. You can earn your certification.

As an endoscopy nurse, you will be able to become certified in your field. One of the pros and cons of being an endoscopy nurse is that you will have to evaluate if earning certification is right for you. Earning your certification will show others that you are an expert in your area. Certification may also mean that you will receive a higher salary depending on where you work. Earning certification will also make you more marketable if you are looking for a new job.

7. You can work anywhere.

One of the pros of being an endoscopy nurse is that you can work anywhere. You will be able to find a job anywhere in the country. So, if you're looking for a change of scenery, endoscopy is your ticket. The turnover rate in the endoscopy industry is high. This means that there are always new jobs opening up, and hospitals need to fill these positions immediately because of the high patient volume and urgency. It has to feel great that you are so desired.

8. You will be part of a team.

Being part of a team is a nice feeling. When you work in endoscopy as a nurse, you are part of a strong healthcare team. You will never feel alone in your work when you are part of the endoscopy team. You will always have people there for you, even if just to talk or for medical questions.

9. You can be entitled to some pretty good benefits

As an endoscopy nurse, you will be entitled to some pretty good benefits. Some of these benefits include health insurance, paid time off such as vacation time, sick days and personal days, as well as a pension plan. Being an endoscopy nurse can be a gratifying job.

10. You may be able to advance your education for free.

One of the most significant advantages of being an endoscopy nurse is that you can continue to educate your mind with little cost. Many institutions will pay for you to further your education in exchange for you agreeing to work for a set amount of time. It is very common for organizations to provide this opportunity to nurses. This can be a great way to further your education while gaining extra income. This is an excellent way to earn your bachelor’s degree, master’s degree, or even your Ph.D. or DNP. More education can often mean a higher pay rate.


My Final Thoughts


So, do you now know what are the pros and cons of being an endoscopy nurse? Becoming an endoscopy nurse is a big decision with many benefits and drawbacks. The top 10 pros and cons of being an endoscopy nurse that I have presented to you will help you decide if this is the right career choice for you. I have shown you in this article the good, the bad, and everything in between about being an endoscopy nurse. Endoscopy nurses are in high demand, but a long list of pros and cons comes with the job. It's essential to be prepared for all aspects before you start this career.


Jennifer Schlette MSN, RN
Jennifer Schlette is a registered nurse in pediatric critical care in New York City. She is the former Director of Undergraduate Nursing at a college located in New York. After obtaining her BSN from the College of Mount Saint Vincent, she went on to complete her MSN.